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Rough day with the doc

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Rough day with the doc

Old 9th Jun 2010, 10:18
  #41 (permalink)  
 
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Doctor I play squash with says that there is a theory gaining currency in the medico world that says one of the more effective ways to clean out the pipes is to indulge in any form of exercise that raises the pulse above 100/120 bpm for a sustained period, so football, squash, badminton, running, essentually full on aerobic exercise.

Dunno if any studies back that up, buit seems common sense to me.
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Old 9th Jun 2010, 10:48
  #42 (permalink)  
 
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Yeah, but again Sprog....

....at very nearly 69 I don't see me taken up any of those "full on aerobic" pastimes.

You would have thought that as they have the technology to put stents in and do angiograms, why can't they fit the probes with a little wire brush or a reamer, powered by a Dremel, to fetch the clag off the artery walls and hoover out the dislodged bitties?? Maybe I should patent the idea?

The Ancient Mariner
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Old 9th Jun 2010, 10:53
  #43 (permalink)  
 
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Obviously only for that section of society capable & inclined.
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Old 9th Jun 2010, 10:58
  #44 (permalink)  
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You would have thought that as they have the technology to put stents in and do angiograms, why can't they fit the probes with a little wire brush or a reamer, powered by a Dremel, to fetch the clag off the artery walls and hoover out the dislodged bitties?? Maybe I should patent the idea?
I think that may be a patent for strokes & thromboses. From what I understand, it's not a good idea to have bits of clag running free round the bloodstream.

We do have an ex England squash player among our lot, who still whips guys more than half his age in the tournaments - he's 66.
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Old 9th Jun 2010, 11:40
  #45 (permalink)  
 
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Ah but ah but ah but Para...

....that's why I added in the bit about "hoovering out the bitties".

Recently lost a friend who had a blockage at the "Y" junction of his cranial artery in the back of his neck. It was deemed too difficult/dangerous to operate and he shortly thereafter died. It was this fear of a "loose" bit getting away and causing a stroke that prevented surgery. I had this feeling that perhaps a "bypass type arrangement" would have allowed work to be done on the blockage with little risk of "bitties" getting away. After all they seem to do it fairly routinely to allow work on a "stopped" heart.

Unfortunately all the cardiac surgery slots were taken when I did my resettlement course in '98, so I had to the works and bricks course instead.

The Ancient Mariner
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Old 9th Jun 2010, 11:49
  #46 (permalink)  

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my legs looked as though I was suffering from Elephantiasis so I stopped taking them, they're still swollen after 2 months.
could be diabetes related, try weaaring flight (support) stockings or better still, check with the doc.
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Old 9th Jun 2010, 12:16
  #47 (permalink)  
 
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If only not eating cholesterol would lower it, but it doesn't, at least not by much. The problem is that body makes it - as noted it's a vital part of us - and it's not only the overall level that matters, but the balance between the LDL (bad) and HDL (good) versions.

Not only does the body make cholesterol, but the overall amount and balance is very much genetically determined. The OP got the bad gene, I got the good one.

@Rossian, I'm sure hill-walking is suitably aerobic. It certainly felt that way last Friday! However I don't think it lowers blood cholesterol, though it makes sense that it helps prevent a build-up in those of us with excessive levels.
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Old 9th Jun 2010, 12:44
  #48 (permalink)  
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Doctor I play squash with says that there is a theory gaining currency in the medico world that says one of the more effective ways to clean out the pipes is to indulge in any form of exercise that raises the pulse above 100/120 bpm for a sustained period, so football, squash, badminton, running, essentially full on aerobic exercise.
Don't think the idea of aerobic exercise as a means to reduce cholesterol is all that recent. Was told nearly twenty years ago that, in the ideal world, the human should try and do at least twelve minutes every day of aerobic exercise with the heart rate at or above a pre determined level, established by a rule of thumb of 220 minus your age.

Ideal aerobic exercises are swimming, cross country skiing, cycling etc. that involve a continuous and regular rhythm, rather than squash, tennis etc. that can be stop-start. I was told it was the sustained heart rate, at a regular beat, that did the trick. Anything over about twelve minutes is good for knocking off the calories.

Running is aerobic but less healthy over time, as it can lead to ankle, knee, hip and back problems in later life.

Bottom line is that all exercise is healthy and any exercise is better than none, it's just the effort of making the effort that I find a problem!
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Old 9th Jun 2010, 12:54
  #49 (permalink)  
 
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To clarify, he was saying exercise not as a means of lowering cholesterol, although it's recognised that it does, but more as a means of reducing the deposits already in the pipework - akin to flushing the system as it were.
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Old 9th Jun 2010, 13:01
  #50 (permalink)  
 
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Interesting post arcniz, nice to here from someone as cynical as myself.

Interesting how the drugs companies haven't developed many new antibiotics over the years ('annt much money in things used over a 5 days course).

However, even as cynical as I am, these statins do seem to work. Those in the know, suspect that there is some unknown "magic" effect, of a statin, which may not be related to the cholesterol at all.

In answer to this
.....do statins actually reduce the amounts of already deposited cholesterol?
Some claim to-the drug companies make a big song and dance about reductions in lumen thickness or some such thing-and boy oh boy, don't we know it. And doctors (and some nurses, and all pharmacists), are a little like pilots, erring to the side of nurdishness, so they lap it up.

