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The Death of DIY??

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The Death of DIY??

Old 6th Dec 2018, 11:58
  #101 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by sitigeltfel View Post
We have one of the Bosch kettles in this video, and as he says, the beeps are very annoying. However, he provides a highly technical DIY solution to eliminate them...

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=szwq8PmLFBM

The problem with beeps is that everything beeps. The most annoying is the fire alarm backup battery warning.

Is it the cordless phone (4 off)? Is it the washing machine, tumble drier or bread maker? Micro wave, etc?

Twig it is the fire alarm, but which one, we have 4. Why don't the beep (30 sec or so) and light an LED so you can see which one.
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Old 6th Dec 2018, 12:23
  #102 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by India Four Two View Post
I wonder if that is because you didn't have the right screwdriver. I only recently learned about JIS screws.






https://www.webbikeworld.com/jis-screwdrivers/


I think it's highly likely that I tried to use a Phillips screwdriver, as I'd never heard of the JIS head back then and this was (I believe) before Posidrive became well-known as a variant of cross-head screw. In any case, after I'd removed all the screws with an impact driver they were replaced with a set of socket head screws, which made life a lot easier. The real PITA with this bike was that it needed very frequent oil changes, as it had no oil filter, just a sort of centrifugal spinner thing behind a cover on one side (held in place with three screws). This crude spinner thing trapped bits of crud and needed cleaning out every time you did an oil change, hence part of my frustration with the original screw heads. As the bike was a few years old when I acquired it, the screw heads had already been butchered a fair bit as well.
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Old 6th Dec 2018, 13:32
  #103 (permalink)  

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All I can say is, when it comes to working on motorbike engines, the legendary Mr. Allen, the one who presumably invented the hexagon socket headed screw, also deserves a medal.
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Old 7th Dec 2018, 01:35
  #104 (permalink)  
 
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Talking of Allen keys...
noticed a man in a van the other day, advertising his business...assembling Ikea furniture.

Guess he wouldn't need a big tool kit.
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Old 7th Dec 2018, 01:41
  #105 (permalink)  
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Thread drifting lazily in the winter breeze.

I'm confused. How are they so good when the active radius is reduced?

So much is to do with the doi'n up of things. Torque issues when tightening. Static or running torque? A huge difference. I always used a book figure modified with a lot of gut feeling.

I have a pal that won't allow any grease on wheel bolts. That's another thing when routinely torquing up valuable kit. Lube, or Locktight. I'm never really sure what to do about thread surfaces and usually play safe - though I put copper on wheel nuts/bolts. My previously mentioned big end nuts had to be cut off because of using Colchester lathe clear stuff that must have been decades out of date. May just as well have welded them.

I did consider taking the heads off my Cadillac's Northstar engine. N*, as it's known. One does not use Helix thingies, but a dedicated device that bolts into a newly drilled hole. (one hires a plate to guide the drill) One of the things that stopped me doing the job was getting the very critical torque just so. That and a back that's not as bendy as it was.

I just read an ad that poo pooes TimeSert insert things. Studs are best. They don't show you one.

Last edited by Loose rivets; 7th Dec 2018 at 01:56.
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Old 7th Dec 2018, 03:35
  #106 (permalink)  
 
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More drift!

when it comes to working on motorbike engines
Anyone else remember the days when working on British bikes, you had to have three sets of spanners? BSW, BSF and BA!
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Old 7th Dec 2018, 04:41
  #107 (permalink)  
 
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Three keys were normal for British cars, one for the doors, one for the ignition and another for the glove box.
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Old 7th Dec 2018, 05:17
  #108 (permalink)  
 
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Back to the ingenuity of African guys:

A few years back I spent some time in Malawi. My hostess had just brought over a shipping container of supplies, in which was a Maytag-type combination washer-dryer. But of course it did not run there, not the least because it was a 120v machine in a 220v country. "No problem", she says, "the guys will get it running". It had electronic controls rather than the mechanical dials, and obviously that circuitry was wonkers.

No way, sez I, that an African guy will be able to get that circuit board up and the machine transitioned to 220v. In fact I made a $10 bet to that effect and agreed on a 14 day time. Guy had that thing all in bits in the dirt, as the whole machine thing was new to him, soldering this to that, and occasionally going to the "market" to get something. Day 14, I go to collect my bet, and he plugs it in, fills it with water out of a bucket (no running water in the yard!) and runs the load of laundry with the electronics working fine.

This from a guy who didn't grasp the concept of a flush toilet.
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Old 7th Dec 2018, 08:15
  #109 (permalink)  
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Loose Rivets, Kwik Fit lectured me on lubricating the wheel nuts (not). My garage, an expert on my model of car, uses a grease. Not sure what but it is copper in colour.
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Old 7th Dec 2018, 08:16
  #110 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by krismiler View Post
Three keys were normal for British cars, one for the doors, one for the ignition and another for the glove box.
And one for every Vulcan bomber, the same one😀

The local Halfords, local to the airfield, always stocked extra FA501.
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Old 7th Dec 2018, 08:47
  #111 (permalink)  

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Originally Posted by India Four Two View Post
More drift!



