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The Train Set HS2 and the rest

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The Train Set HS2 and the rest

Old 24th Jul 2017, 23:55
  #61 (permalink)  
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I have tried (very hard) to find a map showing the 'interference' between HS2 and the Shimmer Estate in Mexborough - without success.
I have a rough idea of where the proposed route will cross the Doncaster Road and the canal which runs alongside the Shimmer Estate houses - but no definitive maps of either the estate or the HS2 route.
https://www.google.co.uk/maps/search.../data=!3m1!1e3
https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...ume3_WATER.pdf
should show the route, but it is so sluggish as to be unmanageable on my computer.
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Old 25th Jul 2017, 09:50
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G-CPTN,
As I understand it, the local residents there are equally uncertain of the precise path and the exact number of houses affected by destruction or noise. And it's rather more important to them.
But of course HS2 is far more important than a few people in their wretched little houses. They will probably never use it anyway.
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Old 25th Jul 2017, 10:32
  #63 (permalink)  
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I did manage to find a frame with the housing estate shown with an overlay of 'blight' but I cannot reproduce it here.

https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...ume3_WATER.pdf
Frame 8 of 12, PC-02-238

Comelybank Drive.
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Old 25th Jul 2017, 12:25
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Originally Posted by G-CPTN View Post
I did manage to find a frame with the housing estate shown with an overlay of 'blight' but I cannot reproduce it here.

https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...ume3_WATER.pdf
Frame 8 of 12, PC-02-238

Comelybank Drive.
From what I heard, those who will definitely lose their homes are aware. Others close by don't know if they will also be included or (perhaps worse) will stay but suffer noise pollution. The whole estate suffers planning blight now and houses aren't selling.

This is local info from someone who lives a couple of km away.

Edit: That should read the whole area is suffering planning blight since no-one wants to live near the construction site or the working line.

Last edited by Sallyann1234; 25th Jul 2017 at 12:39.
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Old 25th Jul 2017, 16:59
  #65 (permalink)  
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In my search for Comelybank Drive I have become aware of many other dwellings that are overshadowed by 'blight' - either at risk of demolition or being blessed by views of the trains at close quarters.

I stayed with my best man who lived with the East Coast mainline at the bottom of his (small) suburban garden - albeit raised up on an embankment such that the trains were level with the bedroom windows. We were given the bedrooms at the back of the house and were subjected to a distant whistling sound followed by a couple of seconds of 'clatter' - after which all was quiet again (silent, in fact, this being Northumberland - a settlement built adjacent to the railway but otherwise in open country close to the coast - a delightful setting apart from the railway).
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Old 31st May 2018, 20:20
  #66 (permalink)  
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What are your feelings about digging up bodies from cemeteries to make way for HS2?
Should such hallowed grounds be sacrosanct? - or, as the bodies are now long decayed, are they just something that is 'in the way' and that can be moved without having to compensate the inhabitants?
Will archaeologists discover useful history from the industrial Revolution - so the exercise can be deemed a positive one?
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Old 31st May 2018, 20:59
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Originally Posted by G-CPTN View Post
What are your feelings about digging up bodies from cemeteries to make way for HS2?
Should such hallowed grounds be sacrosanct? - or, as the bodies are now long decayed, are they just something that is 'in the way' and that can be moved without having to compensate the inhabitants?
Will archaeologists discover useful history from the industrial Revolution - so the exercise can be deemed a positive one?
I believe it's still fairly common to exhume bones from graves after ten years or so and transfer them to an ossuary in graveyards in places like Italy, a custom that dates back to the early days of the Roman Catholic church, and was probably carried over from Roman practices from before the adoption of Christianity.

