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Tesla and Lithium

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Tesla and Lithium

Old 2nd Nov 2017, 11:48
  #941 (permalink)  
 
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If/when these become consumer reality you can stick 'em over your existing solar panels and make even more power.

Transparent solar technology represents 'wave of the future' | MSUToday | Michigan State University
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Old 2nd Nov 2017, 14:09
  #942 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by cattletruck View Post
If/when these become consumer reality you can stick 'em over your existing solar panels and make even more power.

Transparent solar technology represents 'wave of the future' | MSUToday | Michigan State University
I gotta wonder about some of the math used in this article. It states:

"But in terms of overall electricity potential, the authors note that there is an estimated 5 billion to 7 billion square meters of glass surface in the United States. And with that much glass to cover, transparent solar technologies have the potential of supplying some 40 percent of energy demand in the U.S. – about the same potential as rooftop solar units. “The complimentary deployment of both technologies,” Lunt said, “could get us close to 100 percent of our demand if we also improve energy storage.”

A LOT of windows are specifically designed to NOT receive direct solar radiation. In my house for example only one window in the entire house is in direct sunshine, and then only for about an hour just before dusk. Office towers might be a good application for this technology, but even then only one or two surfaces of the tower receive direct sunlight. And providing "40 percent of energy demand in the U.S." using solar panels sounds like a mighty iffy proposition at night.
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Old 2nd Nov 2017, 15:54
  #943 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by KenV View Post
A LOT of windows are specifically designed to NOT receive direct solar radiation. In my house for example only one window in the entire house is in direct sunshine, and then only for about an hour just before dusk. Office towers might be a good application for this technology, but even then only one or two surfaces of the tower receive direct sunlight. And providing "40 percent of energy demand in the U.S." using solar panels sounds like a mighty iffy proposition at night.
Probably, but maybe enough to trickle charge some of the Tesla's parked in the parking garage, to try and get this thread back on topic.
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Old 2nd Nov 2017, 16:02
  #944 (permalink)  
 
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In The Times today:-
Bottlenecks leave Tesla Model 3 stuck in slow lane
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Old 2nd Nov 2017, 21:30
  #945 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Lyneham Lad View Post
A similar article last week in the Seattle paper said they've averaged building 3 Model 3s per day.
If they don't figure it out, it's going to take a while to clear that 400,000 backlog
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Old 3rd Nov 2017, 01:11
  #946 (permalink)  
 
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A bigger problem for Tesla is the proposed withdrawal of the Electric Car Tax Credit -

Availability of the credit has been capped at the first 200,000 qualifying vehicles sold by each manufacturer. No automaker has reached that cap yet.
“That will stop any electric vehicle market in the U.S., apart from sales of the highly expensive Tesla Model S,” said Xavier Mosquet, senior partner at consultant Boston Consulting Group, who authored a study on the growth of battery powered vehicles. “There’s no Tesla 3, no Bolt, no Leaf in a market without incentives.”
A premature end could have outsized impact for Tesla, which is striving to scale up production of its least expensive electric car, the $35,000 Model 3 sedan. The company has said it has hundreds of thousands of would-be buyers holding reservations for the vehicle.
Tax credit for Tesla, other electric cars axed in GOP bill - SFGate
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Old 3rd Nov 2017, 01:57
  #947 (permalink)  
 
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How many waiting US citizens will potentially be affected by this credit axe? There must be many worldwide customers who have placed orders.
Anyway, I thought Triplane Trump was wanting to put America first and protect American industry. China will take the electric car market now. Maybe Trump thinks Elon Musk is a Martian or something?
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Old 3rd Nov 2017, 09:34
  #948 (permalink)  
 
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Here is an interesting article about Tesla: Here's the true cost of buying a Tesla Model 3
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Old 7th Nov 2017, 11:39
  #949 (permalink)  
 
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That article says nothing useful at all. It says that Tesla 3 comes in a base model at a certain price, and if you get all the optional extras, you pay almost twice as much. That applies more or less to pretty much any car on the market. I looked up Toyota Corolla and Camry, which both have 50% worth of extras.
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Old 11th Nov 2017, 18:38
  #950 (permalink)  

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An interesting explanation of the way a Tesla works and why, in my view, the technology will play a big part in the future of transportation



This one comes shows some interesting findings regarding battery life. The batteries can, courtesy of Tesla's Gigafactory in Nevada, be completely recycled and most components reused.

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Old 1st Dec 2017, 07:50
  #951 (permalink)  
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Tesla mega-battery in Australia activated.
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Old 1st Dec 2017, 09:35
  #952 (permalink)  

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An interesting read about Tesla and software.
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Old 1st Dec 2017, 12:11
  #953 (permalink)  
 
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Interesting but concerning - there is apparently no partitioning between safety-critical and non-safety-critical functions in code or hardware. That's something of a schoolboy error, and it's clear that the author of the article doesn't know what a "systems approach" means.

PDR
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Old 1st Dec 2017, 16:02
  #954 (permalink)  
 
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Tesla mega battery.. it can power 30,000 homes for a whole hour.. not really the Hinckley point b then
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Old 1st Dec 2017, 18:26
  #955 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by PDR1 View Post
Interesting but concerning - there is apparently no partitioning between safety-critical and non-safety-critical functions in code or hardware. That's something of a schoolboy error, and it's clear that the author of the article doesn't know what a "systems approach" means.

