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What Car? Would you not buy?

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What Car? Would you not buy?

Old 26th Sep 2018, 20:18
  #81 (permalink)  
 
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My first auto was the Saab95 [fabulous car] and having been used to clutches previously, was advised to use left foot braking. What a mistake, if it hadn`t been for the seatbelt I would have shot through the windscreen.
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Old 26th Sep 2018, 20:43
  #82 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by gemma10 View Post
My first auto was the Saab95 [fabulous car] and having been used to clutches previously, was advised to use left foot braking. What a mistake, if it hadn`t been for the seatbelt I would have shot through the windscreen.
My first auto too, Saab95 estate and still have it five years on. Was dubious about an auto at first, now I love it. The garage lent me a 93 diesel manual, one build under the dictat of GM. Terrible car, clunky, rattly, cheap plastic trim. That's one car I'd never buy. Now a classic 900 aero convertible in black would do nicely thanks. But this would do as well.

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Old 26th Sep 2018, 20:59
  #83 (permalink)  
I don't own this space under my name. I should have leased it while I still could
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I drove 99s and 900s for 30 years and my daughter then drove a diesel for 8 until it self destructed somewhere in Austria. I loved the idiosyncratic design that in many ways led the standard features of modern cars. Loved the double belt seat belts. Got engine spares from Triumph provided you didn't tell them It was a SAAB. Easy to swap cruise counter fro m car to car. Early cars didn't have a rear wiper as aerodynamics meant it stayed dry - in theory.

And the security cage. Saw one hit by a 3 ton concrete pillar, broke the windscreen and dented the roof.
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Old 26th Sep 2018, 21:09
  #84 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by gemma10 View Post
My first auto was the Saab95 [fabulous car] and having been used to clutches previously, was advised to use left foot braking. What a mistake, if it hadn`t been for the seatbelt I would have shot through the windscreen.
Must have been a different SAAB 95 to the one my boss had with a freewheel. That was weird, take your foot off the gas and it just kept going. Another boss had an early, very early, SAAB 99 turbo. The very epitome of not enough power instantly becoming TOO MUCH POWER on muddy roads. While driving it I never planted it in a ditch, but he did.

'a
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Old 26th Sep 2018, 21:38
  #85 (permalink)  
 
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Where`s Loose? He`s had lots of high end specked beemers with auto.
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Old 26th Sep 2018, 21:54
  #86 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by captainsmiffy View Post
Have always yearned after a morgan....now that I can afford it and swmbo is happy, am pleased to note that nobody has slandered it here......yet!
Ah yes, Morgans; I have heard that they will be producing their 2009 model before very long?
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Old 26th Sep 2018, 22:08
  #87 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by jimtherev View Post
Ah yes, Morgans; I have heard that they will be producing their 2009 model before very long?
With or without woodworm?
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Old 26th Sep 2018, 22:12
  #88 (permalink)  
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Many years ago, (early 1960s) my colleague picked me up in his brand new Morgan 4/4,and first we headed for a filling station,
Another motorist came over and admired the car then uttered the words "Ah" they don't make them like this any more . . ." - which upset my colleague.
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Old 27th Sep 2018, 00:54
  #89 (permalink)  
 
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The first auto I liked was in a Mercedes W123 230E. This was the newer model with the M102 engine. A totally different car from the older M115 200, Great acceleration and smooth.
Having said that, currently all my cars are manual, they're getting rare in new cars for my 2011 Nissan will probably stay.
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Old 27th Sep 2018, 05:49
  #90 (permalink)  
 
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I've had BMW 530d in two varieties; the E61 and F10. The former had a 6-speed auto and manual handbrake, the latter an 8-speed and electric ditto. Both were absolutely fantastic to drive, and whilst I'm currently driving a manual, my next car will certainly be auto. The electric handbrake, which I've also got in my current car, is a non-issue which takes around 10 seconds to get used to.
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Old 27th Sep 2018, 05:58
  #91 (permalink)  
 
