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US Politics Hamsterwheel v2.0

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US Politics Hamsterwheel v2.0

Old 31st Jan 2019, 19:19
  #17341 (permalink)  
 
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“It isn't "western interests" who have been siphoning off the profits of the state oil company of Venezuela for the past two decades.”

Corruption within the government of Venezuela? Lack of spending on oil infrastructure?

Surely not. Next you will be telling me there is drinking going on within this establishment!

Of course there is corruption and infrastructure problems that are impacting the economy of Venezuaela. Such issues have been at play for many many decades.

But the serious damage is being done by the very specific and targeted economic sabotage being conducted from DC and London that ramped up under the Obama Administration.

What do you think has changed that now provides the impetus for this sabotage? Spoiler alert, it has to do with bitcoin, petrodollars, Russia and China.

Not human rights or democracy concerns.

Western world, when used to discuss geopolitics refers to the develped world and has nothing to do with geography.

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Old 31st Jan 2019, 20:20
  #17342 (permalink)  
 
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Why not use Franz Fanon's now-accepted, but somewhat dated terminology? (You can find it in his book The Wretched of the Earth.)

First World - The USA, Canada, the European Union, etc. These are the developed, capitalist democracies.

Second World - The former Soviet Union and the rest of the communist-ruled European countries. (This classification is somewhat dated, I think.)

Third World - The developing countries of Africa, Asia, and Latin America. one of which is Venezuela.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Develo..._Monetary_Fund
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Old 31st Jan 2019, 20:31
  #17343 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by chuks View Post
Why not use Franz Fanon's now-accepted, but somewhat dated terminology? (You can find it in his book The Wretched of the Earth.)

First World - The USA, Canada, the European Union, etc. These are the developed, capitalist democracies.

Second World - The former Soviet Union and the rest of the communist-ruled European countries. (This classification is somewhat dated, I think.)

Third World - The developing countries of Africa, Asia, and Latin America. one of which is Venezuela.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Develo..._Monetary_Fund
Don’t feed his paranoia Chuks.
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Old 31st Jan 2019, 21:08
  #17344 (permalink)  
 
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On my way home from Vietnam I visited an anti-war demo in Berkeley, still wearing my fatigues. Some college kid saw me taking pictures and asked me what I was doing. Of course I told him that the Army had sent me to keep an eye on things.

It really is surprising, how much the US government does know about the Third World. We used charts from the Defense Mapping Agency for navigation in the Third World, when they had a pretty good level of detail.

In fact, West Coast, I think I found Mr. Oicur's house on one of these new large-scale satellite images. (I used to work for the Army Security Agency, so that every so often someone sends me something that must have fallen out of a van hauling classified material.) What does "Target of Opportunity" mean, anyway?
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Old 31st Jan 2019, 22:09
  #17345 (permalink)  
 
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On my way home from Vietnam I visited an anti-war demo in Berkeley, still wearing my fatigues. Some college kid saw me taking pictures and asked me what I was doing.
I didn’t know Forrest Gump was based on a true story.
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Old 31st Jan 2019, 22:45
  #17346 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by West Coast View Post


I didn’t know Forrest Gump was based on a true story.
Dont care who you are, that’s funny.
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Old 31st Jan 2019, 22:53
  #17347 (permalink)  
 
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I preferred the coming back to the world scene in China Beach.
Dana and a few of the girls changing into civvies.
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Old 1st Feb 2019, 07:22
  #17348 (permalink)  

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Second World - The former Soviet Union and the rest of the communist-ruled European countries.

To which we will shortly be able to add the UK

Mac

PS: Anyone who reads Fanon these days is a good 50 years out of date.

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Old 1st Feb 2019, 08:29
  #17349 (permalink)  
 
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Franz Fanon's writings are very useful as background material, not that they are up to date. As a man of his time (he died in late 1961), why should we expect that he would have, demand that he should have, looked 50 years ahead? He did not even foresee what would come of the victory of the FLN over France in Algeria, let alone how the greater world would re-arrange itself 58 years on.

