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Tesla and Lithium

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Tesla and Lithium

Old 2nd Mar 2018, 14:07
  #981 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by G-CPTN View Post
I wonder how many all-electric cars there were among those trapped yesterday from mid-morning to and including overnight in the snowdrifts on the 30 miles of the A1 yesterday?
Good point - what happens to electric cars that get stuck and then run out of power. Do they have to be put on a tow truck and transported to the nearest recharge station or is there a portable power pack system that can fast recharge them when they are away from the grid.
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Old 2nd Mar 2018, 14:54
  #982 (permalink)  
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I haven't been able to quantify the number of vehicles that were trapped within the 30 mile section, but imagine the effect of low ambient temperature and demands for heat during 24 hours stuck in a snow drift - future events will require convoys of recovery vehicles or some 'instant' recharge facility.

I would be interested to learn how long a charge would last if used for heating the interior overnight in freezing temperatures.
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Old 2nd Mar 2018, 19:08
  #983 (permalink)  
 
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The BMW I3 comes with a range extender option, which is a small engine and generator to provide electricity should the batteries not have enough charge.

With most electric cars having a fairly small range, I don't know why more EVs don't have them. It's helped me out on a number of occasions when the power has gone down much quicker than expected.
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Old 2nd Mar 2018, 21:19
  #984 (permalink)  
 
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i3 Forum.

https://speakev.com/forums/bmw-i3/ Looks like it's best to keep the car in warranty!
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Old 2nd Mar 2018, 21:35
  #985 (permalink)  

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I wonder how many all-electric cars there were among those trapped yesterday from mid-morning to and including overnight in the snowdrifts on the 30 miles of the A1 yesterday?
A colleague of mine also owns a Tesla and came in laughing this morning having accidentally left the heating on in the car at around 22C overnight. Around 14 hours. It cost him 50 miles of his normal 250 mile cold weather range. His range in warm weather (like mine) is around 300 miles. Temperatures below freezing cost about 20 - 25% range.

Good point - what happens to electric cars that get stuck and then run out of power. Do they have to be put on a tow truck and transported to the nearest recharge station or is there a portable power pack system that can fast recharge them when they are away from the grid.
Teslas have to be transported. You have to be particularly dumb to run out of juice. A bit like running out of diesel or petrol. The only difference is the consequence.

I have said before that using an electric car requires a small change of mindset and a little forward planning if a journey over 250 miles is planned. I drive a 106 mile round trip regularly at the moment. In 12 months of ownership I have charged away from home i.e. at a Tesla Supercharger twice in that time.

As reported by the UK's IET
Car manufacturers allegedly miss selling their range estimates
https://eandt.theiet.org/content/art...ge-mp-alleges/
That article cites Nissan only. The Leaf has an abysmal range as anybody who had done a modicum of research would know.

The new Jaguar is the first of many electric cars from the major established manufacturers who will kick Tesla into touch. Tesla have enjoyed monopolising the market as the only viable long range and completely practical large car. While mechanically ultra reliable the Tesla build quality does not match the excessive price. They also lack the design of the established car makers e.g. little internal storage space, no coat hooks, etc.

I have done around 13,000 miles and the car still makes me smile every time I drive it.
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Old 21st Mar 2018, 07:19
  #986 (permalink)  
 
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The New Leaf looks as if Nissan is finally addressing those 'abysmal' range concerns. The latest generation certainly has the looks.
Will they also add a small engine generator for battery top-up, something borrowed from their Note e-Power, or BMW I3 even?
https://electrek.co/2018/01/04/nissa...ange-charging/
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Old 30th Mar 2018, 07:30
  #987 (permalink)  
 
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This thread has gone pretty silent recently.


Have any members here received their new Model 3?
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Old 30th Mar 2018, 13:23
  #988 (permalink)  
 
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With more people driving the things then there's more chance of them joining the rest in the average statistics category. I've not heard if the computer was to blame just yet.

The post crash photo shows the cabin intact which is impressive considering it hit an immovable concrete barrier. Apparently it also caught fire however it burnt according to its design - slowly, and was not a threat to emergency workers who had time to remove the victim.
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Old 30th Mar 2018, 15:45
  #989 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by yotty View Post
https://speakev.com/forums/bmw-i3/ Looks like it's best to keep the car in warranty!
Having had a quick scan of that link I like it when the costs of an extra years warrantry are that same as I paid capital cost for my last IC car
Comedy gold
Not to worry I'm sure EV are going to be cheaper to run overall than IC's...one day.
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Old 30th Mar 2018, 15:57
  #990 (permalink)  
 
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I loved one of the comments from yotty's link about buying a BMW EV -

"I'm interested in the tech, want to do something towards a cleaner environment and wanted to get engaged in the change that is happening. But on many other counts it makes no sense whatsoever,"
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Old 30th Mar 2018, 19:40
  #991 (permalink)  
 
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I've seen several items along the line of 'if you're getting an electric car, lease, don't buy'. Apparently the resale values of most EVs has been dropping like a rock. This is because the technology is advancing so fast, even a three year old car is considered horribly obsolete.
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Old 31st Mar 2018, 08:38
  #992 (permalink)  
 
