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Large container ship loses 250 containers. How?

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Large container ship loses 250 containers. How?

Old 3rd Jan 2019, 12:08
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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F = mass x acceleration.

You can work out yourself how the forces ramp up very quickly. Then add in fatigue SN curves and its no wonder things go twang especially going from Blue water into coastal.

https://www.amesweb.info/SinusMotion/SinusMotion.aspx

That was a comment why short roll periods are more of an issue than long periods.
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Old 3rd Jan 2019, 12:26
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Ancient Mariner View Post
Zoom in on picture above and you'll see them.
Per
You mean twist-locks mid-section on the overhanging container?

I have never seen a twist-lock socket casting anywhere other than at the corner of the container.
May be there but I can't see them.
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Old 3rd Jan 2019, 12:48
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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Yes, the rolling will in certain cases be too much for the stack and off they go! Apparently more likely when the inner stacks are shorter/non-existant. This often occurs when these whales are going short distances between super ports loading up before heading fully loaded to/from their long distance destination. Crazy big, 400metres long and 60metres wide....
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Old 3rd Jan 2019, 13:14
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by WingNut60 View Post
You mean twist-locks mid-section on the overhanging container?

I have never seen a twist-lock socket casting anywhere other than at the corner of the container.
May be there but I can't see them.
There's an indention on the 45 with a twist-lock corresponding with the corner of the 40.
Per
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Old 3rd Jan 2019, 17:02
  #25 (permalink)  
 
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There's a pretty good aerial shot of the ship on the BBC: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-46746312 along with some pretty grim reading for the populations of a handful of Dutch islands that have already had to deal with 130 tons of debris on the beaches.
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Old 3rd Jan 2019, 17:25
  #26 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by KelvinD View Post
There's a pretty good aerial shot of the ship on the BBC: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-46746312 along with some pretty grim reading for the populations of a handful of Dutch islands that have already had to deal with 130 tons of debris on the beaches.
Some of said population was pleased finding flat screen TVs.
Per
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Old 3rd Jan 2019, 18:04
  #27 (permalink)  
 
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Speeded up 16x but what the underdeck of a container ship looks like in a storm.

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Old 3rd Jan 2019, 18:44
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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Incorrectly packed containers are often the cause of container loss during heavy weather, I witnessed a number of ships missing containers whilst sailing around Asia just before the typhoon season. One example I saw was a 20ft container with two steel coils inside, clearly strapped down with insufficient straps. As soon as the ship got a roll on, the steel coil broke free and straight through the side of the container.

A disproportionate amount of containers lost contain personal effects, usually everything a person/family owns stuffed into a TEU whilst they move abroad/back home. Putting a container high up on the stack costs next to nothing
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Old 3rd Jan 2019, 19:33
  #29 (permalink)  
 
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A bloke I knew years ago in Tianjin was in the waste paper business. The European Union would pay him to take away waste that was wrapped, sealed and positioned at the dockside. The cost of containers from Antwerp to Tanggu was peanuts and when they arrived the Chinese would pay for all the waste and take it away.

His main worry was working out his Chinese tax returns.
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Old 3rd Jan 2019, 19:46
  #30 (permalink)  
 
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Physics does not scale intuitively. For instance, Superman picking up a container ship from the keel would end up wearing it over his ears. Burning steel buildings collapse.
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Old 3rd Jan 2019, 20:58
  #31 (permalink)  
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Per, it used to be the job of the 1st Mate to work out weight and balance together with unloading priority at different ports.. I guess it is done using a computer before the ship even arrives in port.

It is almost like a ballet watching the container handlers picking and loading them. Is that how it is done?
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Old 3rd Jan 2019, 22:57
  #32 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Ancient Mariner View Post
Some of said population was pleased finding flat screen TVs.
I saw that, but don't think any electronic equipment exposed to seawater would have much value!?

The photos of junk on the beaches are unbelievable.
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Old 3rd Jan 2019, 23:17
  #33 (permalink)  

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KRYSTAL & NEWFOREST,
Look up Trinity House Patricia voyages. I'd really like a go on one of these!
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Old 3rd Jan 2019, 23:57
  #34 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Pontius Navigator View Post
Per, it used to be the job of the 1st Mate to work out weight and balance together with unloading priority at different ports.. I guess it is done using a computer before the ship even arrives in port.