I think that many people in the Third World still follow Fanon's thoughts, and of course whenever we use the term, "the Third World" there we too are paying tribute to Fanon. Therefore it seems like a good idea to read the source material, to understand in some depth what "those people" are talking about.

It's pretty much the same as flinching whenever someone in the First World tells us nowadays that he's come up with a "final solution" to some problem. That man obviously has not done his homework to discover the origin of that term, in Hitler's "Endlösung der Judenfrage/Final Solution to the Jewish Question," meaning the Holocaust. If you use the term "the Third World" it is a very good idea to at least know where it came from.

When I was in school (I graduated High School in 1966) it was perceived wisdom among liberals that the Soviet Union should endure for the foreseeable future. We were expected, some of us, to go to Vietnam to fight Global Communism, of course. There we were following JFK's injunction to "Ask what you can do for your country." That was to be done with no expectation that there should be any real damage done to the USSR, though.

In fact, one arguable mistake was in one way we fought that war, aiming to avoid confrontation with the USSR and its allies. We did not seek to bar access by foreign shipping to North Vietnam. Instead of blocking weapons at their source we tried to stop them coming down the Ho Chi Minh trail. How much easier is it to stop a freighter with a belt of mines, compared to trying to hit some guy pushing a bicycle down a jungle trail?

Vietnam was going to be a mere proxy war fought against the USSR and Red China, part of our policy of "containment." Foreseeing the collapse and break-up of the mighty Soviet Union meant that you had to be a right wing wacko. Then you were someone who belonged in the John Birch Society and who took what he found in the Manchester Union-Leader for Gospel truth. (It seems crazy now, but a common belief then was that the USSR had to have vast gold reserves; its obvious debt burden meant nothing compared to all that gold. In reality the USSR was stony broke, but nobody reasonable believed that.)

A lot of the trouble with Trump seems to be that he's not just completely ignorant of world history and contemporary reality, but that he has no interest in being told about any of that. He's still going with his gut feelings, and never mind what his intelligence chiefs just told Congress. How is the man expected to form measured conclusions if he has no real knowledge of what is happening out there in the real world?

Fair enough, I would not expect a man of such limited intelligence and reading ability as Trump to plow through The Wretched of the Earth (Let's have a show of hands: how many here have read it?), but he should at least respect what he is told in his intelligence briefings.
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Old 1st Feb 2019, 09:59
  #17350 (permalink)  
 
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I've stripped out the superfluous words in your sentence in the interests of brevity and accuracy:

Originally Posted by chuks View Post
A lot of the trouble with Trump seems to be that he's not just completely ignorant
HTH,

PDR
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Old 1st Feb 2019, 10:50
  #17351 (permalink)  
 
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All trump has to say are some words he has never put together and uttered before.

"We need to improve southern border security with measures including physical barriers, other infrastructure and handling systems, personnel, and technology where they are appropriate. We, as government, need a plan and a budget for this requirement."

Instead we get this, like some showbiz orchestration of the next plot twist:

"President Donald Trump says congressional negotiations over border security are a "waste of time," while insisting he has "set the stage" to take action on his own if lawmakers don't provide funding for his border wall.
Trump tells The New York Times in an interview published Thursday night that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi "is hurting our country very badly by doing what's she doing and, ultimately, I think I've set the table very nicely."
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Old 1st Feb 2019, 11:58
  #17352 (permalink)  
 
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It's not rocket surgery to understand that Trump himself has threatened to close the southern border with immediate effect. Well, if he can do that without a wall, what does he need the wall for?

Then there is the way that this 30-foot high wall, according to Trump should be "almost impossible to climb over." The clear sense of that statement is that it should be possible to climb over. In fact, a bit of basic math should show that possibility: 30-foot wall + 40-foot ladder + 30-foot climbing rope = success! (He did not bother to tell us about another obvious possibility, tunneling under it. Set the wall ten feet deep, when it would be almost impossible to tunnel under unless you simply dug 12 feet deep.)

