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Big Boys' Train Sets

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Big Boys' Train Sets

Old 21st Aug 2018, 15:40
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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GtW, I hope you made it to the spiral tunnels viewing platform - and don't miss Takakkaw Falls. There's also guided hikes to Burgess shale and Walcott fossil quarries for the athletically inclined.

​​​​​​​Oh yes, there's a commercial glider operation in Invermere, but the smoke might not allow flying. We had maybe two miles viz at Cowley last Saturday.
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Old 21st Aug 2018, 16:55
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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Driving on US 90 just outside of Rosenberg TX (Where there's a great deal of railroad activity) we watched a trainload of wind turbines passing. Each blade was, I guess a little less than 50m long, carried on 2 flatcars, I gaped. My wife, who is Texan, said "Texas ceiling fan". Texans are different!

After an excellent landing etc...
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Old 21st Aug 2018, 17:51
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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You can get Texas toilet paper at Travis Perkins.........only £23 a roll.


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Old 21st Aug 2018, 17:58
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Gertrude the Wombat View Post
The slow speed does mean a saving on level crossing hardware - no need for gates or lights or anything, just a STOP sign. Stop, look, and if you can't see a train you've got minutes to get across.
Funny, that doesn't happen in films or TV series.
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Old 21st Aug 2018, 21:14
  #25 (permalink)  
 
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Just been held up for 20 mins while a CN train of 139 cars and 4 locos hauled itself out of town @+/-25mph.

Quite sad that I had nothing better to do than count them, I guess!
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Old 21st Aug 2018, 22:54
  #26 (permalink)  
 
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This will be worth travelling to see once they have finished the project:

https://www.atlasobscura.com/article...eam-locomotive

Talking of railroad crossings I remember seeing a clip on YouTube where a freight train wiped out a car. After the fact they were talking with the engineer and they asked him why he didn't stop.
"10,000 tons doesn't stop in a hundred yards" came the reply.
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Old 22nd Aug 2018, 00:18
  #27 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by Trossie View Post
Have you watched a train go through the Spiral Tunnels?
Not yet - no train came past whilst we were watching. But Mrs GtW is into trains so I expect we'll have to have another try. We've been through spiral tunnels on the Tende line.
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Old 22nd Aug 2018, 00:21
  #28 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by RatherBeFlying View Post
GtW, I hope you made it to the spiral tunnels viewing platform - and don't miss Takakkaw Falls. There's also guided hikes to Burgess shale and Walcott fossil quarries for the athletically inclined.
Takakkaw was today, Burgess shale is Thursday. Yes, we did maybe 400m climbing to day, not looking forward to 800m on Thursday.
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Old 22nd Aug 2018, 00:23
  #29 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by chevvron View Post
Funny, that doesn't happen in films or TV series.
Today there was a train stopped just before the level crossing. The driver waved us across.
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Old 22nd Aug 2018, 04:12
  #30 (permalink)  
 
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There are still big shortcomings in rail operations, single tracking etc.
In the Fraser Canyon, the CPR and CNR have single-tracks. For over 100 years, they operated independently until finally they realized that it would be mutually beneficial to cooperate and run a dual track operation!



The Cisco Bridges are a pair of railroad bridges at Siska (historically known as Cisco) near Lytton, British Columbia, Canada. The Canadian Pacific Railway and Canadian National Railway both follow the route of the Fraser River, one on each side, and the routes exchange sides at this point. The easier CPR route was laid first; when the CNR arrived later they needed to follow the more difficult route. The area is popular with railfans due to the proximity of the two bridges (which allows both bridges to be taken in one photograph, sometimes with a CPR and CNR train on each bridge simultaneously), and the easy access to the area (the Trans-Canada Highway (BC Hwy 1)) is parallel to both bridges down the east bank of the river. Directional running in the Fraser Canyon means that both CPR and CNR trains may be seen on both bridges.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cisco_Bridges
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fraser_Canyon
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Old 22nd Aug 2018, 04:21
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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Quite sad that I had nothing better to do than count them, I guess!
er340790,
I do that too. Even sadder is that I look for "hot boxes"! Where I live, south of Calgary, the railway comes through the centre of town, about 100 m from me. It is one of the main routes for 100+ oil tank-car trains, heading to the US midwest. Thinking back to the Lac Mégantic disaster (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lac-Mé..._rail_disaster), I often wonder if the town has a good disaster response plan.
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Old 22nd Aug 2018, 05:16
  #32 (permalink)  
 