It is almost like a ballet watching the container handlers picking and loading them. Is that how it is done?
If the chief mate were to do that today, the ship would never leave port, never mind unload in a meaningful sequence.
Per
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Old 4th Jan 2019, 00:55
  #35 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Krystal n chips View Post
Whilst I don't know the answer to your question, there is a well established market to travel as pax on a cargo ship...which seems considerably more enjoyable than being on a glorified shopping mall and gin palace populated by pretentious panama hat wearing tossers regaling everybody with their tales of cruises past......I also suspect there's no requirement to get dressed up like a mannequin to eat with the Capt.

This may offer you an insight as to what's available....

https://www.cargoshipvoyages.com/
True. I spent a year in the UK after my dad died and I wanted to make sure no make sure we got no squatters in the flat that I owned. A year later returning with more than airline allowance of baggage I looked into it. The cost then (1993) was about 1300 quid and it would take three weeks to get from the UK back to Canada. When I balked at the price, he said, "Yes, but you dine with the officers every night". I grew up in Tilbury Docks and my Dad was a traffic superintendent, so I said "no thanks" to that and went by air!
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Old 4th Jan 2019, 02:58
  #36 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by parabellum View Post
1500 containers a year is the average lost at sea I heard. If they sink it is OK but if they are full of furniture and other floatables they may only be a few inches below the surface, invisible until they take the keel right off an ocean going yacht!
Speaking of ocean going vessels, there's a lot of flotsam that might turn others into jetsam...

Teenager’s abandoned ‘ghost boat’ discovered off Kangaroo Island after drifting in sea for eight years
https://www.news.com.au/national/sou...a8772522d5b8ee
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Old 4th Jan 2019, 03:36
  #37 (permalink)  
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Did two quite long trips on container ships, the CMA-CGM Columba and the CMA-CGM Vasco de Gama, enjoyed it but long periods of nothing to do except read or look over the surrounding sea for other ships or land.
Going through the Suez canal was probably the most interesting part, followed by watching the maneuvering at each port. Very comfortable cabin, food varies according the nationality of and the likes and dislikes of the crew, pax sat at a separate but adjacent table to the ship's officers. The limit is less than twelve pax, otherwise they then, if over twelve, have to satisfy a mass of legislation pertaining to passenger ships.
We had two on one trip and three on the other! Unrestricted access to the bridge was a godsend, crew usually very happy to discuss anything from seafaring to motor cars, women and houses! The Chief Engineer very happy to show you around down below, one engine, two stroke diesel, goes through three decks, 90,000 HP, max RPM 104. New rules about fuels now though, has to be low sulphur etc. or LNG.
The First Mate still does have the responsibility of loading and unloading but, of course, with the aid of a very large computer programme that the company monitor and the agent in each port as well. Each company does have a master planning section somewhere with staff who can see in many dimensions! Very interesting programme on TV a couple of years ago about a container shipping line's planning office in Hong Kong and how the master plan was fed into the control software for the cranes on shore. When I did it the cost was E110 per day, alcohol, except table wines, extra.
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Old 4th Jan 2019, 04:49
  #38 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by GordonR_Cape View Post
I saw that, but don't think any electronic equipment exposed to seawater would have much value!?

The photos of junk on the beaches are unbelievable.
Depends on the items recovered, but a good wash with fresh water and a long drying period can do wonders.
I'd still offload any such at the Sunday market though. Maybe wear a Groucho Marx mask.
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Old 4th Jan 2019, 10:22
  #39 (permalink)  
 
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We used to export toxic waste by ship from Australia to Ireland for "disposal". I recall reading some articles on the volume of materials reaching its destination were not the same as that when the ship set sail.
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Old 5th Jan 2019, 07:18
  #40 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by cattletruck View Post
We used to export toxic waste by ship from Australia to Ireland for "disposal". I recall reading some articles on the volume of materials reaching its destination were not the same as that when the ship set sail.
Ani fule kno about 'decay'.
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