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Early navigation. Antikythera Mechanism.

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Early navigation. Antikythera Mechanism.

Old 18th Mar 2010, 18:49
  #61 (permalink)  
 
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just look at the Romans (which is an interest of mine).
Mine also.

However, I would argue that they did little original in the scientific sense. The Roman 'genius' was to have a system that was able to put capable men at the pinnacle. They would then organise.

disappeared with the end of the Roman Empire, and that had to be re-invented laboriously in and after the Middle Ages.
Arguable at best.

Much of the scientific knowledge, at least, was taken and expanded on by the rapidly expanding Arab Empire. Many Europeans studies in schools in Al Andalus and took their knowledge back to their home countries.
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Old 18th Mar 2010, 18:55
  #62 (permalink)  
 
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Thought the Romans employed Greeks to do the thinking for them?
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Old 18th Mar 2010, 19:07
  #63 (permalink)  
 
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Thought the Romans employed Greeks to do the thinking for them?
Tony Draperios. kebab tonight?
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Old 18th Mar 2010, 20:36
  #64 (permalink)  
 
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Anyway didn't some early Indian cvilizations have underfloor heating working sewage system and running water?,prolly brung back to the Medi by Alexander's chaps.
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Old 18th Mar 2010, 20:59
  #65 (permalink)  
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.. and of course some ancient Scottish civilizations, as per Skara Brae in Orkney, some 5,000 years old:

The dwellings contain a number of stone-built pieces of furniture, including cupboards, dressers, seats, and storage boxes. Each dwelling was entered through a low doorway that had a stone slab door that could be closed "by a bar that slid in bar-holes cut in the stone door jambs".[8] A sophisticated drainage system was even incorporated into the village's design, one that included a primitive form of toilet in each dwelling. Seven of the houses have similar furniture, with the beds and dresser in the same places in each house.
See Google.
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Old 18th Mar 2010, 21:09
  #66 (permalink)  
 
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Tony,
Alexander's chaps arrived over a thousand years after the Indus Valley Civilisation collapsed....
Minoan Crete had some halfway drainage, too.

CJ
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Old 18th Mar 2010, 21:36
  #67 (permalink)  
 
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Then of course we have the Geordie Pyramids built by the ancients out of coal,all gone.
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Old 21st Mar 2010, 00:23
  #68 (permalink)  
 
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Ooh, ahr.



We do keep ours, see.
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Old 21st Mar 2010, 08:07
  #69 (permalink)  
 
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Ah! a proper pit heap,not seen one for ages,thing is pit heaps were a lot higher than they looked from ground level,remember as a urchin self and my gang clambering to the top of one, where we lay gasping like the Bronte Sisters in the coal dust at the apex,I blame that on woodbines behind the bike shed.

Last edited by tony draper; 21st Mar 2010 at 09:36.
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Old 21st Mar 2010, 11:41
  #70 (permalink)  
 
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That's a hell of a ski-slope!!!

I thought those heaps had to be reduced in "Angle" after
the Aberfan disaster?
That one looks to be on the verge of getting "mobile."
My Mum, bless her, still insists on telling me stories about
family outings to go "Coal-picking" on the slag heaps when
she was about 8 or 9.
Then tells me what a great time it was.(?).
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Old 21st Mar 2010, 12:57
  #71 (permalink)  
 
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Ah, the Batch at Midsomer Norton. It has been reduced in height from what it was, used to have a pointy top.

GBZ, that could be the view from the front window of my daughters new house.
You don't live near Northmead Road/Underhill Lane, do you?
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Old 14th Apr 2010, 07:10
  #72 (permalink)  
 
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Sorry for the delay but I've been away, funnily enough, to see the Giza Pyramids.

Alas, it's not my photograph but one linked to a local Radstock/MSN publicity brochure. - It's all you need to know about Norton Radstock in Somerset Perhaps I should have credited that. By way of making some amends, maybe I could say that people come to the area from all over the world to see how people lived before the War. We also have a very good museum.

As you mention it, Im a bit more towards Chilcompton than Northmead.
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Old 12th Mar 2021, 10:28
  #73 (permalink)  
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https://scitechdaily.com/2000-year-o...irst-computer/

2,000-Year-Old Greek Astronomical Calculator: Experts Recreate a Mechanical Cosmos for the World’s First Computer

Researchers at UCL have solved a major piece of the puzzle that makes up the ancient Greek astronomical calculator known as the Antikythera Mechanism, a hand-powered mechanical device that was used to predict astronomical events.

Known to many as the world’s first analog computer, the Antikythera Mechanism is the most complex piece of engineering to have survived from the ancient world. The 2,000-year-old device was used to predict the positions of the Sun, Moon and the planets as well as lunar and solar eclipses.

Published in Scientific Reports, the paper from the multidisciplinary UCL Antikythera Research Team reveals a new display of the ancient Greek order of the Universe (Cosmos), within a complex gearing system at the front of the Mechanism.......




