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Endangered skills

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Endangered skills

Old 8th Aug 2015, 06:54
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Endangered skills



SKILLS CONSIDERED ESSENTIAL IN MODERN DAY LIFE
1. Searching the Internet
2. Using/ connecting to WiFi
3. Using a smart phone
4. Online banking
5. Knowing about privacy setting online
6. Searching and applying for jobs inline
7. Being able to turn water off at the mains
8. Using and following a sat-nav
9. Updating, installing computer programs
10. Working a tablet


A study by Ordnance Survey, from DWail for the funny table-format. I'd have trouble with 3 and 9 and sadly am hopeless with 14 (and my own phone No) . Actually, I haven't baked bread, but I know people who have and can teach me how to, if I need to.

And I haven't acquired the 8 and haven't had the need for 6.
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Old 8th Aug 2015, 08:14
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Some things are just getting to the point of pointlessness due to obsolescence, but we're truly screwed if our computerised world should falter. PPRuNe for starters

I'm more concerned at how quickly the hoof have immersed themselves in virtual worlds at the expense of the very real world around them. I hiked up a medium sized mountain the other day and when at the top there were 3 others, 2 looking at the fantastic views, the younger other (adult) on their iPhone completely and excitedly immersed in the FaceAche that was now possible due to signal strength over the mobile network. FYI LOL OMG YOLO, except for this person that life is predominantly virtual.


SHJ
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Old 8th Aug 2015, 08:26
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Despite my "old fart" age grouping, I'm reasonably IT literate, to the point of building my own desktops.
However, after 17 solid years of computer use, I recently started to become alarmed at my handwriting deterioration skills (along with general body deterioration, too of course!).
As a result, I have resorted to keeping a handwritten daily diary (which I used to do for many years).
This keeps up my handwriting skills and leaves my memories in a format that at least will not become technically obsolete, have memory or chip failure, or not be able to be read by current electronic machines.
I trust that reading handwriting doesn't join the initial list!

All my friends my age have technical skills that are all rapidly becoming obsolete. Manual machining and gearcutting, repair skills and techniques for many items, morse code transmitting ability, analogue equipment, the list goes on and on.
Add the ability to drive a manual transmission as No. 21 - soon to be followed by never having had to learn how to drive a motor vehicle.

I often wonder what archaeologists in 2000 yrs will make of our 21st century society. There will be nothing durable left after 2000 yrs to examine and make important pronunciations about!
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Old 8th Aug 2015, 08:27
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Was recently left shaking my head by a guy who had absolutely no concept of North, South, East & West.

He got up & down, and left and right ok.

Unbelievable.
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Old 8th Aug 2015, 08:35
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Happy that I can do most of those things, although it's a long time since I've done 4 or18, and never learned to do 17 or 19, although my "seek and destroy" typing is fast enough to keep up with my thinking (which may say a lot).

The good thing is that my 8yo granddaughter is coming along nicely with 2, 3 (fishing & boating with her father), 5, 8, 11, 14 and 16 (bushwalks with Pop).

To the list, I'd add hand-cutting dovetails and hand-planing a wide board flat.
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Old 8th Aug 2015, 08:37
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Was darning socks ever a skill? Surely nobody needs to do that ever again.
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Old 8th Aug 2015, 08:38
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Making a paper aeroplane!

Changing a flat tyre

Changing a blown light bulb

Fixing a leaky tap

No reason to learn to do these things when you can pay someone else to do it for you
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Old 8th Aug 2015, 08:41
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Was recently left shaking my head by a guy who had absolutely no concept of North, South, East & West.
I found out some years ago that this includes Travel Agents!

I was on the phone to a Travel Agent and reading a map, the Agent was giving me directions to a small town that I couldn't locate.

The problem was solved when I worked out that she had confused East with West
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Old 8th Aug 2015, 08:43
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Was darning socks ever a skill?
I bought a small machine from the NAAFI, it allowed the user to weave a patch that was stitched over the hole.
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Old 8th Aug 2015, 08:44
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I use Google regularly, but in my own field (medals and militaria) I find that the large collection of reference books I have built up over the years is invaluable, and far more likely, say, to come up with the identification of an obscure item than an internet search. Done them all, 1-20, but must admit the bread I made was only useful as a doorstop! Re cutting dovetails, when I displayed my first attempt at making a picture frame, my brother (a skilled joiner) remarked that I should use a sharper penknife to cut my mitres next time! I left it to him thereafter.