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In the following article Nissan say they are addressing the problem of resale of EV vehicles, by refurbishing old batteries.
https://japantoday.com/category/tech...o-EV-batteries
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Old 31st Mar 2018, 22:56
  #993 (permalink)  
 
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Another Tesla death

Tesla in fatal crash driving on autopilot | Euronews
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Old 31st Mar 2018, 23:32
  #994 (permalink)  
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I saw my first stationary Tesla Model S P90 parked in our village this evening.
Unfortunately there was no driver (or anyone else) present and I was hurrying somewhere, so I only had time to read the model and grade and couldn't examine the detail of the visible features.
I heard today that our region has the largest concentration of EV charging points (the number I recall was one in 458 users - bearing in mind we are in Nissan Leaf country (the Sunderland factory is only 30 miles away).

I have seen other makes and models of EVs (such as BMW and Renault) as well as Leafs.
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Old 31st Mar 2018, 23:47
  #995 (permalink)  

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I am not sure why a Tesla crashing and the driver being killed is much different from any other crash where a car crashes and kills the driver?

There is insufficient information to know what role the 'autopilot' played.

The system is clever in that it senses if hands are not gripping the wheel. From my experiments it will give a warning which increases in intensity if it senses no hands and will immediately start slowing down. If it does not detect hands on the wheel despite the warnings it will stop the car and put on the hazard lights.

There are repeated warnings in the handbook that the driver must be ready to take control at any time. Therein lies its danger in my view because humans are very poor at prolonged monitoring of automatic systems.

Personally I only use the function in stop start heavy traffic where it reduces the monotony and burden of physically starting and stopping the car.

The previous few posts mostly demonstrate a desire to confirm the writer's prejudice against EVs and I really cannot be bothered to argue the points made.

The last post refers to charging points. Take a look at this map. Also bear in mind that most EV owners routinely charge at home or at work.
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Old 1st Apr 2018, 01:27
  #996 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by M.Mouse View Post
I am not sure why a Tesla crashing and the driver being killed is much different from any other crash where a car crashes and kills the driver?

There is insufficient information to know what role the 'autopilot' played.
Tesla have confirmed the autopilot was engaged. The question that raises is why did the autopilot navigate into the concrete barrier in the first place?

There were other reports that Tesla's (the same car??) had swerved towards that barrier in the past but been ignored by Tesla.

Regardless of failing in the autopilot system, ultimate responsibility lays with the driver who should have been watching what was going on. Even more reprehensible was that the driver ignored the warnings from the AP system.

Last edited by Dee Vee; 1st Apr 2018 at 01:55.
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Old 1st Apr 2018, 08:53
  #997 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by M.Mouse View Post
The last post refers to charging points. Take a look at this map. Also bear in mind that most EV owners routinely charge at home or at work.
I rarely charge away from home. The only occasions I have is when staying away and there's been a charging point I could use, like our last short break, where there were two charging points in the hotel parking garage.

It's pretty rare to not be able to charge somewhere when away, even if it's a slow charge, I've found. We stayed in a self-catering place about 18 months ago that had an outdoor socket, so even there I managed to get an overnight charge that was more than enough for the next day's use.

I think there's a load of unnecessary worry over charging, because people are obsessed with the "filling station refuelling" model. That will change as EVs become more common (in fact it's already changing) as most EV users will charge at home and at their destination. It'll take time for destinations like hotels, car parks, work places etc to get charging points, but it's already happening.
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Old 1st Apr 2018, 09:02
  #998 (permalink)  
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Do you have to pay for charging your EV at hotels?
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Old 1st Apr 2018, 09:15
  #999 (permalink)  
 
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I like this dismissive attitude to oh well you mostly charge at home anyway...
Its all very well for me and the rest of you who have off street parking and often double garages.

Around 30% of the Uk's housing stock has no off street parking at all. They have to park wherever they can on the street often 100 yards or more away from home - how are they suppose to manage to charge at home?
They can't.

It is one reason why as a previous poster put it EV's are simply not a practical possibility as a sole car to own/lease for many even before we consider the range/likely journey lengths the owners are going to be doing.
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Old 1st Apr 2018, 09:20
  #1000 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by dsc810 View Post
I like this dismissive attitude to oh well you mostly charge at home anyway...
Its all very well for me and the rest of you who have off street parking and often double garages.

Around 30% of the Uk's housing stock has no off street parking at all. They have to park wherever they can on the street often 100 yards or more away from home - how are they suppose to manage to charge at home?
They can't.

It is one reason why as a previous poster put it EV's are simply not a practical possibility as a sole car to own/lease for many even before we consider the range/likely journey lengths the owners are going to be doing.

And, as already mentioned at least once, there are several schemes to fit charging points at the roadside in such areas, from the wireless charging scheme that Nissan have come up with to adapting street lights as charge points.

It will happen, it'll just take time to adapt, much as it took time for filling stations to be built across the country when conventional cars started to grow in popularity.

The current filling station network has had over 100 years to develop; electric cars have been with us for less than a decade.
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