It's noticeable that a real test of the various sorts of wall has not been done. How about selecting teams from various gangs, such as MS-13, and let them have a go? Strict time limits, valuable prizes ... want to bet that none of the walls passes such a test?
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Old 1st Feb 2019, 16:03
  #17353 (permalink)  
 
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Didn't Need To Spend $5.7 billion, Either!

U.S. Border Patrol Reports Largest Fentanyl Bust of Nearly 254 Pounds of Opioid

ANITA SNOW / AP(PHOENIX) — U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials announced Thursday their biggest fentanyl bust ever, saying they captured nearly 254 pounds (114 kilograms) of the synthetic drug that is helping fueling a national epidemic of fatal opioid overdoses from a secret compartment inside a load of Mexican produce heading into Arizona.

The drug was found hidden Saturday morning in a compartment under the rear floor of a tractor-trailer after a scan during a secondary inspection indicated "some anomalies" in the load, and the agency's police dog team alerted officers to the presence of drugs, Nogales CBP Port Director Michael Humphries said.

Most of the seized fentanyl with an overall street value of about $3.5 million was in white powder form, but about 2 pounds of it (1 kilogram) was contained in pills. Agents also seized nearly 395 pounds (179 kilograms) of methamphetamine with a street value of $1.18 million, Humphries said.

"The size of a few grains of salt of fentanyl, which is a dangerous opioid, can kill a person very quickly," Humphries said. The seizure, he said, had prevented an immeasurable number of doses of the drug "that could have harmed so many families."

President Donald Trump praised the bust in a tweet Thursday, writing: "Our great U.S. Border Patrol Agents made the biggest Fentanyl bust in our Country's history. Thanks, as always, for a job well done!"

The Drug Enforcement Administration said the previous largest U.S. seizure of fentanyl had been in August 2017 when it captured 145 pounds (66 kilograms) of the drug in a Queens, New York, apartment that was linked to the Sinaloa Cartel. Before that, the largest recorded fentanyl seizure was 88 pounds (40 kilograms) nabbed from a pickup truck in Bartow County, Georgia.

Mexican traffickers have been increasingly smuggling the drug into the United States, mostly hidden in passenger vehicles and tractor-trailers trying to head through ports of entry in the Nogales, Arizona, and San Diego areas.

Doug Coleman, the DEA's special agent in charge for the Phoenix division, expressed admiration for size of the recent bust, emphasizing that it was not the product of any intelligence from his agency but rather "pure, old fashioned police work" by the agent who pulled the truck over.

"It was totally a cold hit" based on the agent's hunch, Coleman said.

Fentanyl has caused a surge in fatal overdoses around the U.S., including the 2016 accidental death of pop music legend Prince, who consumed the opioid in counterfeit pills that looked like the narcotic analgesic Vicodin.

U.S. law enforcement officials say the illicit version of the painkiller is now seen mostly as a white powder that can be mixed with heroin for an extra kick as well as blue pills that are counterfeits of prescription drugs like oxycodone.

The legal prescription form of the drug is used mostly to provide relief to cancer patients suffering unbearable pain at the end of their lives.

DEA officials have said that while 85 percent of the illicit fentanyl entering the United States from Mexico is seized at San Diego-area border crossings, an increasing amount is being detected on the border with Arizona, a state where the Sinaloa cartel controls the drug trade and fatal fentanyl overdoses are rising.

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says in a recent report that fentanyl is now the drug most often involved in fatal overdoses across the country, accounting for more than 18,000, or almost 29 percent, of the 63,000 overdose fatalities in 2016.


