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SpaceX Falcon 9 Live Landing Attempt

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SpaceX Falcon 9 Live Landing Attempt

Old 2nd Mar 2019, 01:55
  #121 (permalink)  
 
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Great! I've just prepped my pontoon boat on the central FL Lakes to go out at 02:30 Sat. Skies should be clear, so hoping for a nice reflection in the water.

Fingers crossed for an on-time launch!
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Old 3rd Mar 2019, 10:25
  #122 (permalink)  
 
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Looks like the Dragon vehicle has successfully docked with the ISS.
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Old 3rd Mar 2019, 13:51
  #123 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by VP959 View Post
Looks like the Dragon vehicle has successfully docked with the ISS.
It's been reported that there may have been a leak on the hull.
The crew on the ISS have been trying desperately to resuscitate the newly arrived crew member.
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Old 3rd Mar 2019, 14:28
  #124 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by WingNut60 View Post
It's been reported that there may have been a leak on the hull.
The crew on the ISS have been trying desperately to resuscitate the newly arrived crew member.
Sometimes I really wish there was a like button here.

"Alas, poor Ripley! I knew her, Horatio; a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy; he hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is! My gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your gibes now? Your gambols? Your songs? Your flashes of merriment, that were wont to set the table on a roar?"

(with apologies to WS)

Last edited by VP959; 3rd Mar 2019 at 15:39. Reason: serious error...
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Old 3rd Mar 2019, 15:35
  #125 (permalink)  
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Ripley (she)



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Old 3rd Mar 2019, 15:38
  #126 (permalink)  
 
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Oops...

(padding characters so this would post)
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Old 8th Mar 2019, 19:56
  #127 (permalink)  
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https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-47477617

SpaceX Dragon demo capsule returns to Earth
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Old 12th Apr 2019, 06:13
  #128 (permalink)  
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https://www.space.com/spacex-falcon-...g-success.html

SpaceX Falcon Heavy Sticks Triple Rocket Landing with 1st Commercial Launch




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Old 12th Apr 2019, 06:36
  #129 (permalink)  
 
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They are doing some really good work.
Pinpoint landings are more exciting than the launch.
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Old 12th Apr 2019, 18:10
  #130 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by meadowrun View Post
Pinpoint landings are more exciting than the launch.
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."

I don't care that I know it's technology. It's still magic.
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Old 13th Apr 2019, 03:15
  #131 (permalink)  
 
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Magnificent effort. Question, why no flame issuing from the engine in space on the upper stage? Ionisation of gases when in the atmosphere?
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Old 22nd Apr 2019, 05:56
  #132 (permalink)  
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Whoops....

https://eu.floridatoday.com/story/te...al/3531086002/

Smoke seen for miles as SpaceX Crew Dragon suffers anomaly at Cape Canaveral

A SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule suffered an anomaly during an engine test firing at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on Saturday afternoon, company and 45th Space Wing officials confirmed. "On April 20, 2019, an anomaly occurred at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station during the Dragon 2 static test fire," Wing Spokesman Jim Williams told FLORIDA TODAY. "The anomaly was contained and there were no injuries."

........Unconfirmed reports indicated the capsule was destroyed.

“Earlier today, SpaceX conducted a series of engine tests on a Crew Dragon test vehicle on our test stand at Landing Zone 1 in Cape Canaveral, Florida," SpaceX said in a statement. "The initial tests completed successfully but the final test resulted in an anomaly on the test stand. Ensuring that our systems meet rigorous safety standards and detecting anomalies like this prior to flight are the main reasons why we test. Our teams are investigating and working closely with our NASA partners," the company said.........

It is unknown which Crew Dragon was involved in the Saturday anomaly, but each spacecraft has Super Draco thrusters designed to be used as a launch abort system. All SpaceX engines require occasional test firings to evaluate readiness and performance. SpaceX's timeline to return crews to the ISS from U.S. soil will now likely be modified as the investigation into the incident continues........

https://www.teslarati.com/spacex-crew-dragon-explosion/

SpaceX’s Crew Dragon suffers catastrophic explosion during static fire test

Six weeks after the spacecraft completed its orbital launch debut, SpaceX’s first flight-proven Crew Dragon capsule suffered a catastrophic explosion seconds before a planned SuperDraco test fire.

In the last nine years, SpaceX has successfully built, tested, launched, and recovered Cargo and Crew Dragons 18 times, including five instances of Cargo Dragon capsule reuse, all with minor or no issues. The April 20th event is the first time in the known history of SpaceX’s orbital spacecraft program that a vehicle – in this case, the first completed and flight-proven Crew Dragon capsule – has suffered a total failure. Regardless of the accident investigation’s ultimate conclusions, the road ahead of Crew Dragon’s first crewed test flight has become far more arduous........