Anyone else remember the days when working on British bikes, you had to have three sets of spanners? BSW, BSF and BA!
My Indian made Royal Enfield (not yet fifteen years old) has some BSC threads (British Standard Cycle) on the studs holding the seat to the frame. I had to have a batch of nuts made after one of them vibrated loose and disappeared somewhere up the road. Most of the bike needs Imperial spanners, but there are also some metric threads too.
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Old 7th Dec 2018, 09:01
  #112 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Pontius Navigator View Post
Ever tried to replace a toaster element or kettle ring?

They are the Ultimate disposable items. Mrs PN would change them every couple of years if she could.

I think we have had 3, maybe 4, in 50 years. The lattest is this year after Mrs PN descalled the Delonghi. After the descale it leaked like a sieve. Jug kettles, pah.
Next time you're in the market for an electric toaster or kettle have a look at the Dualit range as they have a comprehensive range of spares for their products. I do have personal experience of contacting them and getting advice and fitting spares and they were excellent.

https://www.dualit.com/support

Look for their 'Classic kettle' if you want if want you can replace the element in.
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Old 7th Dec 2018, 09:40
  #113 (permalink)  
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Pontious N. Kwik Fit lectured me on lubricating the wheel nuts (not). My garage, an expert on my model of car, uses a grease. Not sure what but it is copper in colour.

Tis a grease called 'Copper Ease'. A reasonably sized tub of it is available in your local Halfords etc for a few quid. Last you for years. Great at preventing seizing of bolts due corrosion.


Regards
Exeng
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Old 7th Dec 2018, 09:48
  #114 (permalink)  
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ExEng. TY. I am sure my garage has a big tub

They are a Mercedes specialist not a franchise. Dad worked on Yorks and son lectures at College.

One thing you may know, they had a two-part adhesive that they used to fasten some plastic trim where the lugs had broken. It came in a packet, you mixed it in the packet and then used it once. Set like glue

I need something to fasten a self adhesive LED that won't.
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Old 7th Dec 2018, 10:44
  #115 (permalink)  
 
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they had a two-part adhesive that they used to fasten some plastic trim where the lugs had broken
Probably Araldite, or a another version. It's a slow setter so things have to be taped to each other for about twelve hours. After twenty four the join is unbreakable.

I've known helicopter gearboxes, Lycoming prop reduction gearboxes et al repaired with it.
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Old 7th Dec 2018, 23:19
  #116 (permalink)  
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Definitely not Araldite. This was one of the newer types.. I can't remember if it was two sachets or a binary product where it was in a single pouch that had to be squeezed to mix. It was quick setting without clamping but 24 hrs to set hard.
t
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Old 8th Dec 2018, 12:01
  #117 (permalink)  
 
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A modern epoxy of some sort. It comes like putty which you knead together with the hardener. You can get underwater epoxy that sticks to steel submerged in seawater! Ship engineers use it for temporary repairs to water pumps and the hull etc.

’Copperease’ antiseize grease by Comma is fantastic. I use it for almost every machine screw, bolt and nut I take apart or assemble, even furniture and car wheel nuts. If you don’t, you won’t be able to apply the correct tightening torque to the wheel nuts, because rust and friction etc will give you a false reading and then they won’t be tight enough. I have never had one undo.
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Old 8th Dec 2018, 12:41
  #118 (permalink)  
 
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Look for their 'Classic kettle' if you want if want you can replace the element in.
I have a back up kettle, no element it sits on the hob and uses the gas to heat water, a saucepan would also do. It even whistles when it boils. Toasters are usually non repairable but the same result can be achieved by laying the bread under the grill. An iron is a different matter as there isn't really anything which can be used as a substitute and you normally only find out its broken once you start ironing which will be when the shops are shut and you need the clothes for the next morning, therefore I keep a spare.
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Old 8th Dec 2018, 13:01
  #119 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by krismiler View Post
I have a back up kettle, no element it sits on the hob and uses the gas to heat water, a saucepan would also do. It even whistles when it boils. Toasters are usually non repairable but the same result can be achieved by laying the bread under the grill. An iron is a different matter as there isn't really anything which can be used as a substitute and you normally only find out its broken once you start ironing which will be when the shops are shut and you need the clothes for the next morning, therefore I keep a spare.
Given your facilities this would probably make a cheaper alternative for a second iron?

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Antique-F...AAAOSww-lcAo64
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Old 8th Dec 2018, 13:09
  #120 (permalink)  
 
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This type is better as it gets filled with glowing charcoal and stays hot for longer.
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