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MD11 lands safely, has possible ash symptoms

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MD11 lands safely, has possible ash symptoms

Old 21st Apr 2010, 16:07
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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It should be noted that the World Airways MD-11 came from further afield, unloaded freight at Maastricht and then positioned at relatively low level (probably somewhere between FL160 and FL220) to Ostend (about 25 mins flying).
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Old 21st Apr 2010, 16:17
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More than 8000 views and still no confirmation.
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Old 21st Apr 2010, 16:22
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Ok i will clear all the confusion up,it was an MD11 frieghter from Maastricht to Ostende at FL150,when we landed we found evidence of something whether it was ash or just plain old dust we shall know when the engines(3of) are boroscoped which is happening as i type.No drama,some people know how to make a mountain out of a mole hill.But as engineers we had to err on the side of safety and follow the maintenance manual to the letter as always.I think World have done the right thing and followed the procedures,now if the boroscope does find something then alot of airlines are going to be looking for a new engine(s).
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Old 21st Apr 2010, 16:59
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I've renamed this thread to reflect the one glimmer of fact around which the headline-grabbing rampant speculation was circling.

The press reads this forum, and rightly or wrongly treats a lot of the information as fact. Please make sure of what you are writing, at least get some solid facts before committing the act of posting.

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Old 21st Apr 2010, 17:07
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6

Do we actually know that the MD-11 had an IFSD? It sounds more like some ash was discovered during a routine inspection (it was a positioning flight, not a diversion).

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Old 21st Apr 2010, 17:14
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Correct ,apart from the fact we dont know what the residue is,as already stated still awaiting boroscope inspection report.
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Old 21st Apr 2010, 17:21
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Cool, always open to constructive feedback! Changed title again, as I read it there had been an IFSD, so thanks for the information.

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Old 21st Apr 2010, 17:23
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What is a IFSD ?

In Flight Shut Down, referring to an engine.

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Old 21st Apr 2010, 17:28
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IFSD

If you need to ask, you don't need to know
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Old 21st Apr 2010, 17:28
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Thanks Squid...so simple but always looking for a mysterious meaning...
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Old 21st Apr 2010, 17:29
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confirmed it was a scheduled flight just a day or two late.
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Old 21st Apr 2010, 18:30
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Kengineer has gone awfully quiet. If I was you, I would give my source a good slap.
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Old 21st Apr 2010, 18:49
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Kengineer (no prizes for guessing he's a Herc engineer then) obviously has the same duff sources as 'cockanelli' (the clue is in the name) on the Mil Forum. Yes, this is a rumour network but blase statements like this help no-one at the moment, not least our passengers.

As you say, he appears to have gone very quiet.
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Old 21st Apr 2010, 20:10
  #34 (permalink)  
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Sorry! Only going on what we get told, from a much higher level. Hence the initial post asking if anyone could confirm or deny. We then got told as I posted a 747 had landed with 2x engine damage with IFSD. The departing c17 was also held due to this, but thankfully it does not seem to be the case!
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Old 21st Apr 2010, 21:10
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Scoping will of course show affected parts, but just how good is it in determining the possible disruption of cooling airflow?
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Old 22nd Apr 2010, 17:45
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I doubt you'll be able to spot ash in the cooling channels of the turbine blades. usually damage(fod) is found during disassembly for overhaul.

What is (relatively) easy to spot is glassed over injectors.

How much damage or glasing over you find depends on the type of engine, some run a lot hotter then others.
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Old 23rd Apr 2010, 04:38
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The results of a brief seven minute encounter with a diffuse ash cloud.

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/dryden/p...ain_H-2511.pdf

In the early morning hours of February 28, 2000, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) DC-8 Airborne Sciences research airplane inadvertently flew through a diffuse plume of volcanic ash from the Mt. Hekla volcano. There were no indications to the flight crew, but sensitive onboard instruments detected the 35-hr-old ash plume. Upon landing there was no visible damage to the airplane or engine first-stage fan blades; later borescope inspection of the engines revealed clogged turbine cooling air passages. The engines were removed and overhauled at a cost of $3.2 million. Satellite data analysis of the volcanic ash plume trajectory indicated the ash plume had been transported further north than predicted by atmospheric effects. Analysis of the ash particles collected in cabin air heat exchanger filters showed strong evidence of volcanic ash, most of which may have been ice-coated (and therefore less damaging to the airplane) at the time of the encounter. Engine operating temperatures at the time of the encounter were sufficiently high to cause melting and fusing of ash on and inside high-pressure turbine blade cooling passages. There was no evidence of engine damage in the engine trending results, but some of the turbine blades had been operating partially uncooled and may have had a remaining lifetime of as little as 100 hr. There are currently no fully reliable methods available to flight crews to detect the presence of a diffuse, yet potentially damaging volcanic ash cloud.
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Old 23rd Apr 2010, 16:41
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Ok final word none of the engines showed any volcanic ash damage.
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Old 24th Apr 2010, 09:58
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So could this thread now be renamed "MD11 lands safely, has no ash symptoms"??
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Old 24th Apr 2010, 20:33
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So could this thread now be renamed "MD11 lands safely, has no ash symptoms"??
How about "Nothing to see here folks, move along"
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