Model of the Antikythera Mechanism, showing the front and back dials as well as an exploded diagram of the gearing.

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Old 12th Mar 2021, 10:54
  #74 (permalink)  
 
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I've been watching this YouTube channel for a long time now. The chap is recreating the antikythera mechanism in incredible detail: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwo...Sx6R6-BnIjS2MA

The first episode :


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Old 12th Mar 2021, 17:51
  #75 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by VP959 View Post
I've been watching this YouTube channel for a long time now. The chap is recreating the antikythera mechanism in incredible detail: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwo...Sx6R6-BnIjS2MA

The first episode : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ML4tw_UzqZE
I've watched all of Clickspring's videos, a real craftsman.
Watch the series about making a clock...

He got so far with his antikythera replica then stopped a while back.
I believe he's been waiting for the publication of this paper to continue the design.
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Old 13th Mar 2021, 03:35
  #76 (permalink)  
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I can't believe it's eleven years since I started this thread. It was in #6 that I explained just how the Klystroniscopermizer came to be on the planet. 05:00, so not much has changed.

"Not only are they lost, but they've left an artefact behind." Just one of my bits of nonsense, but underneath I'm questioning the truth.

I've been reading about the poor logic in assuming that dating of our ancestors put our origins in South Africa. A 300,000 year old skull at the north of the continent seems to have shaken the scientific establishment. I've also had one of my mail links direct me to the news of the death of Dr Sir John Polkinghorne. That's another book or two I need to get a bit sharpish. I'm running out of time if I'm to make sense of the reality I'm in. I'm inclined towards the First Sea Lord's views in the early threads.

It doesn't make sense. Highly developed Homo Sapiens much earlier than we thought, and bewildering skills that seem to be making an instrument based on knowledge far exceeding the necessary manufacturing intellect.

All these years later and I find myself fighting the sleeping tablet I took before finding something really interesting. But about brains, and about memory, and just how much is in our skulls. Reading about Sir John and then the link to skulls took me to the Piltdown forgery. That was a far more interesting read than I thought it would be. Charles Dawson and Arthur Conan Doyle, hmm, nice, but all the time a memory of the thin blue book was nagging at my brain. That was where I first heard of the forgery. What publication was it? Hours later, and nearly asleep, it came to me. My mother was a local farmer's secretary and the little blue book was on the mantle in her office. I read it there, age about 12, and put it back on the mantle. These kind of recalls are an everyday occurrence at the moment. I'm wondering just how much is stored in there. I'm also wondering if it is all pre-backed up elsewhere. I expect Sir John would have a strong argument in favour.
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Old 16th Mar 2021, 03:10
  #77 (permalink)  
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Utterly fabulous lecture. Clear voice and very professional. A man that has been researching this device for a good chunk of his life. It's probably the best lecture of its kind I've ever seen.

If you think you've got a fair idea about the Antikythera mechanism, invest a couple of hours in this. If you start watching, you'll probably see it through. The exploded computer generated model at the end is the first time I've realised just how vast the processes are. It even takes into account the 9 year sidereal swings of the moon. Not knowing, or not being allowed to know, that it's not a heliocentric universe, the method they use to still allow the moon's swings it beyond astonishing.

One vital piece was found in a box in Athens. Apart from the fact it was showing blue-green, there seemed to be nothing in it - until the more up to date tomography started showing dial rings.

1,500 - 2,000 inscriptions. There's still a chance Aristotle was in on its creation, but there isn't anything to compare, anywhere, until the Babbage engine and replicas.

205 BC. The dating took a long time and exquisite detective work.

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Old 16th Mar 2021, 07:21
  #78 (permalink)  
 
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Rob,

Thank you for posting such a fantastic find. I've read quite a bit about the Antikythera mechanism and I've watched Clickspring's videos, but this was amazing. I had already downloaded the Nature paper but hadn't looked at it yet. It's on my immediate to-do list.
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-021-84310-w

If you start watching, you'll probably see it through.
You were correct.
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Old 16th Mar 2021, 10:26
  #79 (permalink)  
 
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Loose : 11 years ! Cripes, only just saw this but I am locked down & really bored now. Keep the stuff coming ! It did make me wonder how I got a 1-11 from Manch to TFS. Over the noggin, lost Lisbon or Faro on back track at one point and too far away from TFN to pick up the front bearing. Omega in the 737 made the same challenge a walk in the park. I tried explaining Omega to my First Mate on a modern, high tech, singing/dancing piece of kit & he just, would not, stop giggling.
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Old 16th Mar 2021, 16:41
  #80 (permalink)  
 
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Loose rivets,
Thank you so much for posting that - a brilliant lecture about a brilliant mechanism. I remember seeing the fragmentary remnants of the original mechanism about fifteen years ago in the Athens museum and being fascinated by it. This lecture explains so much more than was known then about how it worked, what it does and the way in which its mysteries have been unravelled.
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