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The Death of DIY??

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The Death of DIY??

Old 15th Dec 2018, 09:42
  #181 (permalink)  
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I replaced the door on a washing machine a few years ago with a very reasonably priced spare from a local white goods repair specialist. Another fault manifested itself a couple of years later which was beyond my simple mechanical skills so I popped into see them, could they visit to repair? What's the fault? How old's the machine? Nah son, do yourself a favour and get a new one from Allders - cheaper in the long run.
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Old 15th Dec 2018, 12:08
  #182 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by India Four Two View Post
I wonder if that is because you didn't have the right screwdriver. I only recently learned about JIS screws.






https://www.webbikeworld.com/jis-screwdrivers/
No, Jap bikes of that era had screws made of what appeared to be cheese. Just show them a screwdriver and the head would round off.
Not only was an impact driver essential but it also taught me how to drill off a screw head correctly. This paid dividends when I started my aircraft engineering apprenticeship
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Old 15th Dec 2018, 14:02
  #183 (permalink)  
 
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there is a youtube video that will show them how to do something in less than an hour with $20 worth of parts, that the 'pro' would charge a few hundred and couldn't get to it until next week - they decide DYI isn't a bad deal.
Those parts are also much easier to obtain using the internet, instead of having to go to a succession of suppliers until you find one that has it in stock, all kinds of spares can be searched for online including for obsolete models. Some merchants allow you to search by uploading a picture of what you want, which it compares with its database. Problems with particular items become known about through forums and repair kits can be specifically designed and sold to solve them.

Some manufacturers are making it increasingly difficult to obtain parts and manuals, and do their best to make their products impossible to fix. When I bought the handle for my washing machine door, there was a sign saying that they would not supply major parts for their appliances and referred you to a repair service. Consumables and minor service items were okay, but motors and control units were not.

These guys are opposing this. https://ifixit.org/right
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Old 15th Dec 2018, 16:10
  #184 (permalink)  
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krismiler, my best internet buy was a wing mirror glass. The original was heated, self dimming 3rd but the oil was leaking. A new one was Kirk 300. Once I had the part number, internet search, one on eBay exactly what I needed under 100. Then I sold the u/s one back on eBay.
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Old 15th Dec 2018, 23:39
  #185 (permalink)  
 
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Speaking of DIY; I am having a spot of bother with a troublesome cistern valve. (I suspect youngest son crossed threads when replacing same some time ago). I thought I would replace it and went off to Homebase. Lots of different varieties but couldn't find input pipe size specified on any of them. I gave up with the intention of doing the same thing at B & Q in the morning but, browsing their on line catalogue, I see they are all spec'd at 1/2". I was sure all my plumbing in the house was 50mm. Can anyone confirm if it is standard in the UK to have 1/2" pipes in a house only 25 years old, or is there a 50mm fitting famine at the DIY stores?
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Old 15th Dec 2018, 23:53
  #186 (permalink)  
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50mm is a heck of a size for domestic water supply.
Perhaps you are confusing 15mm with 1/2" - there is a degree of interchangeability (usually a different gland for compression fittings).
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Old 16th Dec 2018, 05:08
  #187 (permalink)  
 
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What G-CPTN said! Largest fresh water pipe I've come across was 3/4", and that was the main supply line in a 50 year old house. My current abode doesn't have anything larger than 1/2" (not quite 40 years old).
Currently have an unplanned DIY project going - big wind storm last night and it took out 24 ft. of my wooden back fence. They put in a retention pond behind my property about 20 years ago - so now the ground along the back properly line is wet all winter long and even the pressure treated posts eventually rot out. The worst part is digging out the old post concrete caps - a real pain (literally - my back is not happy right now).
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Old 16th Dec 2018, 05:39
  #188 (permalink)  
 
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Have 1.25 coming into the house, and 3/4 distributing to the various zones. (1 to our 360,000 BTU tankless heater that feeds half the house)

on the DIY note, if I want to get any work done at my hangar (3 phase power, where my good tools live), I have to go at off hours to avoid the endless stream of supplicants looking for household repairs involving simple machine work or welding.

nobody seems to be able to do it himself, and we no longer have machine shops that do itinerant work.
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Old 16th Dec 2018, 07:44
  #189 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by KelvinD View Post
..............I see they are all spec'd at 1/2". I was sure all my plumbing in the house was 50mm. Can anyone confirm if it is standard in the UK to have 1/2" pipes in a house only 25 years old, or is there a 50mm fitting famine at the DIY stores?
Yeah, as others have said, the modern equivalent for 1/2” pipe is 15mm, NOT 50mm, which is 2” !!

