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Are British Drivers thick?

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Are British Drivers thick?

Old 16th Jan 2010, 16:22
  #61 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
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Are British Drivers thick?
Dunno really.

However, I have spent the last 15 years living/working in the Middle East/Italy or the Philippines.

I am in the UK for about 2 weeks every year. I rent a car from a decent small, family business for the time I am there.

After my experiences abroad, all I can say is that it is a great pleasure to return and drive in the UK. Such politeness, respect for the rules of the road and common courtesy is not the everyday stuff I see where I normally drive.

The only place I see more courteous driving is when I am in Houston. Mates (Yanks) tell me that is because 50% of drivers there have a handgun in the glovebox and will not hesitate to use it if you carve them up.
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Old 17th Jan 2010, 05:33
  #62 (permalink)  
 
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Whirls,

I agree completely it's not always the best tactic, and wouldn't want to give the impression it's something I get up to on a regular basis. Many times I find it's best, as you say, to just come off the speed, and pushed far enough, old Scania/Volvo/DAF etc will roar on past you, only to be held up by the string of vehicles you were keeping a safe distance from anyway!

This is why I made the point, I find it works well on a clear road, not much traffic, with good driving conditions. I've also found that the times I've refined bad habits best is when I've had a scare or a small adrenaline rush myself, but we're not even doing that. Without wanting to take the law into my own hands, I just feel a quick 'moment' can make people think twice about their actions.

It does amaze (as opposed to surprise) me still when I find 44 tonnes up my backside - the fact of the matter is, whatever road I'm on, if some kid runs out in front of my car, or some numpty on the other side decides to overtake on a single carriageway road 300 metres ahead of me, I'm going to slam on the anchors, ABS and all, regardless of who's behind me, and what's going to happen is a) They'll go straight into the back of me, b) In so doing, will significantly reduce my braking capabilities, and c) Will add a hell of a lot more kinetic energy into whatever I ultimately run into...

And all this to shave a few minutes off their journey time...?
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Old 17th Jan 2010, 10:26
  #63 (permalink)  
 
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It does amaze (as opposed to surprise) me still when I find 44 tonnes up my backside
Keep off the eggs, eat more fresh fruit, drink fruit juice and I'm also advised that prunes are good...
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Old 17th Jan 2010, 10:41
  #64 (permalink)  
 
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Having 44 tons rammed into your backside could
have the same result.
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Old 17th Jan 2010, 12:26
  #65 (permalink)  
 
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I was once tailgated by a large truck. At the time I was not doing any less than the speed limit, and while I am not proud of it, I simply took my foot off the accelerator, slowing down at such a rate that I did not get rammed. Dropped down from 80 and got to about 15km/h on a single lane country road, then took off again (very quickly). Old mate in the truck had to get all the way back up through his 21 gears. He didnt catch up to me (which makes me very lucky I suppose).

These days I just ignore them, and if they're worrying me enough I just pull over when I can and let them pass, not worth the stress.
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Old 17th Jan 2010, 13:47
  #66 (permalink)  
 
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Personally I can't imagine why anyone would find themselves tailgated by a truck... just drive a bit quicker.
Same goes for people with bumper stickers telling people not to tailgate... just move over and let people through. Prevents frustration building up which can lead to dangerous driving... problem is too many people think that the speed that they are comfortable with is the correct speed to drive at... I've driven with many people who focus on the road two cars lengths ahead instead of 200 yards ahead, who's reactions are appaling and simply have near zero ability to read the road ahead, consequently they're nervous and barely competant.. should the rest of us be forced to limit our progress to theirs ?
And anyone who needs a painted sign to tell them what speed is safe under the prevailing conditions maybe shouldn't hold a licence...
If anyone thinks I must be a young tearaway... I passed my motorcycle test in 1963 and car test in '64; have driven extensively on four continents inc the worst parts of Africa and Middle East and have been involved in only two accidents.. both involving some stupid A#se ramming me from behind while stationary at a red light and a pedestrian crossing... I'll bet they were the sort who drove at the speed limit.
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Old 17th Jan 2010, 13:51
  #67 (permalink)  
 
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Probably just a bit of IMC refresher training ....
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Old 17th Jan 2010, 14:02
  #68 (permalink)  
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Well, Mungo, judging by the rest of your post, I'm surprised you hadn't accelerated through the red light and then you would not have been rammed - your fault, eh?
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Old 17th Jan 2010, 16:16
  #69 (permalink)  
 
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BOAC Well, Mungo, judging by the rest of your post, I'm surprised you hadn't accelerated through the red light and then you would not have been rammed - your fault, eh?
What an inane response

At the red light (Munich '76) I was stuck in traffic... At the pedestrian crossing (UK '98) I was all that stopped the silly cow that rammed me from running down two ladies and a pushchair with child who were on the crossing.. the impact was so hard that it wrote off my four year old Audi... her excuse was that she was attending to her child who was in the rear seat... pathetic... clearly a case of without due care and attention, but because she didn't kill or injure anyone the police are not interested...
Too busy playing with their silly radar pistols in an attempt to boost the coffers...
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Old 17th Jan 2010, 16:39
  #70 (permalink)  
 