According to information acquired by NASASpaceflight.com, SpaceX was in the middle of a series of static fire tests meant to verify that the flight-proven capsule was in good working order after Crew Dragon’s inaugural mission to orbit. The spacecraft was to be tested near SpaceX’s Cape Canaveral Landing Zone facilities, where the company has a small but dedicated space for Dragon tests. Crew Dragon C201’s testing began earlier on Saturday, successfully firing up its smaller Draco maneuvering thrusters. This transitioned into a planned SuperDraco ignition, what would have been the first such integrated test fire for capsule C201.

SpaceX planned to rapidly reuse Crew Dragon C201 for an upcoming in-flight abort (IFA) test, in which the spacecraft would be required to successfully escape from Falcon 9 at the point of peak aerodynamic stress (Max Q). Based on a leaked video of the failure, one or several faults in Crew Dragon’s design and/or build led to a near-instantaneous explosion that completed destroyed the spacecraft. Sound in the background seems to indicate that the explosion occurred several seconds before the planned SuperDraco ignition, a major concern given their pressure-fed design.......

As pressure-fed rocket engines specifically designed to be the basis of a launch escape system, Crew Dragon and its SuperDraco thrusters are meant to be ready to ignite at a millisecond’s notice once they are armed in a flight-ready configuration. It’s safe to say that ten seconds away from a specifically planned ignition is one of those moments, although there is a limited chance that SpaceX’s static fire procedures intentionally diverge from an abort-triggered ignition. Regardless, the fact that Crew Dragon was destroyed before the ignition of its SuperDracos is not an encouraging sign.

Instead of a problem with its high-performance abort thrusters, it can be tentatively concluded that Crew Dragon’s explosion originated in its fuel tanks or propellant plumbing. Such an immediate and energetic explosion points more towards a total failure of propellant lines or valves (or their avionics), while another – and potentially far more concerning – cause could be one of Crew Dragon’s pressure vessels. In a space as enclosed as a Dragon capsule, the rupture of a pressure vessel could trigger a chain reaction of pressure vessel failures, freeing both oxidizer (NTO) and fuel (MMH). Known as hypergolic propellant, NTO and MMH ignite immediately (and violently so) when mixed.

It’s quite possible that the accident investigation to follow will be SpaceX’s most difficult and trying yet. Regardless of the specific cause, the footage of Crew Dragon C201’s demise does not support any positive conclusions about the fate of astronauts or passengers, had they been aboard during the violent explosion. Seemingly triggered in some way by the very system meant to safely extricate Crew Dragon and its astronauts from a failing Falcon 9 rocket, major work will need to be done to prove to NASA that the spacecraft is safe. Sadly, Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft – funded in parallel with Crew Dragon under NASA’s Commercial Crew Program – suffered a far less severe but no less significant failure during a static fire test of its own abort thrusters. Boeing was forced to remove the impacted hardware from its flight plans to extensively clean, repair, and rework the service module.

NASA is now faced with the fact that both of the spacecraft it supported with CCP have exhibited major failures related to their launch escape systems. Crew Dragon’s catastrophic explosion comes as a particularly extreme surprise given how extensively SpaceX has already tested the SuperDraco engines and plumbing, as well as the successful completion of the spacecraft’s launch debut. In the process of DM-1 launch preparations, Crew Dragon likely spent a minimum of 80 minutes with its SuperDraco thrusters and propellant systems primed and ready to abort at any second, apparently without a single mildly-concerning issue.

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Old 5th May 2019, 05:03
  #133 (permalink)  
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SpaceX launches supplies to space station after power delays


SpaceX launched a load of supplies to the International Space Station on Saturday following a pair of power delays.

A Falcon rocket raced into the pre-dawn darkness, carrying a Dragon capsule with 5,500 pounds (2,500 kilograms) of goods. This recycled Dragon—which is making its second space trip—is due to arrive at the orbiting lab Monday. The delivery is a few days late because of electrical power shortages that cropped up first at the space station, then at SpaceX's rocket-landing platform in the Atlantic. Both problems were quickly resolved with equipment replacements: a power-switching unit in orbit and a generator at sea.

Minutes after liftoff, SpaceX landed its brand new, first-stage booster on the ocean platform a mere 14 miles (22.53 kilometers) offshore, considerably closer than usual with the sonic booms easily heard at the launch site. The booster should have returned to Cape Canaveral, but SpaceX is still cleaning up from the April 20 accident that destroyed an empty crew Dragon capsule.......
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Old 25th May 2019, 06:43
  #134 (permalink)  
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Successful launch and deployment of first 60 Starlink comsats - and the third successful launch/landing of the same Falcon booster which is lifted for between 50-100 launches......

https://www.space.com/elon-musk-says...oing-well.html

Elon Musk Says It's 'So Far, So Good' for SpaceX's 1st 60 Starlink Satellites

SpaceX's internet-satellite megaconstellation appears to be off to a good start in low-Earth orbit.

