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Galileo's pendulum

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Galileo's pendulum

Old 22nd Feb 2015, 08:59
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AAG I too had my own darkroom and became pretty accurate in my counting (helped perhaps by being a drummer too). My college's darkrooms had an electronic beeper sounding every second and days after working in them I could still internally 'hear" a constant "beep... beep....beep" and used to walk in time with it!
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Old 22nd Feb 2015, 09:00
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Talk of the rolling balls in troughs reminded of a jeweller's shop in Richmond, Yorks which back in the 60s had an old Congreve clock in the window. Always stopped to watch it - hypnotising

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gn-um6LOjDg
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Old 22nd Feb 2015, 09:07
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Quote op

What I want to know is how did he notice this in the first place?


I would have thought he would have noticed that swinging lamp kept in time with music. Musicians are used to keeping very strict timing.
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Old 22nd Feb 2015, 09:13
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I would imagine, but don't know, that a musician of that era would have had to try hard not to let his pulse interfere with his timing. As stated above, it is possible to get one's brain in tic mode and be reasonably accurate.

Over many years I have tended to time things using that method with fair success. For instance, we took our tea water from the filtered fridge dispenser. It was tediously slow, as was the 110v kettle, so I aimed to get the amount optimized. It wasn't long before I got it spot on the sight-gauge line every time. However, any stimulus, like the sheriff using my drive to turn in, could alter my perceptions. That Wadd-av-I-done syndrome gets one ready for fight or flight and totally resets our clocks.

I wonder if the same is true for Sir Simon Rattle. I'll wager he'll have a darn nigh-on perfect internal clock.
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Old 22nd Feb 2015, 09:34
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Remember reading and interview with an F1 driver (Jackie Stewart?) years ago. He claimed that he could tell his lap time within a couple of tenths of a second. Of course, that may have been because he knew roughly what his time would be, and knew if he had done a fast or slow lap.

Galileo wasn't the only one who used his pulse as a timer. Leonardo da Vinci did so when investigating water flow.
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Old 22nd Feb 2015, 09:48
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Sir Simon Rattle started his career as a percussionist and can keep excellent time as well as knowing how to "bend" time for maximum musical effect without loosing touch with the original tempo.
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Old 22nd Feb 2015, 09:50
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I would imagine the drip of water from a slightly -leaking container, would give a pretty good time-constant.

They could have proved that with a stop- watch
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Old 22nd Feb 2015, 10:24
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Foucault had a different one !!

Foucault pendulum - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

One at Preston, Lancashire in the Harris museum.

Lid
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Old 22nd Feb 2015, 10:35
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Anybody know offhand when and where the minute was first divided into sixty parts ie the second?
Finding a actual date on google has proved elusive,one might have to start trolling through actual books.
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Old 22nd Feb 2015, 10:42
  #30 (permalink)  
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Why is a minute divided into 60 seconds, an hour into 60 minutes, yet there are only 24 hours in a day? - Scientific American
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Old 22nd Feb 2015, 11:38
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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that documentary,it appeared to be aimed at a audience of ten year olds,
That programme, and the previous one in the series, struck me as being 'Made for US consumption'. His reference to standardised time being introduced in 1865 in the US 'and adopted a year later in the UK' ignored the fact that the GWR started using it in 1840 and it being taken up by other railway companies in the next 2 to three years. The cartoon clips reinforced that image.

GG
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Old 22nd Feb 2015, 11:53
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Worth bearing in mid that musicians of Gallileo's time would not have had Metronomes to practice to! They had to wait until Winkel made the first one:

Dietrich Nikolaus Winkel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Later a better version was designed by Maelzel and this is the pattern used until electronic ones, interesting to read about both men's work:

Johann Nepomuk Maelzel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Groundgripper, in my experience there are sometimes contrived "definitions" or warping of facts or even Time itself to ensure that US precedence can be claimed in their programmes!
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Old 22nd Feb 2015, 12:22
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Anyone remember Foucault's Pendulum which used to hang in the Science Museum London and which proved the rotation of the earth was taking place ? I was aghast when it was taken out and replaced with a lift/elevator, needed because fat parents and fat kids couldn't walk to the existing lift shafts near the back of the main hall.
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Old 22nd Feb 2015, 13:01
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I used to love watching the pendulum there, in front of the Atmospheric engines. After a few hours of looking around the museum I would return to see how it had progressed. Hope to visit their large object store some time.
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Old 22nd Feb 2015, 14:59
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Anyone remember Foucault's Pendulum which used to hang in the Science Museum London and which proved the rotation of the earth was taking place ? I was aghast when it was taken out and replaced with a lift/elevator, needed because fat parents and fat kids couldn't walk to the existing lift shafts near the back of the main hall.

Whaaaaaattt?? You're kidding! Gone?

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Old 22nd Feb 2015, 15:53
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Yup, sadly it went quite a few years ago. The lifts there are quite nice, with transparent panels and fascias so that you can watch all the workings, but I do miss the pendulum and looking up to its top.
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Old 22nd Feb 2015, 21:26
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You mean there's Foucault there?
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Old 22nd Feb 2015, 22:24
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G-CPTN, it takes a lot to make me laugh, but that did!
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Old 22nd Feb 2015, 23:07
  #39 (permalink)  
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Concur.



There's a vast iron chandelier in Biltmore, the largest privately owned home in the US. (beautiful in the extreme) It hangs in a large and very tall area with the stairs to one side in the wall. When they took it down to electrify it, the bolt, in shear, was almost worn through. I wonder if cyclic movement caused it to wear because that might have fooled the designers.

The darn thing weighed 1,700lbs if I remember correctly.
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Old 22nd Feb 2015, 23:38
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I like this at the end of the link from post#32
' Interestingly, in order to keep atomic time in agreement with astronomical time, leap seconds occasionally must be added to UTC. Thus, not all minutes contain 60 seconds. A few rare minutes, occurring at a rate of about eight per decade, actually contain 61....'

Anuvver interesting fact is that atomic clocks in TV satellites in geostationary orbit (but still whizzing rapidly round earth) go out of sync with their 'stationary' brothers on earth due to a relativity effect and have to be tweaked occasionally.
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