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run a dual track operation
A dual, single-track operation?
Can't find much on the amount of single-track railway through the Rockies in a brief search.
Imagine double tracks all the way through.
Business drool material.
We're spending a lot of money on many lesser things and it's been more than a hundred years since we last had a go at all that very tough granite and gravity.
Tools have improved in the interim.
I hear Elon likes a good bore.
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Old 22nd Aug 2018, 06:25
  #33 (permalink)  
 
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meadowrun,

Almost all of the mainline long-distance operations in Canada are on single track with passing loops. I suspect it is just a matter of economics, but it does come with inherent risks. In 1986, there was a serious accident near Hinton, Alberta, where a freight train in a passing loop, passed a signal at danger and collided head-on with the Super Continental passenger train, killing 23 people - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hinton_train_collision

Besides the sharing of the CNR and CPR tracks in the Fraser Canyon, the CNR has double tracks through the Yellowhead Pass, west of Jasper and the CPR has double tracks through the Rogers Pass, between Golden and Revelstoke. I'm not aware of any other significant double track.

This is a nice segue into a picture I was going to post next, about long trains. In July, I was flying a glider towplane at Valemount, BC and I took a picture of a CN freight, negotiating the curve to go from the southbound single track from Prince George onto the eastbound double track through the Yellowhead Pass. It looked just like a model train!

Looking south towards Valemount:





Finally, for a great picture of a long train in the prairies, have a look at CP Rail's main page: https://www.cpr.ca/en
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Old 22nd Aug 2018, 08:25
  #34 (permalink)  
 
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Best I've ever done is driving steam locos with 4 coaches attached, first with an 0-4-0 saddle tank then a few months later with an 0-6-0 pannier tank.
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Old 22nd Aug 2018, 16:16
  #35 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Gertrude the Wombat View Post
Takakkaw was today, Burgess shale is Thursday. Yes, we did maybe 400m climbing to day, not looking forward to 800m on Thursday.
Well done You might like to try out Waterfall Valley, first have a lunch stop or overnight at Twin Falls Lodge and return over the Whaleback (Southbound). A very long day.

Highly recommend Cathedral Mountain Chalet and restaurant, caveat it's been a long time since I was there.

From the campground East of Field there's a Walk in the Past interpretive trail that ends at an abandoned Loco.
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Old 22nd Aug 2018, 17:03
  #36 (permalink)  
 
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Many years ago I caught the train from Denali down to Anchorage, talk about slow !!!!, at any point on the track you can hail the train to stop and pick you up.
If I remember correctly it took about 7 hours.
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Old 22nd Aug 2018, 17:13
  #37 (permalink)  
 
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In comparison the longest freight I drove in the UK was about 110 Standard Length Units (SLUs) which is about 660m. I think that train had to have special clearance as it was longer than most loops between Carlisle and Rugby, about 1700 tonnes trailing with one 3300hp loco.
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Old 22nd Aug 2018, 17:19
  #38 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by er340790 View Post
Just been held up for 20 mins while a CN train of 139 cars and 4 locos hauled itself out of town @+/-25mph.

Quite sad that I had nothing better to do than count them, I guess!
15 minutes and 20kph would imply a train 5km long. With 144 cars and locos, that makes the average length of each piece of rolling stock 35m.
20 minutes and 40kph (25mph) would imply 92m rolling stock, which seems a little excessive.

(I can't help it; I'm an engineer. I see numbers and compulsively calculate for plausibility! Like you I also count railcars...)
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Old 22nd Aug 2018, 18:36
  #39 (permalink)  
 
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BHP Mt Newman ran a one-off (I think) iron ore train from Newman to Port Hedland a few years back.
7 point something km long and just under 100,000 tonnes.

It was done also as a bit of a proving exercise.
Long trains can develop some interesting dynamics in the string of wagons, when two sections are going uphill while the third section is going downhill, for instance.
It is really very easy to tear the train in half or alternatively, to have it concertina.
Multiple locos, up front, in the middle and at the rear, help to reduce the risk but coordinating them is a fine art.

Train brakes - a bit old but still apt

Last edited by WingNut60; 22nd Aug 2018 at 18:48.
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Old 23rd Aug 2018, 07:54
  #40 (permalink)  
 
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As mentioned by Wingnut (above) the iron ore trains in the Pilbara are seriously serious. This is one of Hamersley Iron's. HI were gracious enough to supply me with a Jetranger for a month's fieldwork. One of my pilots was a yahoo who liked to slalom through the gorges. The other was an ex-QANTAS 747 Captain who had retired early to move back to stick and rudder. I like my bush pilots to be old, grey and alive.


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