So there's an established precedent for digging up graves, it's really just a cultural thing here that some don't approve of it. It's one reason that I don't wish to be buried, as it just creates an ongoing problem for future generations.
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Old 31st May 2018, 22:03
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Originally Posted by G-CPTN [img]images/buttons/viewpost.gif
What are your feelings about digging up bodies from cemeteries to make way for HS2?
Should such hallowed grounds be sacrosanct? - or, as the bodies are now long decayed, are they just something that is 'in the way' and that can be moved without having to compensate the inhabitants?
Will archaeologists discover useful history from the industrial Revolution - so the exercise can be deemed a positive one?
Didn't stop cross rail, if you saw the documentary about the construction of it then you would have seen the archaeologists moving remains from several sites including one which was suspected of being a plague pit.
Originally Posted by Tankertrashnav
We are certainly the most neglected region down here when it comes to transport links, and I sometimes wonder whether the railways are just waiting for expensive cracks to appear in the Royal Albert Bridge at Saltash to give them the excuse to shut down rail services in Cornwall altogether.
When I was home in Wales at early May bank holiday questions were being asked in the Senedd about the cancellation of a proposed tunnel into Heathrow to allow travellers from Wales and the West to get there directly without having to go into London and backtrack.
It was mooted at the time that a lot of rail network improvement proposed for the rest of the country was just a dangled carrot to get cross rail through, now it's built the rest of the country can go whistle.
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Old 31st May 2018, 22:22
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Originally Posted by VP959 View Post
I believe it's still fairly common to exhume bones from graves after ten years or so and transfer them to an ossuary in graveyards in places like Italy, a custom that dates back to the early days of the Roman Catholic church, and was probably carried over from Roman practices from before the adoption of Christianity.

So there's an established precedent for digging up graves, it's really just a cultural thing here that some don't approve of it. It's one reason that I don't wish to be buried, as it just creates an ongoing problem for future generations.
Plenty of graves were dug up and the remains re-interred when St. Pancras was being extended for HS1. It's nothing new.
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Old 4th May 2020, 06:22
  #70 (permalink)  
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https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/a...pace-ps629hlkw

At an average 16mph, trains in the north travel at horse-and-cart pace

Trains in parts of northern England run at “painfully slow” speeds barely quicker than a horse and cart because of congestion, research has found.

A study published today says that improvements to the network simply cannot wait for the construction of new high-speed lines in 20 years’ time. It says that freight trains in the north travel at average speeds of 16mph on major east-west lines, with a knock-on impact on passenger services. The existing network “does not work”, the report says, because it is “overloaded with long-distance, commuter and freight traffic all competing for too little space on the tracks”. The findings suggest that some trains are hardly quicker than a horse and cart — between 5 and 15mph.

The government has promised to regenerate the railway between cities such as Liverpool, Manchester, Leeds and Sheffield as part of its commitment to “level up” the country. Boris Johnson confirmed in February that the north-south HS2 line would be built in full from London and Birmingham to Manchester and Leeds. It will eventually join a new east-west line across the Pennines to create an overarching “High Speed North” network, he said.

There is already multibillion-pound work under way led by Network Rail to improve the network. This includes an upgrade of the Transpennine line between Manchester and York via Leeds, extending more than 100 platforms at 70 stations and a 340 million investment in lines around Liverpool.

However, the study by three transport experts says the transformation promised by Mr Johnson’s vision would take too long. HS2 is not expected to be completed to the north until 2040 and there is no timescale at all for the new east-west high-speed line.

The report, led by Jim Steer, a transport consultant and a former director of the Strategic Rail Authority, says there are “serious problems to be addressed in the north’s rail network in the next five to ten years that cannot wait for these flagship schemes”. It recommends a “super hub” in central Manchester with a tunnel into Piccadilly station from the west that can be used by fast trains from Wales, Chester, Liverpool, Barrow-in-Furness and Glasgow en-route to the other side of the Pennines. This will free existing lines for commuter trains, the study adds.

The report, Revisiting High Speed North says: “The network does not work, crucially through Manchester, but also in Liverpool, Leeds and Sheffield, where stations and lines are at capacity, or in Manchester’s case overcapacity. Average journey times for Transpennine freight are as low as 16mph and 17mph. These issues cannot wait for a solution until the 2040s.”