I think the 15mm is the outside diameter of the pipe, whereas the 1/2” was internal diameter of the old standard.
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Old 16th Dec 2018, 07:46
  #190 (permalink)  
 
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G-CPTN: You are right, of course! I had been discussing some other stuff with my brother earlier and my mind must have been stuck in the 50mm rut! I went to bed shortly after writing and found myself wondering "Did I really write 50mm?"
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Old 16th Dec 2018, 09:06
  #191 (permalink)  
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Our house is new. It doesn't stop the builders using whatever is to hand. The input is blue plastic, through large black plastic fittings to white plastic. Our real plumber changed some of the latter under the sink to 22mm copper reducing to 15mm copper to feed water softener, dish washer and taps, with white plastic return to feed the house. He has changed all the outlets at taps etc to copper tails and isolating valves.

The original 'experts ' had omitted some isolating valves including, crucially, the one to the outside tap. Probably didn't have enough in his kit.
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Old 16th Dec 2018, 09:13
  #192 (permalink)  
 
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The 1/2" referred to on a ball valve or equivalent isn't the pipe size but the size of the thread, 1/2" BSPM usually. This means it has a 1/2" BSPM threaded section poking out for the pipe to connect to, either with a tap connector with internal washer, or with a bit of flexible pipe that has a 1/2" BSPF end fitting, with an integral rubber washer. The tap connector will already be on the end of the pipe if you're replacing an existing valve, but the chances are that the internal fibre washer may be shot, as they are pennies it's worth always fitting a new one when you take the fitting apart.

1/2" BSPM and 3/4" BSPM have been the standard thread sizes on this type of fitting since long before pipe sizes went metric, so unless you're replacing the pipe you usually don't need to worry about what size it is. The metric equivalents to the old 1/2" and 3/4" bore copper water pipe are 15mm and 22mm OD, which are close, but not quite the same diameter. You can get metric compression fittings to work just fine on old imperial size pipe, just by using an imperial size olive in place of the metric one that comes with the fitting. Imperial olives are still available from most plumbers merchants.
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Old 16th Dec 2018, 10:01
  #193 (permalink)  
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Some considerable time after my mum had a washing machine feed fitted to the kitchen sink cold supply by a plumber, she noticed there had been a small but persistent leak somewhere in the cupboard. I traced it to the actual washing machine tap which had been utterly bodged - he'd added a T to the cold feed perfectly properly (15mm onto 1/2") but for some reason had made a right pigs ear of the tap fitting, plenty of gunge to try and seal it. I replaced everything from the T onwards (including the washing machine hose), problem solved. Unfortunately I eventually had to replace the cupboard base unit which had been ruined by the leak.
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Old 16th Dec 2018, 10:22
  #194 (permalink)  
 
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Just realised that I should have clarified the actual thread sizes above, as they are not as they may seem in reality. A 1/2" BSP threaded fitting has a major diameter of 7/8" and a 3/4" BSP threaded fitting has a major diameter of 31/32", so a lot larger than their stated size might tend to suggest. It all goes back to the way British pipes and their fittings used to be specified by their nominal bore, rather than the outside diameter, as is now the case with metric pipe (but not threaded fittings for metric pipe, which are still in Imperial thread sizes).
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Old 16th Dec 2018, 17:35
  #195 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by tdracer View Post
What G-CPTN said! Largest fresh water pipe I've come across was 3/4", and that was the main supply line in a 50 year old house. My current abode doesn't have anything larger than 1/2" (not quite 40 years old).
Currently have an unplanned DIY project going - big wind storm last night and it took out 24 ft. of my wooden back fence. They put in a retention pond behind my property about 20 years ago - so now the ground along the back properly line is wet all winter long and even the pressure treated posts eventually rot out. The worst part is digging out the old post concrete caps - a real pain (literally - my back is not happy right now).
Saw something on line for Sika Post MIx which is goodfor new posts............... looked the business on youtube.
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Old 16th Dec 2018, 18:04
  #196 (permalink)  
 
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A friend swears by Post Savers (https://www.postsaver.com/), a bitumen-like, heat-shrink sleeve that covers the bit of the post where it goes into the ground (and where posts usually rot, right at ground level). I've not used them, but intend to give them a go next time our fence posts need to be replaced. I agree with the above that modern pressure-treated timber preservatives are hopeless when compared to the older stuff (that's now banned).
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Old 16th Dec 2018, 18:30
  #197 (permalink)  
 
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Our downstairs loo has a suspended toilet pan bolted to the wall and the seat had come loose. The nuts were so inaccessible that to tighten them I had to break my arm in two places, chop off three fingers and ruin a perfectly good socket set!