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Storminnorm, I think I'll stick to the prunes and fruit juice

And Mungo, I agree with some of your sentiments, a lot of which focus around common sense and good 'roadmanship', but the two scenarios I've found that force you into these situations are through the bloody average speed checks (not in your best interest to exceed the limit!), and on the single carriageway roads with twenty cars in front of you. You're keeping back, but this is just too much for farmer john to take. After all, hay only keeps for so long don't it!
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Old 17th Jan 2010, 16:44
  #71 (permalink)  

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Personally I can't imagine why anyone would find themselves tailgated by a truck... just drive a bit quicker.
When one is on a busy single carriageway road like the A47 in the mornings for example and the flow of traffic is 45 mph, I cannot drive any more quickly than the car in front can I? Or when one is driving in icy and snowy conditions and does not percieve it to be safe to be doing any more than 40 mph?

And lorries tailgate in those circumstances. Cap'n Arr's solution is the one.

Cheers

Whirls
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Old 17th Jan 2010, 22:06
  #72 (permalink)  
 
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Personally I can't imagine why anyone would find themselves tailgated by a truck... just drive a bit quicker.
How about:
Driving in fog.

Driving in heavy rain.

Driving in lane one, about to take a off-slip.

Slowing down for a turn off round a blind bend (I have to do this every night when I get home)....

Etc etc etc etc.
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Old 18th Jan 2010, 06:42
  #73 (permalink)  
 
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Lorries normally operate for a second company which name is frequently visible in big letters, and if you're really lucky you'll even see the phone numbers. Call their principal and ask to talk to the Logistics Manager or General Manager. Be polite, give the general location and registration number of the lorry, tell them that if the lorry doesn't back up right now you will reduce your speed and stop altogether, pull the driver out of the cab and give him one serious work-over and never consider buying any product advertised on the lorry. Did that twice and both times the lorry backed of after a few minutes. I bet the drivers were fuming though. One was a lorry driving free lance for Rockwool, the insulation manufacturer and their Logistics manager was not happy at all, with the lorry driver.
Per
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Old 18th Jan 2010, 07:54
  #74 (permalink)  

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And one I saw a few years ago. I was walking over a footbridge over the motorway near home when I heard a horn going. When I looked down coming towards the bridge there were some wagons in the no. 1 lane with a car overtaking them. Sat about a yard behing the car was a big Volvo with all his lights on (it was one of those with a big row of spots fitted) and his horn blaring. As they came under the bridge I was on the car and lorry got past the queue and the car started pulling in - and at the same time switched on his blue lights and the 'Police Stop' sign popped up in the back window.

Laugh - I really did start.
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Old 18th Jan 2010, 08:35
  #75 (permalink)  
 
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Lorries normally operate for a second company
By definition, any HGV operating for hire or reward does that. Perhaps you mean dedicated contract work, where the vehicle operates exclusively for one customer. Vehicles engaged in general haulage may carry loads for anything up to 30 different clients in a working week, so ringing the company advertised on the side of the trailer may really be just a stab in the dark.

One was a lorry driving free lance for Rockwool
What does freelance mean? If that happened in the UK, it would have Been John Raymond transport of Bridgend, supposing the load hadn't been subbed out. Armchair experts, gotta love 'em.
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Old 18th Jan 2010, 09:21
  #76 (permalink)  
 
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Sprogget. We're talking Norway here, which may also explain my limited vocabulary as English logistics terms are concerned. With free-lance I meant an owner-operator who was hired to cover the peaks in Rockwool's transport requierments. Or so their Logistics manager said. Sorry about the confusion.
Per
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Old 18th Jan 2010, 09:26
  #77 (permalink)  
 
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And with my apologies. The term here is owner driver.
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Old 18th Jan 2010, 09:32
  #78 (permalink)  
 
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Sprogget, no worries. I've learnt something new, always a good thing.
Per
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Old 18th Jan 2010, 09:42
  #79 (permalink)  
 
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I get a bit touchy over lorries.

I trade hgv loads for a living and I'm very good at it. As ever, the vast majority of drivers and companies are professional and forward looking and are working hard in what is a ruthlessly competitive market. There are always idiots in trucks just as there are in cars, on bikes and by foot! Yet it is human nature to generalise and we see this again and again. Personally, I believe anyone who is prepared to get up at 2am, drive a 44ton vehicle for 500 miles, deal with customers and coleagues whilst looking forward to a nice sleep in a cab bunk bed before doing it all again the following day so that we have bread milk, and anything else in our shops deserves a medal. Then again, I'm biased.
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Old 18th Jan 2010, 14:01
  #80 (permalink)  
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deserves a medal.
- or castrating or worse if they tailgate? Then again, I'm biased.
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