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I never left-foot brake in autos now. ​Be careful sir.
When I was racing, we always used left foot braking (clutch only used when starting out from a stop - never used when moving). A few times when faced with an ill-handling car (serious push/understeer) I found that I could get the front end to grip and the car rotate by carefully timed stabs on the brake and throttle mid corner- something that wouldn't be possible if I was using the right foot for both pedals.
All that being said, I almost never left foot brake in a road car. When racing, braking was usually max capability - the only 'feel' needed was for lockup - it was 'hard' braking. Further, we'd bias the brakes such that the rears locked first - if they locked a quick stab at the throttle could get them turning again. Totally different technique to what you do in a road car. It's simply bad practice and can lead to problems (many left foot brakers put subtle pressure on the brake pedal without realizing it - hurting fuel mileage and killing the brakes). Heel and toe downshifting aside, it's nearly impossible to apply the brakes and throttle at the same time when using the right foot.
Last time I left foot braked in a road car was about 5 years ago headed home from the doctor with a serious case of gout in my right foot - applying the throttle was OK, but the pressure required to right foot brake was excruciating. So I used left foot braking to get home (manual trani in my S2000, working a clutch and left foot braking was tricky).
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Old 27th Sep 2018, 08:25
  #92 (permalink)  

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The garage lent me a 93 diesel manual, one build under the dictat of GM. Terrible car, clunky, rattly, cheap plastic trim. That's one car I'd never buy.
That's probably because underneath it was a Vauxhall Vectra, as above the worst handling car I've ever driven.
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Old 27th Sep 2018, 09:02
  #93 (permalink)  
 
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Best not over generalise - my wife's car doesn't need pressure on the brake pedal to get into "D"; but it does need it to move it from "D" to "N". My first automatic was like that, too.
Fair enough. My car, (DSG auto built in 2008), actually tells me in text on the dashboard to put my foot on the brake before selecting gear !

I really do wish you automatic, electric handbrake disbelievers would go and try a three litre auto beemer, and I am fully convinced you would not only eat your hat,you would want one for the weekend.
I have driven a Merc with an electric handbrake. The lever, (well, switch), was hidden under the dashboard on the outboard side of the car instead of on the centre console. It pushed to apply, pulled to release, which is the opposite way round to what you would expect. Secondly, I like the idea of having a totally separate, simple lever operated handbrake, since it needs no electrical power and therefore doubles as an emergency brake if all else fails. With a conventional lever handbrake, a passenger has at least a chance of stopping or slowing the car in the event of driver incapacitation.

Honest John swears by left foot braking and it may come naturally to those brought up on automatics, but I never have.
(My mistake, in the bit of yours I quoted, you do say left foot on brake etc.)

Muscle memory means that left and right feet deliver entirely different pressures even though you think they are the same.
Exactly. Unless you have raced or rallied cars, your left foot is unlikely to have the fine control and feel required to left-foot brake subtlety and effectively.

Left foot braking is all very well, and I did it myself, but if you drive a mix of manual and auto cars as I do, you might find out the expensive way that it is much safer to use your right foot for go and stop, your left foot only for clutch or just bracing your body through the corners.

Autos don’t need a foot on the brake and accelerator pedals at the same time. (manuals do if you are heeling and toeing, but that is only really for racing). Autos either have torque convertors or auto clutches to hold them on an up-slope*, and some cars hold the brakes on for you when you push the pedal twice and then move your foot onto the accelerator for you to do a hill start.


* However, I would NOT recommend using a DSG auto clutch gearbox to hold oneself on a hill - the #1 clutch will wear out. But it will hold you while you move your foot from the brake pedal to the accelerator.

Last edited by Uplinker; 27th Sep 2018 at 09:31.
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Old 27th Sep 2018, 09:55
  #94 (permalink)  
 
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Where to start!

On gear boxes - my personal preference is manual and I would always, always encourage people to learn to drive with a manual. I think "automatic" only driving instruction should be banned - my opinion - caveated to say "for able bodied people" as obviously there are circumstances where automatic only may be necessary for an individual. I can and have driven automatic, no animosity towards them, in fact if driving overseas - they can be very helpful in allowing greater concentration on the road!!

On fuel - I have owned diesel cars for almost a decade. When I swapped from a 2l petrol to a 2l diesel (both second hand Mondeos), my fuel bill plunged. I'll be getting a new car next year though and would be looking at petrol again, but they seem to be a minority still in new vehicles.

On cars - well, I haven't hit the mother lode of a trouble-free vehicle yet! First car was a Rover 200 MkIII - K-series engine blew its head gasket pretty much on schedule at 66k. Second was a Ford Fiesta MkV, which was reasonably good for the first few years, but the engine and suspension deteriorated significantly over time, regardless of servicing and driving behaviour

I then had a high mileage Mondeo MkII (all I could afford post child and house move!) which was fine until a gentleman in a Beemer decided give-way markings are for other people and smacked in the side of it. It would have carried on for sometime more had it not been for that! I replaced that with a MkIII (The petrol to diesel move) - another high-miler. That was fine until the first week of a new job when it blew its head gasket. It was repaired but didn't feel right and it transpired that the cylinder head was cracked putting it beyond economic repair for me.