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Old 1st Feb 2019, 16:16
  #17354 (permalink)  
 
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From A Man Who Knows What Trump Doesn't Know

Democracy Post contributor

January 31 at 2:48 PMAfter caving on the shutdown, President Trump continues to insist that American taxpayers shell out $5.7 billion for a border wall (or is it a fence?) that he promised would be paid for by Mexico. There are many reasons to oppose Trump’s quixotic demand for a wall, but the most straightforward one is also the simplest: It won’t work. Trump’s wall would be a gargantuan boondoggle, an ineffective and expensive barrier that would likely displace rather than deter illegal crossings and cross-border smuggling. And that $5.7 billion Trump is demanding could be put to much better use to actually secure the border.

In the past, Trump has boasted that he has won political support because people realize that he knows “more about this stuff than anybody" when it comes to border security.

I suspect that Mike Vigil would beg to differ. Vigil served as the former head of international operations at the Drug Enforcement Administration. He spent three years as an undercover agent infiltrating drug cartels in Colombia and 13 years doing the same in Mexico. Vigil posed as a drug trafficker and won the confidence of drug lords. He nearly was killed taking down key players in the Guadalajara Cartel, the criminal network that murdered and tortured fellow DEA agent Kiki Camarena, one of Vigil’s friends. And then he oversaw all international narcotics operations for the largest anti-drug agency on the planet.

In short, he understands the world of traffickers on the southern border because he lived in it for decades. Trump often argues that the wall would stop drug trafficking. So I asked Vigil: Does he think that Trump’s wall would, in any way, limit the flow of drugs into the United States? He didn’t hesitate.

“Why would you want to toss billions of dollars on a useless project that would have absolutely zero impact? Zero impact. … It’s not going to stop anything. They’ll tunnel. They’ll punch holes in it and put French doors with stained glass on that wall. They’ll fly over it” (with cheap drones).

In fact, in areas where barriers already exist — or where drug traffickers worry they’ll be detected by existing surveillance measures — the cartels have developed advanced tunnels. Those tunnels sometimes even include sophisticated rail systems. Some are powered by solar energy. Others have complex ventilation and air-filtration systems. They often originate inside private homes on one side of the border and pop up inside a house on the other side, making policing them difficult.

Vigil told me that some drug kingpins, such as the notorious Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán Loera, who is on trial in New York, even sent engineers to Europe to study cutting-edge strategies used in German tunneling. He explained that those investments have unfortunately paid off, creating an extensive underground smuggling network that would not be affected by the creation of a wall on the desert soil above.

“If you took a giant knife and you sliced across the 2,000-mile U.S.-Mexico border, it would look like a block of Swiss cheese because it’s riddled with tunnels,” he said.

That doesn’t mean that border security is a Sisyphean task and that we should give up on it. It’s essential for national security and humanitarian justice to ensure that the government can properly patrol the southern border. But the first question lawmakers must ask themselves when disbursing billions of dollars is will this be a cost-effective way to spend this money? With Trump’s wall, the answer is clearly a resounding “no.”

Additional funds for smart border security could help, though. Vigil points to a few possible solutions: drones, ground sensors that are unattended and better camera systems (to name just a few). But with all of them, border security requires more personnel, so agents can actually tackle the problems they detect. The starting base salary for a border agent is $40,511, so $5.7 billion would go a long way. And more money could also be spent on Coast Guard operations. Officials have said their resources are stretched so thin that they can pursue only 20 percent of the leads that are generated by intelligence.

Vigil supports these ideas, but he also thinks the solution needs to focus on the drivers of illegal flows across the border, be it drugs or people, that come from countries such as Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. “I would put some of that money to help these countries combat this scourge that is afflicting their nations. Build up the judiciary, train the security forces, and that would go a long way.”