The first 60 members of the company's Starlink network launched last night (May 23) atop a Falcon 9 rocket. The satellites deployed smoothly about an hour after liftoff, and they came online shortly thereafter, SpaceX founder and CEO Elon Musk announced via Twitter last night.

Musk gave us another update this afternoon (May 24), tweeting "
" in response to a follower's question about Starlink's status.

"Krypton thrusters operative, satellites initiating orbit raise every 90 mins," he added in another tweet a bit later. (The satellites deployed at an altitude of 273 miles, or 440 kilometers, and are making their own way to their operational altitude of 342 miles, or 550 km).

Related: SpaceX's 1st Starlink Satellite Megaconstellation Launch in Photos!


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Old 26th Jun 2019, 19:21
  #135 (permalink)  
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Pardon the expletives, but this is f****ing AWESOME. Night launch and recovery. The booster separation and start of burn back is just about 3 mins in and the landing burn at about 7:30 in.


https://www.teslarati.com/spacex-ceo...issed-landing/

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk explains why Falcon Heavy’s center core missed the drone ship

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/0..._falcon_heavy/

SpaceX's Falcon Heavy turned night into day this morning as the monster rocket successfully hauled itself from Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39A. The 27 Merlin engines illuminated the night sky in a manner to bring a nostalgic tear to the eye of those that remember the only Saturn V night launch: Apollo 17 in 1972 from the same pad.

With the weather cooperating and after dealing with a ground hydraulic issue which cropped up early in the count, SpaceX went ahead with loading the rocket with liquid oxygen, effectively committing the company to a launch or scrubbing for the day.

Launch occurred at 0630 UTC on 25 June and the side boosters of the heavy lifter were shut down and separated from the centre core approximately 2 minutes 30 seconds later. The boosters, previously used for the last Falcon Heavy launch, headed back to briefly light up Landing Zones 1 and 2 with a synchronised touchdown. The remaining Falcon 9 first stage continued its burn for another minute before it too was shut down and separated from the second stage of the Falcon Heavy.

Unlike the side boosters, the centre core was faced with what the SpaceX PAO breathlessly described as "the most difficult landing we've had to date" with the spent booster coming in fast towards the drone ship Of Course I Still Love You, which was stationed twice as far into the North Atlantic Ocean (from Port Canaveral) than usual. Not that anything involving landing the first stage of an orbital booster on its end atop a platform at sea should ever be described as something so mundane as "usual".

SpaceX has yet to successfully recover a Falcon Heavy centre stage. The maiden launch of the rocket saw the stage undergo a rapid disassembly after its engines failed to reignite to slow the thing down. The second did land, but subsequently toppled over. Third time was, alas, not the charm. While the engines (the centre and two extra) ignited as planned, cameras on the drone ship captured the returning first stage appearing to miss the barge before creating its own night-into-day moment with a spectacular explosion.

Landing excitement aside, the second stage continued firing and the fairing was deployed just after the four minute mark, exposing the ride-share payload. And the fairing? Much whooping could be heard as SpaceX finally managed to catch one half in the net strung atop Ms Tree (pic here), the ship formerly known as Mr Steven. This was the first time the company has accomplished the feat. The other half will be recovered from the water.

The company boasted that this launch included payloads from the largest number of government agencies it had served thus far on a single Falcon with 24 satellites from the likes of the Department of Defense, the US Air Force and NASA to be deployed over more than three hours (and another three restarts of that second stage engine.)

While SpaceX will be chuffed to demonstrate that its Falcon Heavy can be trusted for government payloads, the science carried on the monster rocket is hugely interesting and includes the crowdfunded LightSail 2........



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Old 27th Jun 2019, 17:39
  #136 (permalink)  
 
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ORAC,

Expletives excused, understood and thoroughly endorsed!

That was imply stunning and awe inspiring, "two 10 storey buildings falling from space..." There is something ethereal about those simultaneous landings, and the commentator/reporter was great, lovely to hear such genuine enthusiasm, appreciation and excitement.

I missed this at the time on TV, thank you SO much for taking the time and trouble to post.
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Old 14th Jul 2019, 06:48
  #137 (permalink)  
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Starhopper due for untethered test on Tuesday.

I like the geeky rough rough and ready look. If it works, it works, don’t worry about appearances....

”The prototype initially had a nosecone, but powerful Texas winds blew it off and damaged it. That's why the vehicle looks stubby and unfinished today.“

https://www.businessinsider.com/spacex-starhopper-hop-test-boca-chica-texas-launch-site-2019-6?r=US&IR=T




“Pa, the neighbours are being noisy again!!”





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Old 14th Jul 2019, 20:18
  #138 (permalink)  
 
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This one is also quite impressive, footage from the caught fairing:
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