But the bottom line, (the ultimate outcome measure if you like), is, will it make me live longer and better.


(Or are we just replacing the cause of death on the certificate?)
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Old 9th Jun 2010, 13:44
  #51 (permalink)  
 
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I reached mid 50's and as in the rest of my family at that age, had to be put on Simvastatin. Within days I was hit by nearly every evil side effect of the drug and couldn't do anything that required effort, like earning a living. Kept going for about 6 weeks but couldn't get beyond the side effects. I stopped taking them and within 48 hours I felt healthy again.

Apparently the alternative drug options (the ones which shouldn't give me side effects) are too expensive.

I just try and live a healthy lifestyle plus exercise and hope I live as long as my parents. Both nearly 90 when they shuffled off and both had a history of high cholesterol.
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Old 9th Jun 2010, 14:09
  #52 (permalink)  
 
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I've been dodging my Doc for a while but am about to fall into his clutches soon as he deliberately gave me a short prescription last time. He is keen on healthy diet, low cholestrol etc and it has been elevated in recent tests. Plus of late my diet has been all over the place due to work. I've just done an insane week of flying.

I have high blood pressure and am on two types of medication. I would suggest it's foolish to simply give up one or other like Mr Draper did. I couldn't anyway as they would pull my class 1 medical. There are a lot of blood pressure drugs out there. If one causes a side effect then try another. When on occasion I run out of tablets, largely because it coincides with running out of money. (No proper National Health here.) There is rapid increase in blood pressure followed by a general sense of unwellness followed by an increase in headaches. Clearly I need them. The stroke option is scary.

I can see myself ending up on Simvastatin at some point. (Another dammed expense), Glad to hear it has a good side.
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Old 9th Jun 2010, 14:46
  #53 (permalink)  
 
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Any new antibiotics won't be pence per course like the ones we've had for ages - those are cheap as they are out of patent and can be made anywhere.

It's true new ones aren't coming along as fast as they used to, but there have been several this millenium. Fortunately most of us are never ill enough to need anything new / exotic.
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Old 9th Jun 2010, 15:02
  #54 (permalink)  
 
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Other posters have referred to the availability of alternative tablets for both cholesterol and hypertension, the "best" selection being dependent on a number of factors. Tolerance of possible uncomfortable side effects is clearly important, dosage another, and close liaison between you and your GP, on a completely frank basis (no "being brave" and holding back, it's pointless!) is the best approach to arrive at your optimum prescription.

But this sensible trial-and-error process is badly derailed by that "elephant in the room", the cost of the tablets. Atorvastatin (Lipitor) is two to three times the cost of generic (non-trademarked) Simvastatin for example. In a fair world this would not matter, if Lipitor suits your particular condition best, it ought to be prescribed. But it appears that "postcode prescribing" enters into the equation, which is so obviously wrong when we all pay for an even-handed NHS through our taxation and National Insurance.
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Old 9th Jun 2010, 15:56
  #55 (permalink)  
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Sunnybunny

Mrs 1DC is type 2 diabetic and was on simvastatin 40, she had to stop taking it because it damaged her liver function.
I have been on simvastatin 20 for about 30 years and apart from the occasional muscle problems and regular night cramps no other problems, however i went away for three months and stopped taking a cod liver oil pill and a vitamin e pill which i had also taken for years and the cramps stopped. I am now home and haven't resumed the pills and still no cramp..
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Old 9th Jun 2010, 16:50
  #56 (permalink)  
 
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So much of interest here.

FWIW 54yrs old - Crestor (rosuvastatin) 10mg / day and Atacand Plus 16/12.5mg / day seems to work for me. Initially Atacand on its own worked and then the BP started to rise again, so adding the diuretic portion to the mix seems to work. Full kidney and liver function testings on a regular basis suggests that all is ok there so ok it is costing me a lot each month but the alternative is not nice to consider.

My Doctor is brilliant, she listens to what I am saying, seems to recognise the difference between enjoying life and spending every day watching what is eaten etc. Ok she does raise her eyes a bit at inhaling higher than recommended quantities of alcohol but never lectures. She gets my vote.

My Mother (85 years old) has had BP and Cholesterol problems for years and even now she watches what she eats and with absolutely minimal fat intake she still needs medication. It seems that some people have liver function that just pumps the stuff out at levels triggering medical intervention.

Last edited by driftdown; 9th Jun 2010 at 16:51. Reason: forgot the decimal point in the atacand bit !
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Old 9th Jun 2010, 19:02
  #57 (permalink)  
 
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driftdown:

Not surprising that your doc raises her eyebrows, if you have been inhaling it! Most of us just ingest it by drinking it down ...

OK, we know what you mean!
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Old 10th Jun 2010, 13:53
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Has anyone mentioned a certain side effect of simvastatin? erectile dysfunction. Now how do i know this??? becuase my sisters husband takes it and things are droppy in the "you know what" department.
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Old 10th Jun 2010, 15:46
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I have been taking Simvastatin for 9 years and have had no side effects. My cholestesterol has stayed at 2.3 for a number of years.
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Old 11th Jun 2010, 07:05
  #60 (permalink)  
 
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And how did you know about that part of the problem fr your sister's husband, Atishoo?
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