There are smart and stupid ways to approach border security. Trump’s wall is the stupid way. In negotiations with the White House, House Democrats should make that clear and explain why their plan will secure the border more effectively and at lower cost.
Turbine D is online now  
Old 1st Feb 2019, 17:19
  #17355 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
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Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. “I would put some of that money to help these countries combat this scourge that is afflicting their nations. Build up the judiciary, train the security forces, and that would go a long way.”
Historically, that never seems to work.
Corruption always rapidly creeps back into these and other third world countries very heavily, for the usual list of reasons.
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Old 1st Feb 2019, 17:54
  #17356 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
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Originally Posted by Turbine D View Post
Democracy Post contributor

January 31 at 2:48 PMAfter caving on the shutdown, President Trump continues to insist that American taxpayers shell out $5.7 billion for a border wall (or is it a fence?) that he promised would be paid for by Mexico. There are many reasons to oppose Trump’s quixotic demand for a wall, but the most straightforward one is also the simplest: It won’t work. Trump’s wall would be a gargantuan boondoggle, an ineffective and expensive barrier that would likely displace rather than deter illegal crossings and cross-border smuggling. And that $5.7 billion Trump is demanding could be put to much better use to actually secure the border.

In the past, Trump has boasted that he has won political support because people realize that he knows “more about this stuff than anybody" when it comes to border security.

I suspect that Mike Vigil would beg to differ. Vigil served as the former head of international operations at the Drug Enforcement Administration. He spent three years as an undercover agent infiltrating drug cartels in Colombia and 13 years doing the same in Mexico. Vigil posed as a drug trafficker and won the confidence of drug lords. He nearly was killed taking down key players in the Guadalajara Cartel, the criminal network that murdered and tortured fellow DEA agent Kiki Camarena, one of Vigil’s friends. And then he oversaw all international narcotics operations for the largest anti-drug agency on the planet.

In short, he understands the world of traffickers on the southern border because he lived in it for decades. Trump often argues that the wall would stop drug trafficking. So I asked Vigil: Does he think that Trump’s wall would, in any way, limit the flow of drugs into the United States? He didn’t hesitate.

“Why would you want to toss billions of dollars on a useless project that would have absolutely zero impact? Zero impact. … It’s not going to stop anything. They’ll tunnel. They’ll punch holes in it and put French doors with stained glass on that wall. They’ll fly over it” (with cheap drones).

In fact, in areas where barriers already exist — or where drug traffickers worry they’ll be detected by existing surveillance measures — the cartels have developed advanced tunnels. Those tunnels sometimes even include sophisticated rail systems. Some are powered by solar energy. Others have complex ventilation and air-filtration systems. They often originate inside private homes on one side of the border and pop up inside a house on the other side, making policing them difficult.

Vigil told me that some drug kingpins, such as the notorious Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán Loera, who is on trial in New York, even sent engineers to Europe to study cutting-edge strategies used in German tunneling. He explained that those investments have unfortunately paid off, creating an extensive underground smuggling network that would not be affected by the creation of a wall on the desert soil above.

“If you took a giant knife and you sliced across the 2,000-mile U.S.-Mexico border, it would look like a block of Swiss cheese because it’s riddled with tunnels,” he said.

That doesn’t mean that border security is a Sisyphean task and that we should give up on it. It’s essential for national security and humanitarian justice to ensure that the government can properly patrol the southern border. But the first question lawmakers must ask themselves when disbursing billions of dollars is will this be a cost-effective way to spend this money? With Trump’s wall, the answer is clearly a resounding “no.”

Additional funds for smart border security could help, though. Vigil points to a few possible solutions: drones, ground sensors that are unattended and better camera systems (to name just a few). But with all of them, border security requires more personnel, so agents can actually tackle the problems they detect. The starting base salary for a border agent is $40,511, so $5.7 billion would go a long way. And more money could also be spent on Coast Guard operations. Officials have said their resources are stretched so thin that they can pursue only 20 percent of the leads that are generated by intelligence.

Vigil supports these ideas, but he also thinks the solution needs to focus on the drivers of illegal flows across the border, be it drugs or people, that come from countries such as Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. “I would put some of that money to help these countries combat this scourge that is afflicting their nations. Build up the judiciary, train the security forces, and that would go a long way.”

