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EasyJet: Inside the cockpit

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EasyJet: Inside the cockpit

Old 23rd Aug 2017, 14:33
  #161 (permalink)  
 
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captain outside the cockpit chatting to f/o mother;
My Wife, who is a nervous flyer, calms down when when she sees one of the FD crew coming into the cabin. She now knows there are no problems.

Chip Butty - I wonder how many on here would know what to do with a bitterballen.

i was a bit (very) aghast that the (very) young lad who did not know of Biscay (he was PF FAO-LGW)

nor actually knew where he was
Don't be fooled by TV, he knew exactly where he was.
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Old 23rd Aug 2017, 14:39
  #162 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by wtsmg View Post
It was changed from 3 episodes to 2 last month.
Could there be conspiracy afoot? Having not seen the 2nd episode yet I flicked on ITV Player this afternoon and noticed that episode 1 has been pulled - usually programmes are available for a month after broadcast. Hmmmm.....
Looking forward to episode 2 though, itching to find out who's a bum and who's a boobs man this week!!
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Old 23rd Aug 2017, 14:47
  #163 (permalink)  
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Was there a titter that ran through the crowd?
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Old 23rd Aug 2017, 17:22
  #164 (permalink)  
 
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From a PR point of view this short video probably does more good for an airline than 2 full features "documentaries" on ITV.

Also what a great atmosphere on that flight deck. Relaxed yet professional - the lady Captain obviously has huge respect and also full marks to the supportive FO.

Last Flight Of Captain Louise Drury
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Old 23rd Aug 2017, 20:50
  #165 (permalink)  
 
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The kid who didn't know where the Bay of Biscay was and had never had a chip butty should be fine once his balls drop and he's lost his virginity.
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Old 23rd Aug 2017, 22:01
  #166 (permalink)  
 
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[QUOTE=Cloud Bunny;9870583]Could there be conspiracy afoot? Having not seen the 2nd episode yet I flicked on ITV Player this afternoon and noticed that episode 1 has been pulled - usually programmes are available for a month after broadcast. Hmmmm.....

I watched episode just over an hour ago, so it is still there.
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 10:27
  #167 (permalink)  
 
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[quote=Lancelot37;9870943]
Originally Posted by Cloud Bunny View Post
Could there be conspiracy afoot? Having not seen the 2nd episode yet I flicked on ITV Player this afternoon and noticed that episode 1 has been pulled - usually programmes are available for a month after broadcast. Hmmmm.....

I watched episode just over an hour ago, so it is still there.
Episode 1?
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 12:44
  #168 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by InSeat19c View Post
The kid who didn't know where the Bay of Biscay was and had never had a chip butty should be fine once his balls drop and he's lost his virginity.
This is an incredible quote and it echoes the truth.

That cadet with the squeaky female-like voice will forever be challenged in this industry unless his testicles somewhat descend and he turns into a proper man.

He had no clue what a chip butty was, fair enough. But not to know where the Bay of Biscay was?

Firstly, he sounded English to me! No hint of Dutch in him!
Secondly, during the pre-flight brief, I'm certain the captain would have briefed him on the route and especially flying over the Bay of Biscay! It does indeed take up a bit of the route so the pilots would need to think about diversion airfields along that stretch in case of emergency...
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 13:56
  #169 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by A320ECAM View Post

Firstly, he sounded English to me! No hint of Dutch in him!
Really

Personally I thought he sounded more like a young Henning Wehn than someone from the Netherlands.
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 23:35
  #170 (permalink)  
 
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Why does one need the GSE'S now as well as the 120 grand to even get to start training these days?

I am aware of several individuals, who left school with no certificates what so ever. One couldn't spell to save himself. They finished up on heavy jets, LHS, armed with U.k. licences.
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 23:36
  #171 (permalink)  
 
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Why does one need the GSE'S now as well as the 120 grand to even get to start training these days?
So you know where the Bay of Biscay is.....?
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 23:49
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Originally Posted by fireflybob View Post
So you know where the Bay of Biscay is.....?
LOL. That really scared when i heard that. When i did recover I didn't know whether to laugh or cry.
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Old 26th Aug 2017, 13:59
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Who care about butty sandwiches or the FOs geography knowledge.
Id like to know the official consequences of having a hostie in the Captains chair in flight with a minimal experienced FO as PF, while the Captain is chatting with the family in the cabin... Does EZ still have an AOC?
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Old 26th Aug 2017, 14:39
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Originally Posted by Dan_Brown View Post
Why does one need the GSE'S now as well as the 120 grand to even get to start training these days?