(Only kidding about the socket set).
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Old 16th Dec 2018, 18:33
  #198 (permalink)  
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For the most part one can get away with 1/2 and 15, but definitely NOT 3/4 and 22. Expensive softer copper alloy olives are best. I used water-pump grease on all my compression fittings' threads. There is a 3/4 to 22mm converter in soldered joint. They (or a specific one, I can't remember) can be soldered one end and inserted into compression joints on't t'other.

My Essex home had three 1-1/4" pipes running the length of the house. One big bore cold and two hot to give circulation around the airing cupboard and towel rail. It worked fine for the old days when 500 gallons of heating oil was 35 quid. That is not a mistake - and I got Green Shield stamps.

It was nice to have instant hot at any tap, but when I had gas connected the huge boiler was far too expensive to let this circulation happen all day long. In summer, it was on for 2/3rds of the time that the heating ran for. Just couldn't believe it. Just shows how inefficient the system was. So, I set about fitting control valves for a long and a short circulation. In hindsight, that was totally OTT as just one cut off would have been fine. The valves were controlled by tiny 12v buttons in the tiles in each bathroom. Press one and it let the water gravitate around. Press two and the water was rushed via a Grundfos pump (which had to be bronze for constant new water. )

My pal had built the house ten years before as a quasi American concept house. I spent the rest of my time there trying to keep the American advantages, but make it look more Frintony. Hard to do with such fantastic homes in the town.
Anyway, after 10 years even the big bore pipes were furring up. Opening up joints here and there gave me a shock, but also forewarning. I found a watersoftener in the local for 60 quid and installed that. Then I overheated Big Bessie the boiler (also 60 quid) a few times over the next weeks. The 3/4 taps on the furthest bathroom allowed the calcium bits to flow out, and I removed BUCKETSFULL of the stuff over this time. Later plumbing revealed perfect clear copper inside for the next quarter of a century. Even our old AEG washer was like new when I scrapped it. That old Permutitt really did its stuff, though guests moaned that they couldn't stop their soap foaming when rinsing off. Can't please everyone.

The best test for water softening was how one's comb slipped through freshly washed hair. Seriously, that was better than all the testing kits.

I wrote a manual for the new owner as he'd said he'd like the zoning etc., but I don't really think he was impressed with all the 12v control system. (It was going to be totally voice controlled but in those days the voice recognition to an ISA PC relay board was somewhat futuristic.) I feel fairly sure the new owner would have ripped out the lot and put in a large modern COMBI or the like. Shame, but then, he'd ripped out my den's panelled walls.

I spent months of my life plumbing, pressurising the pipes upto 100psi for a week or so on test. Soldered joints were all done with good flux and very expensive solder. All wiped to a fine silver line. What I can't believe is I didn't take one photo of the finished job - despite disassembling much of the boilerhouse so I could have white walls with the shiny copper on top. Yes, I think I did give it a shine as well.

As I said before, not really something that earns a fortune, not at the speed I work, but something I was compelled to do after hearing a conversation in a crew bus in the 60's. A skipper was telling his FO how to do a compression joint. Yes, I could do that, thought I. It altered my life.

Last edited by Loose rivets; 16th Dec 2018 at 18:54.
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Old 16th Dec 2018, 19:02
  #199 (permalink)  
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Built a deck about 12 years ago and had to dismantle it last year. No post had rotted. A couple of posts, set in postcrete, could be lifted cleanly from the waterlogged concrete and reused. I think total anaerobic immersion acted as a preservative. On other posts I was careful to bring the concrete above ground level. In this case the post wasn't saturated and again no rot.
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Old 16th Dec 2018, 19:16
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Good old Creosote. Pre-vac'd wood, and any cuts and ends dipped in the now illegal brew.

Post concrete. Yes, it's a tricky point. A neighbour's guest knocked over my US mailbox a while back. He bought me such a nice bottle of wine, I said he could do it every week.

The neighbour used a petrol auger to make a super 10" hole and I used up a bit of wood I'd been saving for such an occasion. 10 X 3 it was, so let any urchin with a baseball bat have a go at that.

The concrete was not special, but raised to a slope. I prepared a kind of trough against the wood and let it go off. When it was dry, I forced silicone sealant into that trough, pushing so hard some would go into the shrunken wood's gap.

Then I got a new steel postbox.

Then a Mockingbird made it its duty to sit on it every day and shit contentedly - while it mocked.
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