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Computer terms pronunciation

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Computer terms pronunciation

Old 12th Jan 2019, 08:49
  #41 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by Random SLF View Post
User input errors are pronounced Eye Dee Ten Tee, which is written as: ID10T.
My IT helpdesk colleagues used PICNIC as a label for some of the calls they dealt with: Problem In Chair Not In Computer.
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Old 12th Jan 2019, 09:27
  #42 (permalink)  

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Hor-chay as in loch that is DaveReidUK !

How about rooter or rowter ?
Always rooter for me.
Router some kind of tool !
El G.
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Old 12th Jan 2019, 09:54
  #43 (permalink)  
 
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My computing career started in 1972. The CPU on my 360/50 was only 512K so we didn't need to worry about mega's until Winchester disk drives (a la star-trek Enterprise) came into being. Data was always pronounced Day-ta by the Brits and Daaar-ta by the Yanks. The Brits also abbreviated everything while the cousins used to spell out the letters. We said CICS (kicks) they said C-I-C-S. For those who are riveted by this, CICS was a strange piece of IBM software which meant Customer Information Control System. As with most IBM software in those days, it neither gave you control or informed you but it did use a lot of memory requiring you to go and buy more memory for your three floor computer. Then there was the 'Grasp' button rhyming with the 'ra' as in Hoo-RAH' for the Brits and the 'ras' as in the American colloquialism for ones bottom. It's all moved on a bit....
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Old 1st Apr 2019, 04:48
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Originally Posted by Allan Lupton View Post
However you say it, the battle to remember that "data" is a plural noun is long lost.
I've got one byte of dat.
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Old 1st Apr 2019, 05:22
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Byte, such a large unit of measure! When I started with the Data General Nova in the early seventies we were using nibbles (Half a byte).
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Old 1st Apr 2019, 08:44
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Gig - as golf, government etc

CICS - thanks for reminding me. I needed some years of therapy after working with it ...

Pronounce ... SNRM. Snerm... once heard, never forgotten. (set normal response mode). IBM for a comms mode quite different to everyone else's 'normal'.

And in a 'my computer was older than your compute' contest ... In 1968, a 2kb drum memory Monrobot. Machine code (which I never mastered). Paper tape input. IBM 'typewriter' as the printer. Magnetic cards for external storage. Thank goodness we moved on.
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Old 1st Apr 2019, 10:09
  #47 (permalink)  
 
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While we are on about pronunciation, the word itself seems to cause problems for many people. I am always shouting at the TV/radio when I hear "pronounciation". Eddie Mair once did a bit on the PM programme about pronouncing difficult place names and said "pronounciation" about a dozen times - grrrr!
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Old 1st Apr 2019, 10:22
  #48 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Tankertrashnav View Post
While we are on about pronunciation, the word itself seems to cause problems for many people. I am always shouting at the TV/radio when I hear "pronounciation". Eddie Mair once did a bit on the PM programme about pronouncing difficult place names and said "pronounciation" about a dozen times - grrrr!
A similar case was "A Very British Map," a feature on Ordnance Survey mapping which was excellent in its coverage of the history of the OS and its maps, but was let down by the voice-over lady who insisted on calling it "Ordinance Survey" despite everyone else getting it right.
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Old 1st Apr 2019, 22:14
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It's all gone a bit quiet here, so another one:
Back in the day, when I was producing stuff that might have been a bit useful (not-to-mention-moneymaking, because it never seemed to) I applied for PAY-tents. No-one seems to do this any more. They pat-tent things. Dunno why.
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Old 2nd Apr 2019, 04:11
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Originally Posted by pmills575 View Post
Byte, such a large unit of measure! When I started with the Data General Nova in the early seventies we were using nibbles (Half a byte).
Speaking of mini computers - do you remember when Wang Computers tried to roll out the tagline "Wang Cares" in the UK. The locals said "you must be kidding..."
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Old 2nd Apr 2019, 07:11
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Devil

Originally Posted by Blues&twos View Post
Ah, but both "gigolo" and "giraffe" are French in origin.

And that's just the sort of thing the French would do.
Gigantic....

Gigantic....

Gigantic...

a big , big love....
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Old 2nd Apr 2019, 18:11
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Another interesting one - Wifi. In the US it's always pronounced "WhyFhy" - but in other parts of the world I've heard 'WeFe'
That’s entirely due to the sound of an “i” in the local language. My Vietnamese friends will express humour in text messages by using “hihi”. It took me a while to understand that they weren’t saying hello!
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Old 3rd Apr 2019, 09:43
  #53 (permalink)  
 
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Long before the term 'IT' came into being and indeed, when computer memories were using mercury columns as delay lines for recirculating the data and only SF writers were thinking of 8bit bytes, let alone gigabytes, we had Gigacycles - Gc/s (now Gigahertz - GHz) and Gigawatt (GW), all pronounced with a hard G. The use of a 'j' in pronunciation came about from non-native English speakers who would have used 'j' in their own language.
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