I am aware of several individuals, who left school with no certificates what so ever. One couldn't spell to save himself. They finished up on heavy jets, LHS, armed with U.k. licences.
On the other hand, I've known graduates with degrees in aeronautics, astrophysics etc who have sailed through their ground school exams but had no cockpit sense or synergy. Consequently, they failed when it came to the actual art of flying.

Whilst it filters out the less able, academic achievement isn't always the measure of a good and competent pilot.

Last edited by annakm; 26th Aug 2017 at 15:02.
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Old 26th Aug 2017, 15:05
  #175 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by annakm View Post
On the other hand, I've known graduates with degrees in aeronautics, astrophysics etc who have sailed through their ground school exams but had no cockpit sense or synergie. Consequently, they failed when it came to the actual art of flying.

Whilst it filters out the less able, academic achievement isn't always the measure of a good and competent pilot.
I once flew with such a pilot.

Much of my professional flying career was test flying, in some form or another, some in aircraft that had no formal clearances and where the limits of the safe flight envelope were still being explored. This meant flying some fairly hairy sorties from time to time, although always with pilots that were exceptionally good, often ETPS graduates.

The only time I've ever been scared sh*tl*ss in an aeroplane was when it was being flown by a highly qualified on paper, but clearly very unskilled in the art of flying, character. My unease started when critical speeds were marked on the ASI with chinagraph marks, before we taxied out, and then got steadily worse as I realised the character was, literally, flying by numbers. The landing was bloody awful, with two near-ground loops and the aircraft coming off either side of the runway - it was just a miracle there were no aircraft on the taxyway.

After landing I jumped out and went to have a cup of tea. Two things happened; the first was an instructor/examiner I knew came up to me, hands held high, saying "it's not my fault, I couldn't find a reason not to pass him", the second was a yell directed at me by the airfield manager, who started to rip me a new one until I got a word in edgeways to say that I was not PIC.
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Old 26th Aug 2017, 15:38
  #176 (permalink)  
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I am aware of several individuals, who left school with no certificates what so ever. One couldn't spell to save himself. They finished up on heavy jets, LHS, armed with U.k. licences.

Okay, got to comment on this. But I'll add my usual bit about dyslexia just in case it helps some nippers in the future.

Post war Secondary school. Teachers were cajoled, probably under threat of being sent back to the services, to teach us mud-covered scruffs.

No exam passes in anything whatsoever when kicked out at 14. My science teacher thought I was bright, but my written work was, well, utter bollox.

C&G one day a week for telly-mending got me nifty with a slide rule. About 21 YO started flying.

Flying was easy. IR scary, but only cos of the 50 quid a go stresses. 2nd bash on the CAFU Dove. Phew!

Now I was in the poo because the work, while not being that complex, was so extensive. Not many box-ticking exams then. Proper writing and big plotting and weather charts.

Struggled like hell but got there with picking up 'Partials'. Got a job hauling gear on a DC3.

Viscount. BAC 1-11. Technically easy - I could draw the entire electrics diagrammatic, but still couldn't spell, so had to be careful to whom I wrote what.

ALTP, OR ATPL. (I even had a SCPL) Was a breeze. I'd got the hang of exams by then and walked through everything except Radio Aids, cos I thought I knew everything about radio and therefore didn't study. They really hit us with Propagation that quarter, and masses failed. I couldn't remember a One-hop-E or a Heavyside anything. Knew how the aids worked but still just missed. Picked it up later.

America some years later. 6 hours to do the ATP. One hour, checked work and wrote a long note about why a performance question was wrong. (it really was wrong) I got everything but one question. I've always assumed it was that one cos computers answered the paper which I didn't know.

'twas a buggah, cos bloke at Boeing school in Dallas talking about the ATP said, 'And that's why no one ever gets 100%.'
That was a good while back. It's just possible, if I'd pushed the point, I might have been the first.


Okay, so that's the braggin' bit. But, I didn't qualify for BEA because of my schooling, and you may recall, I noticed the ad with the Trident on it, was for cabin Cleaners. I couldn't have got that job despite being able to fly a similar aircraft.

In fact, I didn't realise until I was old that I had something wrong with me. I always drove fast. Bikes and E-Types etc., all seemed to happen in slow motion. But asked to name a road. No chance. Just didn't register. The Rivetess used to cry with laughter at my letters. She learned to de-code them eventually.