PDR
It's insane. I worked on a programme where we were trying to gain assurance that the software in the various integrated systems would meet some pretty tough (but not as tough as a car, in many respects) operating conditions in a fairly difficult environment. A single central system could never come close to being either reliable, or more importantly proven to be reliable.

Toyota wrote a small book (bit strange to read, I accept) that was handed out to every new Prius purchaser back when the car was launched. I still have mine, it has the rather unedifying title "The Prius that Shook the World". It's not an easy read, and is full of direct Japanese to English translation that makes you appreciate how important rank in an organisation is in Japanese companies, but that aside, it does deal well with the thorny problem of how you prove the reliability of drive by wire steering, drive by wire engine controls, drive by wire braking and all the background, but safety critical, functions, like running the electric transmission system, or the battery management system, or even the mundane, like the driver's displays.

Toyota approached this in the same way that many aircraft manufacturers do. They broke down the functions to "black boxes", with a known, and wholly predictable, set of input/output conditions. Each of these separate "black boxes could then be 100% tested, something that is near-impossible with a single integrated system, as running through every possible combination of sensor and actuated component conditions would take decades of test time.

The other worrying aspect is that a car like a Tesla is a fair bit more complex than something like a desktop PC or tablet. Desktop PCs and tablets have been around a long time, yet they still have a pretty dire reliability record. Even very mature desktop software is still having bugs ironed out. As my old IT manager used to say, never even think of switching to a new operating system until it is at least three or four years old, or else you will encounter a fair bit of pain and grief as you are used as the final product testing service.
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Old 1st Dec 2017, 18:54
  #956 (permalink)  
 
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The article does create a false impression that a Tesla is a single computer. It is not.

There are 64 separate computers in a Model S. Dunno about the Model X, but I'd guess it's similar.

Of course they are separated from eachother.

It is not a single computer and the non-safety critical systems, such as the brakes, are not conflated with relatively frivolous stuff like the stereo or the air-con. With hundreds or thousands of millions of customer miles, any such problem would have shown itself by now.

There are vulnerabilities though. A relatively simple hackers loophole was exposed, and closed, a year or two ago.

I don't suppose there are many mass-produced computer systems which haven't been hacked at some level.

The huge advantage that the Tesla guys had over the dinosaur companies was that they were able to start with a clear white screen on their CAD system and they did not have to shoe-horn an electric car into the form factor of a coal or oil burner.

Another advantage was that the original core team were electronics people, not mechanical engineers with dirty fingernails.

That advantage came at a the price which has been shown by the fact that they're a bit crap at production engineering. A "mass" production rate of a dozen Model 3s a day in October, with a customer waiting list of half a million, shows that problem rather well.
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Old 1st Dec 2017, 19:40
  #957 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Cazalet33 View Post
The article does create a false impression that a Tesla is a single computer. It is not.

There are 64 separate computers in a Model S. Dunno about the Model X, but I'd guess it's similar.

Of course they are separated from eachother.

It is not a single computer and the non-safety critical systems, such as the brakes, are not conflated with relatively frivolous stuff like the stereo or the air-con. With hundreds or thousands of millions of customer miles, any such problem would have shown itself by now.

There are vulnerabilities though. A relatively simple hackers loophole was exposed, and closed, a year or two ago.

I don't suppose there are many mass-produced computer systems which haven't been hacked at some level.

The huge advantage that the Tesla guys had over the dinosaur companies was that they were able to start with a clear white screen on their CAD system and they did not have to shoe-horn an electric car into the form factor of a coal or oil burner.

Another advantage was that the original core team were electronics people, not mechanical engineers with dirty fingernails.

That advantage came at a the price which has been shown by the fact that they're a bit crap at production engineering. A "mass" production rate of a dozen Model 3s a day in October, with a customer waiting list of half a million, shows that problem rather well.
Maybe they needed more of those mechanical engineers, the one’s you have gratuitously insulted, in the original core team. Maybe their experience may have led to something more effective to build on a mass production basis.
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Old 1st Dec 2017, 19:47
  #958 (permalink)  
 
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I don't think they've got a design problem with either the Model S or Model X, nor even with the Model 3.

I think they've got a production engineering problem with the basic mechanical engineering problems of production engineering on the assembly line. Really elementary stuff like getting body parts properly aligned and getting as smooth a paint finish as befits a 100k motor car.
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Old 2nd Dec 2017, 03:50
  #959 (permalink)  
 
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Ahh yes, the Tesla Mega Battery...

South Australia heads back 100 years to diesel (with battery back up) « JoNova
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Old 2nd Dec 2017, 03:56
  #960 (permalink)  
 
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Well, from reports and Tesla information during investor calls the bottleneck is actually not the car manufacturing process, it is the battery situation which probably might have been made worse by a bet to install the worlds largest battery within 3 months in a rather isolated southern hemisphere continent. And of course some production problems in that nevada based battery factory as well.

They hired a quite experienced car guy last year to get production issues sorted who was formerly responsible for the production of Audi A4, A5 and Q5 series.
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