The report, co-written by Ian Wray, visiting professor in civil design at Liverpool University, and David Thrower, a transport consultant, says the upgrade is needed to allow more freight to be carried by rail. Freight trains are often held to allow passenger services to pass, with those travelling between Liverpool and Drax power station near Selby, North Yorkshire, averaging 16mph. Some trains from Immingham docks on the Humber travel at 17mph or 19mph. The authors write: “It’s not enough to provide fast links between the major cities. It is also essential to overcome existing bottlenecks. We need a grand design, but we need a realistic programme too.”



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Old 4th May 2020, 08:03
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Just to be clear it's not the passenger trains travelling slowly but the freight traffic. The new Nova stock used by TPE is capable of 100mph and has rapid acceleration and hill climb ability. Because most of the train tracks across the north of England are only intermittantly dualled (up/down fast and slow) and there are insufficient goods loops you get hold ups when very heavy freight trains are being routed through congested areas.

As an example have a look at the circituitous route this 2000 tonne "Bin liner" has to take and how slow it's average speed is..........

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Old 4th May 2020, 09:21
  #72 (permalink)  
 
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Just been looking at the YouTube channel of the chap that made the video above. It's full of "driver's eye view" videos taken from various types of trains, but what surprised me is just how many views his videos are getting. It seems that he gets tens of thousands of views for videos lasting up to nearly four hours, just showing railway tracks ahead. I guess lockdown must be really getting to some people . . .
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Old 4th May 2020, 09:27
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Perhaps watching them is good way to combat insomnia.
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Old 4th May 2020, 09:32
  #74 (permalink)  
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The web version of Slow TV......

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slow_television
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Old 4th May 2020, 09:35
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Originally Posted by Bergerie1 View Post
Perhaps watching them is good way to combat insomnia.
Counting sleepers...
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Old 4th May 2020, 12:03
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RedHillPhil
Plenty of graves were dug up and the remains re-interred when St. Pancras was being extended for HS1. It's nothing new.
Definitely! They had to dig up an old grave yard to build St. Pancras station in the first place!
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Old 4th May 2020, 13:06
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What is worrying them about the northern extension I can tell you is the sheer volume of old coal workings in the area. The existing railway lines in the are suffer from this, and have done so for much of the time there has been railways in the area. Indeed the old steam / diesel Thames Clyde Express which traversed this area took an extra hour due to speed restrictions from subsidence to traverse this area, as against the more direct Leeds to Kings Cross route. Apparently the initial surveys are not looking promising for the route, and there will have to be extensive subterranean work to try and limit, or better still eliminate this, or else we will have a speed restricted high speed line. As for the cost of this, nobody yet knows, hence my scepticism about this northern extension.

Kind regards
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Last edited by Mr Mac; 4th May 2020 at 14:42.
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Old 4th May 2020, 14:34
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Mr Mac

the sheer volume of old coal workings in the area.
And in years past, on the WCML around Wigan, for the same reason.

And, it is interesting to note that there has not been a real reply to Sallyanne's #18 of July21st 2017 on where al the electricity is coming from.....I doubt it will be renewables even if every electric car is discharging into the network, while I shudder to think of the EM pollution all the doubtless inadequately filtered invertors will produce...Big PV installations are notoriously poor on EMC, as manufacturers appear not to give a toss about the EMC Directive and Ofcom do not want to know.

Will it be a case of

"When the sun doesn't shine and the wind doesn't blow
What will make HS2 go?"
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Old 4th May 2020, 22:28
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"When the sun doesn't shine and the wind doesn't blow
What will make HS2 go?"
The hot air already expended in trying to justify it, perhaps?
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Old 5th May 2020, 12:43
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Originally Posted by RedhillPhil View Post
Plenty of graves were dug up and the remains re-interred when St. Pancras was being extended for HS1. It's nothing new.
All of the above comments emphatically make the case for cremation rather than interment. Why we persist with this corruption of the countryside when there is a completely hygienic method of disposal which doesn't render portions of the countryside unusable is beyond me.

Every time I raise a glass of water to my lips I wonder how many bodies have filtered it.
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