A few months later, I inherited my dad's Skoda Octavia which I still drive. Again, nice at first - but despite regular servicing and maintenance has suffered a raft of problems, continuous problems with the suspension (I suspect due to living somewhere with a far higher number of speed bumps that previously), failures in the air con system, dodgy connections in the electrics. Much to my surprise, it passed its MOT yesterday, despite the smoke it can sometimes produce on acceleration (yes it is a diesel too) - it'll be getting replaced within the next 6 months! The Octavia is also one of those cars where self-replacement of headlight bulbs is nigh-on impossible - unlike the Fords we have had.

My wife had the Fiesta, that was replaced with a Focus MkIII which she still runs. All is well with that car - but its 1.6l petrol engine can't accelerate worth a damn and it has the turning circle of a disabled oil tanker.

So, I will read this thread with interest for positives. Don't seem to be many yet!
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Old 27th Sep 2018, 10:22
  #95 (permalink)  
 
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Must have been a different SAAB 95 to the one my boss had with a freewheel. That was weird, take your foot off the gas and it just kept going. Another boss had an early, very early, SAAB 99 turbo. The very epitome of not enough power instantly becoming TOO MUCH POWER on muddy roads. While driving it I never planted it in a ditch, but he did.
I think some of you are confusing the Saab 95 from the 1960s with the Saab 9-5 from the 1990s.
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Old 27th Sep 2018, 10:30
  #96 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
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Just passed 100k in our Lexus 350 RX running on LPG. Only faults in that mileage two light bulbs! Indeed the 4x4 centre that services the car says that if everyone bought Toyotas and Hondas he would be out of business - no money in just servicing. He just loves the Landrover/Range Rover products - they keep him in Caribbean holidays!

As to Morgans - if you enjoy the sensation of driving along two ladders, go for it! I have a 1966 Lotue Elan S3 SE and have now done over 180k in it over 32 years- not entirely without problems - but if you thrash a 52 year old car over the Alps/Dolomite/Pyrenees you have to expect the odd part to fail - but the grins per mile are amazing....................
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Old 27th Sep 2018, 18:16
  #97 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by sitigeltfel View Post
My SL has a feature called SBC Hold. When you stop at lights, an extra firm push then release on the brake pedal keeps the brakes on. When the lights change just touch the accelerator pedal and off you go.
It's a bit anti social at night though because the brake lights stay on to annoy those behind you.
Iíve a B Class and I agree about the Hold and also about inadvertently pi$$ing off people behind you in the dark -youíd have thought the Auto-boffins could have sorted that out. I also like the fact that when you open the door the handbrake comes on, although Iíve not tried it at speed.
What I donít understand is what/any advantage there is in having a keyless push start ignition. Iíve never locked myself out of the car ever in 55 years or so and I canít see any other benefit.
Anyone know better ?
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Old 27th Sep 2018, 19:34
  #98 (permalink)  
 
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I can see the point of keyless entry. What I cannot fathom is the credit card sized card that Renault use, which you have to slot in, and then press the stop star button. No advantage whatsoever over a key, just bigger to carry around, and you can't combine it with any other keys.
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Old 27th Sep 2018, 19:57
  #99 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by TangoAlphad View Post
If you have keyless entry I quite like it, especially in the rain. No fumbling around in my flight bag after a trip or if I've got the wee one in tow. Run up to the car, open the door and go.
Necessary? Nah. I still like it though.
Keyless entry -yes but .... thereís all this stuff on the net about storing the key in a Ďfaradayí box etc to stop the car being stolen.
I use the key remotely to get in the car but I canít work out what the advantage is to starting the car with the key in my pocket.
If I pull that plastic push button thing out of the ignition key receptor and store it elsewhere, presumably any thief then, like me, needs a key ?
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Old 27th Sep 2018, 20:07
  #100 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by wowzz View Post
I can see the point of keyless entry. What I cannot fathom is the credit card sized card that Renault use, which you have to slot in, and then press the stop star button. No advantage whatsoever over a key, just bigger to carry around, and you can't combine it with any other keys.
One of our cars has it. The routine goes like this.

Missus picks up key, uses the car and when she returns locks the car using the keyless function. Forgets key is in her handbag.
Next trip, she can't find the main key (still in her handbag) and uses the spare key. When she returns, she again locks the car using the keyless function and leaves the key in her handbag.
Next trip, she can't find any of the keys because she has forgotten they are buried in the depths of her handbags and takes one of our other cars.
While she is out I want to use the car, but can't, because she has all the f#£&@%g keys!
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