As an aside, why do users here persist in using terms such a "Goo-Goo", "a large South American River", "flea bay" etc. Is it considered bad form to use the correct names of these internet services? If it's a joke I suppose it was mildly amusing - the first time!
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Old 8th Aug 2015, 08:48
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Originally Posted by Lantern10 View Post
Was recently left shaking my head by a guy who had absolutely no concept of North, South, East & West.

He got up & down, and left and right ok.

Unbelievable.
Every time I get into a taxi/cab,for amusement,I ask the driver if we are N,S,E or W of the city CBD ( population of city: 3.5 million).I always get blank looks,they have no idea.It's all on their 'navigator' as they call it

Many younger people cannot cook or clean at all.They couldn't name 10% of the fruit + veggies in the supermarket either.
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Old 8th Aug 2015, 08:51
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Our species is just preparing itself for return to the trees.
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Old 8th Aug 2015, 09:22
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Was darning socks ever a skill? Surely nobody needs to do that ever again.
Have done so fairly recently. Also other items - for example hessian sacks after the meece had attacked the spuds therein.

Noted that a thirty-ish "celeb" admitted recently (on TV, what a pillock) that he didn't know how to blow his nose or read time on an analogue clock.
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Old 8th Aug 2015, 09:29
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Some of those essential skills are horribly reminiscent of the jolly old Imperial measurements. Hence the UK, instead of fully embracing metric, which, lets face it, is a far more simplistic system, happily continues with a hybrid.

Technological advancements are simply progress, however, how people choose to use this developments is disturbing in that they become reliant on them. Use what you have to, but, the KISS principle does have several benefits, notably when technology fails.

Electrical plugs, well the UK population, and others, did have a quaint habit of electrocuting themselves even when it was a basic requirement to be able to do so thus the moulded plug...an EU directive I believe ??...has its benefits.

Maps...invaluable even today with sat.nav.

Sat nav is useful for the last part of a journey into an unknown area, but, given the development of road signage over the years, do you really need sat.nav for most journeys ?.....erm, no.

One notes that thinking for yourself was not included in the list however.

One would opine this is an essential skill.
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Old 8th Aug 2015, 10:22
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do you really need sat.nav for most journeys ?
In order to find my way, no, but I find it invaluable in giving the passenger something to do and keeping her out of my hair (what little remains of it).
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Old 8th Aug 2015, 10:26
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Hence the UK, instead of fully embracing metric, which, lets face it, is a far more simplistic system, happily continues with a hybrid.
Which is very useful at times. When measuring for DIY, I use the side of the tape which comes out 'exact0-est'. 12" is easier to mark and cut than 30 and a bit cm. With my vision!

CG
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Old 8th Aug 2015, 10:35
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Originally Posted by henry_crun View Post
Lot of young folk nowadays can't even build mammoth traps.
Guilty. I've lost that skill, for sure.
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Old 8th Aug 2015, 10:37
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Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: Swindon, Wilts,UK
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I learned to tie a drivers "Dolly Knot" years ago as an apprentice.
I still can't do it one handed like the guy who taught it to me but hay ho.
I was slightly surprised that a couple of my colleagues didn't know how to tie it, but then again they are sparkies!
I was even more surprised when delivering kit last week when one of the PhD students helping me unload the kit from the van announced he didn't know how a ratchet strap worked!

Originally Posted by henry_crun
Lot of young folk nowadays can't even build mammoth traps.
P.S. as Swindon is on a Mammoth migration route we get regular Mammoth incursions so we are quite adept at trapping them!
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Old 8th Aug 2015, 11:23
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1. Make fire
2. Find / purify water
3. Build shelter
4. Make weapons
5. Find food / hunt game
6. Skin game / butcher game / cook game
7. Make compass or plot star charts
8. Tan hides / make rope / make soap / evaporate salt
9. Dig clay / fire clay
10. Work out which rocks are harder than which other rocks

....if'n y'all can master the above, you'll live through to Day Two.

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Old 8th Aug 2015, 11:50
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sucking eggs

I think my grandmother knew how
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