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3D printing jet engine

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3D printing jet engine

Old 26th Feb 2015, 03:32
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3D printing jet engine

Local new in Oz reporting success in 3D printing a jet engine !!!!

3D printing: Australian researchers create jet engine, breakthrough captures attention of Airbus and Boeing - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)



Didn't think plastic engines had a very long operational life. The last ones I got up close to and personal had titanium blades. Not something easily squeezed out of a bubble jet printer. Reckon it's got to be a con, so posted here in JB.
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Old 26th Feb 2015, 04:24
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GE's been printing GE9X blades for a while. Doesn't Boeing have some Eosint kit?
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Old 26th Feb 2015, 04:24
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Not plastic apparently, but the method where metal is fused with a [email protected] in layers on a printer to make the item.
From the article "Technically known as additive manufacturing, the machine uses a high-powered [email protected] to fuse powdered nickel, titanium or aluminium into the shape of objects."
I know very little about it.
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Old 26th Feb 2015, 04:25
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Not a con, internal jet engine parts are already being manufactured by the process.

How it works

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gu6m7y3cKZc
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Old 26th Feb 2015, 04:26
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No, it is real. A little research before posting may be in order.
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Old 26th Feb 2015, 04:50
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Excellent. Now our 3D-printed drones can have 3D-printed jet engines.

(OK, in twenty years when these things are cheap enough for home use)
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Old 26th Feb 2015, 05:06
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3D printing jet engine

You can 3D print in pretty much any material.
The real questions are about the mechanical properties of the resulting object and the economics of the whole process. But perfectly feasible!
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Old 26th Feb 2015, 05:10
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No, it is real. A little research before posting may be in order.
Lighten up, this is Jet Blast not the Times letters page.
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Old 26th Feb 2015, 06:45
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No, it is real. A little research before posting may be in order.
If folks did that, this website would be mostly redundant.
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Old 26th Feb 2015, 09:14
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I hear a certain Irish airline has started 3D printing pilots.
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Old 26th Feb 2015, 14:42
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That's ridiculous; all the pilots I know are 2-dimensional.

Isn't "3D printing" pretty much the same as "computer-controlled manufacturing", using a process that builds up the material in a certain way to produce the finished object?
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Old 26th Feb 2015, 15:01
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Direct metal [email protected] sintering
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Old 27th Feb 2015, 05:23
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Here is a better picture of the parts:



I presume the sintering process results in objects with the appropriate protection against heat and stress.

A very interesting development considering how expensive it is to machine the parts from castings etc.
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Old 27th Feb 2015, 05:29
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Is that a weld line i see on the exorst section ?
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Old 27th Feb 2015, 05:42
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Could be. They were given a real jet engine and told to reproduce it. Perhaps they printed the weld line as well, to make for a true replica
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Old 27th Feb 2015, 05:59
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I would hazard a guess a few machinists would be getting nervous about the future of their positions within a few short years. Not that todays machinists do any more than select the correct CNC card for the part to be produced.

So .. on this basis, are we likely to see a revisit of "Flight of the Phoenix"? - where some gung-ho survivors of a crashed jet, fire up their [email protected] printer, build a new wing and tail section and a new engine from some bags of powdered metal they just conveniently happened to be carrying? - and we watch them fly successfully back to civilisation??
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Old 27th Feb 2015, 07:13
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Wouldn't have half made a difference when flying in TPNG and Africa if there had a been a 3D printer and computer onboard. Often having to "patch" parts to enable exit from some scruffy strip. Now just dial in the required part, wait a few minutes, fit new part and continue flight.
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Old 27th Feb 2015, 07:56
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The partnership between Monash University and spin-out company Amaero Engineering has captured the attention of Airbus, Boeing and defence contractor Raytheon.
Are the airframe makers trying to bypass the engine makers?

Does this mean that the companies that should really be worried are RR, GE and P&W?
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Old 27th Feb 2015, 08:26
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The technology is equally applicable to airframe parts.

In one example a complex shaped part needed to be constructed from over 100 components and their fasteners. The sintered single piece replacement not only reduced cost and manufacturing time by a couple of factors - but reduced the final weight by 84%..........
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Old 27th Feb 2015, 09:22
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I'm totally unfamiliar with the process, but being based on digital methods does it suffer from pixilation issues?

Does the final product require a little bit of manual smoothing down?
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