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The Death of DIY??

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The Death of DIY??

Old 8th Dec 2018, 13:13
  #121 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by yellowtriumph View Post


Given your facilities this would probably make a cheaper alternative for a second iron?
How long do you have to iron bread to make toast?
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Old 8th Dec 2018, 13:20
  #122 (permalink)  
 
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I was thinking of building an extra floor to our house, but that's another storey.
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Old 8th Dec 2018, 13:47
  #123 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by hiflymk3 View Post
I was thinking of building an extra floor to our house, but that's ananother story, other storey.
Or you have lofty ambitions.
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Old 8th Dec 2018, 16:28
  #124 (permalink)  

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Originally Posted by Uplinker View Post
’Copperease’ antiseize grease by Comma is fantastic. I use it for almost every machine screw, bolt and nut I take apart or assemble, even furniture and car wheel nuts. If you don’t, you won’t be able to apply the correct tightening torque to the wheel nuts, because rust and friction etc will give you a false reading and then they won’t be tight enough. I have never had one undo.
I also use copper grease on wheel nuts, although some claim it total heresy to lubricate a wheel bolt thread in any way. One of my Mech. Eng. lecturers (albeit about 45 years ago since I underwent mechanical engineering training) was previously a Rolls Royce Technician. He told us that RR torques were measured after the threads were deemed to be "clean and lightly lubricated". If it's good enough for RR, it's good enough for me. I've never had a wheel nut come loose after I've fitted them but I've had quite a number of seized studs break when trying to remove nuts where others hadn't used any lubrication on the threads and they had rusted solid.

One of my major gripes with mass production is that many bolt threads on cars are not lubricated or protected against corrosion. Anyone who has had the misfortune to change suspension bushes or wishbones on a modern car will have found the same problems.
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Old 8th Dec 2018, 16:29
  #125 (permalink)  

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Ironing - what's that? Just wear a jumper over your shirt...
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Old 8th Dec 2018, 16:37
  #126 (permalink)  
 
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Torques are normally given for "dry" threads, lubricating them will require adjustments. If you don't use a torque wrench, lubricating the bolts hardly makes a difference. I always use a copper, or graphite based paste on all bolts.
Per
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Old 8th Dec 2018, 17:43
  #127 (permalink)  
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When my responsibility included running vehicles, there was a spate of wheel-stud failures.
I approached the tyre fitter and asked him to demonstrate his technique (for truck wheels) and whether he used a torque-wrench.
Fred was a big boy - probably 20 stone - and was 'fit'.
He had been tyre fitter as long as I had been working there (17 years) and I was loath to question his technique, however when he replied that his method was 'tight plus half a turn' I awaited to see how this was achieved.
Fred had asked 'Wally the weld' to weld a six-foot length of scaffolding pole onto the standard wheel-nut spanner and once Fred had used the standard wheel-nut spanner (which was designed to achieve the required torque when used by a typical driver or mechanic) Fred then applied his (undoubted) considerable strength to the end of the six-foot scaffolding pole to achieve the 'half a turn'.
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Old 8th Dec 2018, 17:56
  #128 (permalink)  
 
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I may well be wrong, but I remember being told years ago that using a small smear of grease (ideally the copper stuff) on wheel nut threads was fine, in fact a good idea, but that care was needed to make sure that none got on to the conical nut seat, as the friction between that and the wheel was what retained the nut when torqued to the correct degree. It seemed to make sense to me, as the contact area of the conical seat is pretty large, and in the right place to help lock the nut in place.
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Old 8th Dec 2018, 18:19
  #129 (permalink)  
 
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Very apt thread for me given I recently bought a 1999 Ford Transit based "motorhome" (I use that term loosely), and it keeps breaking down. I'm currently figuring out how to remove, source replacement and then refit, what I believe is a faulty starter motor. On the positive side I could end up saving myself lots of money. On the downside it's entirely possible I'll end up spending hours outside cold and wet, with few of the tools I need, hitting my fingers with a hammer and just getting generally frustrated at my own lack of progress!