There are smart and stupid ways to approach border security. Trump’s wall is the stupid way. In negotiations with the White House, House Democrats should make that clear and explain why their plan will secure the border more effectively and at lower cost.
https://www.washingtontimes.com/news...-survey-finds/

I’m sure within a matter of seconds you’ll find a reason to dismiss that border control control folks (you know, the ones who actually stand watch on the border) overwhelmingly believe the wall should be built.
West Coast is online now  
Old 1st Feb 2019, 17:56
  #17357 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
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Originally Posted by Turbine D View Post
Democracy Post contributor

January 31 at 2:48 PMAfter caving on the shutdown, President Trump continues to insist that American taxpayers shell out $5.7 billion for a border wall (or is it a fence?) that he promised would be paid for by Mexico. There are many reasons to oppose Trump’s quixotic demand for a wall, but the most straightforward one is also the simplest: It won’t work. Trump’s wall would be a gargantuan boondoggle, an ineffective and expensive barrier that would likely displace rather than deter illegal crossings and cross-border smuggling. And that $5.7 billion Trump is demanding could be put to much better use to actually secure the border.

In the past, Trump has boasted that he has won political support because people realize that he knows “more about this stuff than anybody" when it comes to border security.

I suspect that Mike Vigil would beg to differ. Vigil served as the former head of international operations at the Drug Enforcement Administration. He spent three years as an undercover agent infiltrating drug cartels in Colombia and 13 years doing the same in Mexico. Vigil posed as a drug trafficker and won the confidence of drug lords. He nearly was killed taking down key players in the Guadalajara Cartel, the criminal network that murdered and tortured fellow DEA agent Kiki Camarena, one of Vigil’s friends. And then he oversaw all international narcotics operations for the largest anti-drug agency on the planet.

In short, he understands the world of traffickers on the southern border because he lived in it for decades. Trump often argues that the wall would stop drug trafficking. So I asked Vigil: Does he think that Trump’s wall would, in any way, limit the flow of drugs into the United States? He didn’t hesitate.

“Why would you want to toss billions of dollars on a useless project that would have absolutely zero impact? Zero impact. … It’s not going to stop anything. They’ll tunnel. They’ll punch holes in it and put French doors with stained glass on that wall. They’ll fly over it” (with cheap drones).

In fact, in areas where barriers already exist — or where drug traffickers worry they’ll be detected by existing surveillance measures — the cartels have developed advanced tunnels. Those tunnels sometimes even include sophisticated rail systems. Some are powered by solar energy. Others have complex ventilation and air-filtration systems. They often originate inside private homes on one side of the border and pop up inside a house on the other side, making policing them difficult.

Vigil told me that some drug kingpins, such as the notorious Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán Loera, who is on trial in New York, even sent engineers to Europe to study cutting-edge strategies used in German tunneling. He explained that those investments have unfortunately paid off, creating an extensive underground smuggling network that would not be affected by the creation of a wall on the desert soil above.

“If you took a giant knife and you sliced across the 2,000-mile U.S.-Mexico border, it would look like a block of Swiss cheese because it’s riddled with tunnels,” he said.

That doesn’t mean that border security is a Sisyphean task and that we should give up on it. It’s essential for national security and humanitarian justice to ensure that the government can properly patrol the southern border. But the first question lawmakers must ask themselves when disbursing billions of dollars is will this be a cost-effective way to spend this money? With Trump’s wall, the answer is clearly a resounding “no.”

Additional funds for smart border security could help, though. Vigil points to a few possible solutions: drones, ground sensors that are unattended and better camera systems (to name just a few). But with all of them, border security requires more personnel, so agents can actually tackle the problems they detect. The starting base salary for a border agent is $40,511, so $5.7 billion would go a long way. And more money could also be spent on Coast Guard operations. Officials have said their resources are stretched so thin that they can pursue only 20 percent of the leads that are generated by intelligence.

Vigil supports these ideas, but he also thinks the solution needs to focus on the drivers of illegal flows across the border, be it drugs or people, that come from countries such as Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. “I would put some of that money to help these countries combat this scourge that is afflicting their nations. Build up the judiciary, train the security forces, and that would go a long way.”

