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Ship loses 83 containers in rough sea

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Ship loses 83 containers in rough sea

Old 2nd Jun 2018, 17:10
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Ship loses 83 containers in rough sea

Australia alert after ship loses 83 containers - BBC News
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Old 2nd Jun 2018, 17:27
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Just imagine if your cherished unique classic car was in one of the containers . . .
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Old 2nd Jun 2018, 18:18
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Lot of classic aircraft travel by container as well - Flying Legends at Duxford often has a surprise from the US containered across the Pond.
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Old 2nd Jun 2018, 18:23
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I was on a ship that lost so many containers that the insurance company sent us a diploma. "First container to reach the beach."
Volvo Penta diesel engines, kitchen fittings, toys, Pioneer stereo equipment, you name it, we lost it.
Eventually the ship was considered, not fit for the North Sea.
Lots of fun though.
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Old 2nd Jun 2018, 19:51
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My wife once lost a shipment of books in a container that went into the Atlantic.

Problem solved these days by distributed print on demand - if the shipping industry can't or won't deliver, don't use it.
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Old 2nd Jun 2018, 20:06
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This recalls the recent Robert Redford movie, All is Lost, where his character's sailboat and a wayward shipping container have an unfortunate rendezvous in the night.

When I was a young sailor, we struck a submerged log in a twin-diesel, 50 foot sportsfisherman running around 20 knots, and it required going over the side and putting a tarp across a new, and unwanted below-the-waterline porthole that the log created. We limped home, all pumps going and even some hand bailing and managed to save her. I would imagine an encounter with a container would have likely sunk her.
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Old 2nd Jun 2018, 20:19
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Semi-submerged containers are the one thing that prevents me sleeping properly on a yacht under way. As a result I’ve had too many fretful nights and fatigued days at sea.

The shipping industry’s cavalier attitude to deck cargo, which goes without proper challenge by its regulators, insurers, et al, is a modern scandal.
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Old 2nd Jun 2018, 20:21
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Fit every container with a depth charge, so that it sinks itself on immersion in sea water?
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Old 2nd Jun 2018, 20:24
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Originally Posted by Father Dick Byrne View Post
Semi-submerged containers are the one thing that prevents me sleeping properly on a yacht under way. As a result Iíve had too many fretful nights and fatigued days at sea.

The shipping industryís cavalier attitude to deck cargo, which goes without proper challenge by its regulators, insurers, et al, is a modern scandal.
not being a mariner, are there advisories that raise sailors awareness of such along with drift info, etc?
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Old 2nd Jun 2018, 22:35
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Depending upon to whom the question is put, between 500 and 1,000+ containers are lost at sea each year on average. There is no international maritime standard on reporting such losses, although the IMO has been working with shippers to reduce the occurrence, including the requirement for a more accurate weighing system.

In areas where trade winds exist and strong currents are seen, a wayward container's forecast location can easily meander across a grid of tens of thousands of square nautical miles in size in the space of just a few days.

Therefore, warnings of potential hazards due to wayward containers would not be very helpful, as the area of concern would be an ever-increasing grid of enormity as the days and weeks go by.
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Old 2nd Jun 2018, 23:18
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There is no international maritime standard on reporting such losses
? Not even through insurance claims ?
M/Ts don't count?

On the lighter side, there are probably a few more million dollars of Legos floating around out there.
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Old 3rd Jun 2018, 01:01
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What kind of hull would a semi-submerged shipping container not rip a hole in?
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Old 3rd Jun 2018, 02:42
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To eliminate the threat of metal growlers lurking low - they need to sink if lost overboard. There's little chance of salvage.
A relatively simple design mod could be done to containers that don't have to be air tight, to make that possible.
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Old 3rd Jun 2018, 03:40
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Originally Posted by meadowrun View Post
To eliminate the threat of metal growlers lurking low - they need to sink if lost overboard. There's little chance of salvage.
A relatively simple design mod could be done to containers that don't have to be air tight, to make that possible.
A simple, low-pressure relief (vent) valve in the top could achieve that.
However my math also says that a 40 footer (say 26500 kg load) laden with material with an SG of <.75 when wet / immersed may not sink anyway.
The buoyancy of the material could support the weight of the container shell.
I am open to correction by a more proficient mathematician.
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Old 3rd Jun 2018, 03:42
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What about the buoyancy of the goods they have in them? Even if the container was only wire mesh it may still float when full of foam chips
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Old 3rd Jun 2018, 03:55
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Originally Posted by lomapaseo View Post
What about the buoyancy of the goods they have in them? Even if the container was only wire mesh it may still float when full of foam chips
I remember a container full of CRT TV's washing up on the West Australian coast many years ago.
The buoyancy of the CRT's was quite enough to support the container.
I presume that they were of a type that did not have any holes in them or, if they did, that they didn't leak enough for them to lose all of their buoyancy.

Enterprising locals also found that if you hosed them out thoroughly and then dried them (also thoroughly) at least some of them worked just fine.
I am not sure how the Law of the Sea works in such cases. Maybe salvage or may be theft.
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Old 3rd Jun 2018, 06:46
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Having hit a semi-submerged container in open ocean on a large yacht, I can attest that it is not fun. Very life threatening.

The container companies need a strict reporting and checking system together with BIG penalties to be levied on them for any loss overboard , just as MARPOL has done for oil/garbage discharge.
I’m pretty sure they will then come up with a system to prevent it.
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Old 3rd Jun 2018, 07:23
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Most containers sink rather quickly. Shipments containing lightweight items packed in styrofoam (electronics) or watertight reefer units, on the other hand, can float for a very long time.

What kind of hull would a semi-submerged shipping container not rip a hole in?
Part of the equation includes the angle and speed of impact, but I would imagine a very large steel-hulled vessel could survive such a collision with creases or dents, but no holes punched clean through her.

On a glass-hulled sailing yacht, while a hole in the side would certainly ruin the fun, and possibly sink her, the next biggest problem caused by a container collision would be the loss of the rudder, unless you have the gear to rig an effective drogue and have the supplies to last the leg extension.

Having hit a semi-submerged container in open ocean on a large yacht, I can attest that it is not fun. Very life threatening.
I'm sure I am not alone in wanting to hear more, SL.

Last edited by vapilot2004; 3rd Jun 2018 at 07:36.
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Old 3rd Jun 2018, 07:24
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Originally Posted by lomapaseo View Post
What about the buoyancy of the goods they have in them? Even if the container was only wire mesh it may still float when full of foam chips
It seems that at least some of these containers contained items that would remain buoyant for some time, such as disposable nappies. face masks and toilet paper.
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Old 3rd Jun 2018, 07:51
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We hit one in an aircraft carrier once. Huge hole ripped open in the bow, hands to bailing stations and the whole biz. Limped into dry dock in Barbados (could have been Bermuda) for 6 weeks or so...
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