Mmmmm...
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Old 8th Dec 2018, 18:34
  #130 (permalink)  
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WD40 is the main tool that you must have.
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Old 8th Dec 2018, 18:37
  #131 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by G-CPTN View Post
WD40 is the main tool that you must have.
Laughably, in my case, I''ve just used exactly that in the hope it'll loosen the retaining bolts prior to another go tomorrow at getting them off!
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Old 8th Dec 2018, 18:42
  #132 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by andrewn View Post
I''ve just used exactly that in the hope it'll loosen the retaining bolts prior to another go tomorrow at getting them off!
Persist with repeated applications of WD40 - it acts as what we used to call penetrating oil (remember that?).
It can also help if you have an impact driver (the sort you strike on the end with a hammer) - not to remove fixings in one go, but to allow the WD40 to penetrate.
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Old 8th Dec 2018, 18:56
  #133 (permalink)  
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I have some 3in1, some penetrating oil, and some leak seal.

All the tons are same size and with a nozzle.

Mrs PN applied some of the latter in lieu the former
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Old 8th Dec 2018, 19:07
  #134 (permalink)  
 
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There is/was a flow chart that went something like this:

If it should move but doesn't; WD40
If it moves but shouldn't; Gaffer tape
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Old 8th Dec 2018, 19:46
  #135 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by hiflymk3 View Post
There is/was a flow chart that went something like this:

If it should move but doesn't; WD40
If it moves but shouldn't; Gaffer tape
If you can fix it with a hammer it's mechanical.
If you can't it's electrical.

Yankee screw driver, push down, it twists the screw.
Irish screw driver works the same way, just hit the screw hard.
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Old 8th Dec 2018, 20:56
  #136 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by G-CPTN View Post
Persist with repeated applications of WD40 - it acts as what we used to call penetrating oil (remember that?).
It can also help if you have an impact driver (the sort you strike on the end with a hammer) - not to remove fixings in one go, but to allow the WD40 to penetrate.
Thanks CPTN - I've just been up to see my Dad to borrow a few sockets and related tools to hopefully make my life easier. Dad is 80 now, but for many years was a very handy mechanic (though not by trade) and was able to turn his hands to almost any car repair job. He had a TR4 for many years and I can well remember,as a boy, standing in the front of the car where the engine used to be that my Dad had just proudly removed with some makeshift pulley hanging froim the garage roof! And the numerous overdrive and gearbox, clutch and synchro changes, as well as the infamous Webers. And as for the Mini's that went in and out of that tiny garage and came out a completely different colour to what they went in - all sprayed on with rattle cans, or even hand painted in some cases! Happy days I guess, and very different times from a DIY point of view.

Anyway, Dad's got quite severe dementia now and he must have asked me half a dozen times in 30 minutes if I was able to access the retaining bolts from the top, or if I needed to go underneath, but despite that he was able to impart more first hand knowedge on starter motors than I'd garnered in a whole day of internet crawling. Funny how the human mind works!

Onwards with the task tomorrow
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Old 8th Dec 2018, 22:40
  #137 (permalink)  
 
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The other item that was occasionally worth its weight in gold in days of yore was a humungous great copper soldering iron. Heat it with a torch until just too hot, then apply it to the nut (if available, failing that with optimism which sometimes worked, to the bolt head) and soon as possible dropping the iron somewhere safe and pop the spanner head back on.
Often saved the day.
But then, you could get into many more places than today's cleverly-packed engine compartments...
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Old 8th Dec 2018, 22:57
  #138 (permalink)  
 
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The main tools to have are:-
The ability to ask.
Know when you could do more harm than good.
Start early before shops are due to close.
Prepare with sobriety and thinking fluid: TEA
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Old 9th Dec 2018, 08:57
  #139 (permalink)  
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Jimtherev, our plumber used a gas blow torch.

LordGrumpy, and knowing when and where and how to employ is.

On YouTube illustration to remove a stuck dust cap was to use a blow torch, only for the brave.

Then on a Clarkson car trip the locals technique to repeat a tyre on the rim was to put petrol in it and light it. The resultant explosion blew the tyre back in place. The flames were impressive, only for the brave.
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Old 9th Dec 2018, 09:57
  #140 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by ShyTorque View Post
One of my major gripes with mass production is that many bolt threads on cars are not lubricated or protected against corrosion. Anyone who has had the misfortune to change suspension bushes or wishbones on a modern car will have found the same problems.
I once paid a bike shop to replace the pedals on my bike, as one of them had broken after 30 years. When I collected it:

"You won't believe the trouble we had getting the old ones off."

"Oh yes I would, why do you think I paid you to do it rather than doing it myself?"
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