There are smart and stupid ways to approach border security. Trump’s wall is the stupid way. In negotiations with the White House, House Democrats should make that clear and explain why their plan will secure the border more effectively and at lower cost.
https://www.washingtontimes.com/news...-survey-finds/

I’m sure within a matter of seconds you’ll find a reason to dismiss that border patrol folks (you know, the ones who actually stand watch on the border) overwhelmingly belief the wall should be built.
West Coast is online now  
Old 1st Feb 2019, 17:59
  #17358 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Vendee
Posts: 138
Obviously there is no one thing that solves a problem as vast as illegal immigration (or must I use the word "undocumented?"). Yet the more I read intelligent replies to Trump's folly, the more that E-verify seems to be a major first step.

I called a legal beagle friend of mine in Raleigh on this and he said that there has been infomal, but hefty, pushback from all sides. Should you want to get a job as an IT programner or stock jobber then you betcha that you are going through E-verify. But if you are toiling in the fields or meat-processing plant...

Is this accurate? Two, were it widely applied, would it help? It seems that those, of any political stripe, who rely on inexpensive labour are loathe to use this system.

Chuks, was not part of the slide into Vietnam a result of Kennedy saying he had to take a stand after the loss of Cuba and the Berlin incident? Obviously another complex situation, but one can sort of understand the strategic thinking.

I was floored when I had read, some years ago that the U.S. was not actively stopping shipping to the North. You bring a good point to light in the difficulty in stopping arms movement after they had been unloaded and fielded...Tons of munitions dropped all over the country to stop what should have been interdicted at the port or on the seas.
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Old 1st Feb 2019, 19:05
  #17359 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: E.Wash State
Posts: 595
Fred, I can tell you from experience that e-verify is indeed in effect for lower level workers too. Farmers are required to get the prospective worker's papers, and check them through the system. But, it may be a surprise to you to find that many of the field workers, seeing as how they are illegal immigrants, have FAKE papers, which can be bought easily for about $25. The employer has no way to know if these papers are forged or not. To me it looks suspicious when half the group is named Jose Garcia, but if you question that you are a racist these days.

Having said that, I don;t really see what is so hard about passing out an id card to migrant workers as they enter legally, as we cannot harvest our crops in this country without them. Not at a price we cheapskates are willing to pay for a head of lettuce. Who cares if they are all Jose Garcia.
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Old 1st Feb 2019, 21:19
  #17360 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
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My German wife can not understand how I could have volunteered for Vietnam. That makes absolutely no sense to her at all, given that I am intelligent and all.

It really is so that "The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there." We already had college kids protesting about Vietnam, but in the early Sixties they were protesting that we were not getting stuck into those Commies. That changed once the casualty count began to rise.

A joke that was making the rounds then: "The Eisenhower doll: You wind it up and it does nothing for eight years." Of course Eisenhower knew something important from his time as Supreme Commander: When you open up a can of whoop-ass, you need to be very careful not to get any on you.

One day, fairly early in my first tour, I passed a parking lot in Saigon that was crammed full of brand new garbage trucks, all with that USAID sticker on the doors. I had a "satori" then about what we were really up to in Vietnam. Basically we were not there to win but just to bugger about for a while throwing money and lives at this problem, and then to leave.

Things spiraled down into just counting their dead, exaggerating a bit, and when we were killing a lot more of them than they were killing of us, that counted for progress.

Just the other day the wife, again, asked me how many of us died, when I said "About 58 thousand."

"Und wieviel Vietnamesen?" ("How many Vietnamese?")

"No idea. Millions, anyway."

Air power, bitch! High civilian casualties are guaranteed when you fight a war that way.

Try to find a Vietnam War Memorial in Washington, D.C. (Spoiler alert: There isn't one.) That famous black wall is the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, memorializing our veterans, of course, but not the war as such.

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