Then there was the time in Shell Mex house. They'd got my passport and licence, and I'd got a form to fill in. I could not remember how to spell my first name. Buggah, that. Wiliam looked right, but so did William. I fudged it and no one gave a sh1t.

Years later I stopped eating cheese. For the first time in my life I could see a line of text across the screen. I started to learn to spell. (If I live to 100 I'll be fair) My brain could interpret the writing on a propeller while it was spinning, but ask me how many rings on a Captain's arm, and I wouldn't be able to tell - except it wasn't 2 or 3, which I could tell, so knew it must be 4. Any double letters, ll ss etc., were jazzing so much they never got learned. It was as though something in my brain was over-clocked like hell. I had no idea how different I was to normal people.

Instrument flying was totally relaxed, it was mostly text that caused the problem, though the parallel bars on gold stripes clearly didn't register properly. Again, those repeated parallel lines.

Now, here's the point. If you've got a kid who is not learning to spell normally, try cutting out anything with Tryptophan in it. Allow a month or so. To this day, if I eat cheese, it will affect me within a few hours - every time. I can't be the only one. Erm, can I?







.
..
.

Last edited by Loose rivets; 26th Aug 2017 at 15:53.
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Old 26th Aug 2017, 18:06
  #177 (permalink)  
 
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Some excellent posts.

LR I salute you. There is a lesson for the youngsters. Don't give up, just keep at it.

Last edited by Dan_Brown; 26th Aug 2017 at 19:20.
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Old 27th Aug 2017, 17:42
  #178 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Loose rivets View Post
Okay, got to comment on this. But I'll add my usual bit about dyslexia just in case it helps some nippers in the future.
No offence intended but people with dyslexia should not be allowed to become airline pilots. If you want to know my reasoning and logic behind this, please refer to the Saudia flight which crashed and had a dyslexic flight engineer.
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Old 27th Aug 2017, 17:52
  #179 (permalink)  
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I've flown with several pilots who had dyslexia, to one degree or another, and you wouldn't be able to tell unless they told you so.

You statement indicates that you don't have an understanding of dyslexia.
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Old 27th Aug 2017, 18:29
  #180 (permalink)  
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Well, we're getting away from Easy Jet, but it won't take a moment.


Dyslexia in real terms is word blindness. I'm not like that. I can, and could always, read reasonably well. What I can't do is see the word in my mind's eye when I go to spell it.

I could, and still can, remember machine parts from my career, and even my childhood. I can almost feel some of them in my hands during moments of nostalgia. Machines were obvious to me from my youngest years.

The odd thing is, even now I'll have a stab at a word and if it's not right look at spell check. I will know immediately which of the words is correct.

When I started writing The Perfect Code - some million words finally honed into a quarter-million word novel - the pages were covered in squiggly red lines. Later, and by then I'd stopped eating cheese, there were only two or three squiggles per page. Most involved double . . . or not-double where logic dictates a double letter should be, kind of words

The 1950's and 60's British ALTP (ATPL) was the hardest flying written in the world. It was the standard copied (just put coppied ) by many countries as the basis for their exams. Fortunately for me, many contenders were furrin' and their spelling probably worse than mine. It took the heat off. In the meantime however, I had learned to hear the spelling in my mind's ear and the exams were very near to intensive swatting, so really I was not too bad.

Now, crashing as the result of poor/abysmal spelling. I suppose there's just that chance, but I'm not sure about the one you mentioned. The #2 and 3 seemed a bit questionable. Perhaps you'd give a link to the exact accident so we're on the same page.

The majority of people I flew with as a training F/O were fine. I did this for 18 months and enjoyed it at first. Most had never flown jet transport before so there was a lot of friendly interaction and enjoyable flights. However, I was eventually lumbered with someone that was an alcoholic and 'probably psychotic'. (his old boss' words many, many years later) It was horrendous. VP's post rang a few nasty bells.

Back then, a senior training captain and I thought, friend, said, "Robbie, I let the fact he was an ex ** captain influence me when I passed him." I was a captain without a command. It was horrendous. Don't want to go there right now or it'll spoil the day, but it's that kind of person slipping through the net that is the real danger.

I watched as an entire class cheated on their 1179 paper. The teacher, a much admired skipper, walked out saying, "Play the game, chaps." And that's just what they did. Played it for all it was worth and went on to set some of the lowest standards I've ever seen. Time to stop.
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