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Very Large Ore Carrier goes missing

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Very Large Ore Carrier goes missing

Old 2nd Apr 2017, 22:53
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Very Large Ore Carrier goes missing

S Korean cargo ship Stellar Daisy vanishes in South Atlantic - BBC News
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Old 2nd Apr 2017, 23:38
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Hope crew managed to hit lifeboats.

Iron ore. Reminds me of Gordon Lightfoot.

Waiting for more news.
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Old 2nd Apr 2017, 23:42
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Vanished is the new sunk. Yes, Edmund.
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Old 3rd Apr 2017, 01:17
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This really terrifies me: how could such a big ship go missing?
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Old 3rd Apr 2017, 01:24
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Not sure whether due to this - but in general regarding large ships going missing - be afraid.
Very afraid.
The BBC Horizon documentary on these things was absolutely terrifying.
And all grounded in cold, hard scientific fact.
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Old 3rd Apr 2017, 01:26
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Originally Posted by rotornut View Post
This really terrifies me: how could such a big ship go missing?
This is how easy

The sinking of MV Derbyshire - Merseyside Maritime Museum, Liverpool museums

The Derbyshire has entered history for doing exactly that.....they did find her eventually and was surmised as having a design fault, chances are this latest one to founder will possibly have the exact same issues
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Old 3rd Apr 2017, 01:32
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Somewhere I read some facts and figures regarding the number of large and very large ships that disappear every year, now thought to be caused by said rogue waves.
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Old 3rd Apr 2017, 03:00
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What's so surprising about rogue waves is that until relatively recently, scientists thought they knew most of what there was to know about wave theory.
Then the Draupner Wave happened - and they discovered something entirely unforseen at a fundamental theoretical level.
And that's only in 1995.
They've since recently confirmed optical rogue waves as well.
The really scary bit in the doco is the German scientist who booked satellite imaging time - and after examining the world's oceans from orbit, found traces of numerous rogue waves across the surfaces of the world's seas.
They're out there.
And they can exert a force of 100 tonnes per square metre - enough to shatter steel.
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Old 3rd Apr 2017, 03:23
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Many years ago I served as a Radio Officer on a bulk iron ore run on a cargo ship. The iron ore was just poured into the hold and sat in a pyramid shape at the bottom. The ship was right down on the marks with about ten feet from the deck to the waterline. The cargo only filled about 5% of the hold, the rest was just empty space and most of it well below the water line. The cargo was constantly checked for shifting and hold inspections looking for leaks had to be done using breathing apparatus because the iron ore absorbed oxygen from the air. I can't think of a more dangerous cargo other than aviation spirit or explosives.

Several things could go wrong in heavy weather, the cargo could shift to one side and roll the ship over or cause a severe list, a large wave could roll over the bow and lift or smash the first hatch cover nearest the bow, or the ore could rust in the presence of sea water and generate enough heat to catch alight.

If the first hold at the bow flooded, because of the weight of the cargo, the ship would just carry on bow down under the water with successive hatches blowing and holds flooding. Perhaps 45 seconds until the ship was totally beneath the surface.

For that trip, the lifeboat radio was just loose next to the radio room door and everyone slept fully dressed with cabin doors locked open. Not that it would have made any difference if a rogue wave had hit the ship.
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Old 3rd Apr 2017, 05:17
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Ship Structure Committee: Case Study II: DERBYSHIRE
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Old 3rd Apr 2017, 06:30
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From that report:-

Every year 10 to 20 bulk carrier losses occur, where structural failure might be the cause, (Ref. 2).
Bloody Hell!!
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Old 3rd Apr 2017, 06:51
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I once worked with a chap who had been a fleet manager for bulk carriers and oil tankers. He told me a story about a bulk carrier that sank off Australia in heavy seas. The radio op was actually talking to their local office when the ship sank and it went down so quickly that the radio op was cut off in mid-sentence...... Power failure or sudden rush of water we will never know.
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Old 3rd Apr 2017, 06:56
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Oil tanker "Kirki" that lost its bow off the West Australian coast.



https://www.amsa.gov.au/environment/...irki/index.asp

Read a book many years ago about the safety aspects of VLCC, and the author (qualified Captain) was of the opinion that one of the chief problems was that the bridge crew were too far removed from what was happening at the bow, the impact the sea was having, and the stress that the ship is enduring ie you may need to slow down. The largest ULCC is 1,503 feet in length. Not helped by tight scheduling practices. Had much to say about design also ie only one engine for propulsion.
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Old 3rd Apr 2017, 07:28
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Originally Posted by megan View Post
Oil tanker "Kirki" that lost its bow off the West Australian coast.

Read a book many years ago about the safety aspects of VLCC, and the author (qualified Captain) was of the opinion that one of the chief problems was that the bridge crew were too far removed from what was happening at the bow, the impact the sea was having, and the stress that the ship is enduring ie you may need to slow down. The largest ULCC is 1,503 feet in length. Not helped by tight scheduling practices. Had much to say about design also ie only one engine for propulsion.
On a 150.000 tdw tanker built in 1980 we had at least three hull stress indicators on the bridge.
If nearing red sector, reduce power.
Wrongly loaded, ballasted, maintained, operated, designed, constructed. Take your pick.
When a ore carrier goes, she goes fast.
Check out Berge Istra and Berge Vanga.
Different scenario as they were OBOs, but same result.
Per
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Old 3rd Apr 2017, 08:22
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The only surprise in this news is that it Is News ! Many large cargo vessels of this type (though not necessarily this size) break up and sink every year losing on average 15 to 20 crew with no publicity whatsoever. crews being mostly poorly paid originating from the far east. Owners of the often badly maintained vessels hide behind lawyers with ships registered under 'Flags of Convenience'. On the rare occasions that a ship undergoes an inspection the surveyors, maybe two men have 24 to 48 hrs to thoroughly inspect a ship the size of a cathedral, impossible. Ore carriers are among the most lethal.
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Old 3rd Apr 2017, 09:32
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Sailors have known of "rogue waves" for centuries. During one of the Russian convoys (JW53 Feb 1943) a rogue wave ripped the top off the forward gun turret of the cruiser HMS Sheffield. It was said that without the protection of the two forward turrets, the whole forward upper-works would have been torn off and the ship sent to the bottom - bear in mind that Sheffield had an armoured hull and deck.
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Old 3rd Apr 2017, 13:57
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My mother was on a passenger ship that was hit by a rogue wave in the middle of the night in the 1930s. She said it was a very scary experience. I have a picture of the damage to the front of the superstructure when the wave came over the bow of the ship.
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Old 3rd Apr 2017, 14:01
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Many large cargo vessels of this type (though not necessarily this size) break up and sink every year losing on average 15 to 20 crew with no publicity whatsoever
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...wrecks_in_2017

(other years are available)
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Old 3rd Apr 2017, 16:28
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Originally Posted by rotornut View Post
My mother was on a passenger ship that was hit by a rogue wave in the middle of the night in the 1930s. She said it was a very scary experience. I have a picture of the damage to the front of the superstructure when the wave came over the bow of the ship.

Sounds similar to what happened here then to the Michelangelo in 1966 when she was hit head on by a rogue wave

Michelangelo accident
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Old 3rd Apr 2017, 18:35
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Originally Posted by rottenray View Post
Hope crew managed to hit lifeboats.

Iron ore. Reminds me of Gordon Lightfoot.

Waiting for more news.
The loss of the Edmund Fitzgerald on the Great Lakes.....very tragic.......
memorably descibed in song by Gordon Lightfoot.
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