Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > PPRuNe Social > Jet Blast
Reload this Page >

Are British Drivers thick?

Jet Blast Topics that don't fit the other forums. Rules of Engagement apply.

Are British Drivers thick?

Old 14th Jan 2010, 09:25
  #41 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Not where I want to be
Age: 66
Posts: 248
In Norway the requirement is unrestricted view in all four directions, if not the fine is 200, no questions asked.
This guy however lost his driving license as well and I do not feel particularly sorry for him. Orket ikke skrape ruten - mistet lappen - Nyheter - Innenriks - Aftenposten.no
Per
Ancient Mariner is offline  
Old 15th Jan 2010, 00:03
  #42 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Posts: 1,292
Never really had a problem in my little Nissan Sentra during Michigan winters - I have found an automatic seems to be easier to drive on snow than a manual, the power/traction thing seems to be smoother.
reynoldsno1 is offline  
Old 15th Jan 2010, 06:43
  #43 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: The Smaller Antipode
Age: 85
Posts: 0
I have found an automatic seems to be easier to drive on snow than a manual, the power/traction thing seems to be smoother
but how do you cope with a flooded road and an automatic ? not easy to keep the engine running fast and slip the clutch, as on a manual.
ExSp33db1rd is offline  
Old 15th Jan 2010, 08:35
  #44 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Not where I want to be
Age: 66
Posts: 248
When you car start sliding on ice (over steer) self-preservation 101 states "floor clutch, counter steer". What does one do with an automatic? Fumble it into N?
Per
Ancient Mariner is offline  
Old 15th Jan 2010, 09:02
  #45 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: .
Posts: 560
How on earth was that pensioner able to drive!?!?!!? Thats unreal. Unless being so close to death she already had a link to the other side and "something" was guiding her!!!

When the snow was bad while slipping along the pavement I passed someone wheel spinning at a junction trying to pull out. She was sat there revving the engine flat out and not moving.

Try second I suggested and don't jump straight on the accelerator.

Second.....can I do that....how do I do that??

I fell over and not because of the ice!!!!!
one post only! is offline  
Old 15th Jan 2010, 11:22
  #46 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: I'm right behind you!!!
Posts: 470
For Companies (Meaning of Pajero) — Chameleon Translations

Meaning of Pajero
Cap'n Arrr is offline  
Old 15th Jan 2010, 12:36
  #47 (permalink)  

Avoid imitations
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Wandering the FIR and cyberspace often at highly unsociable times
Posts: 12,726
but how do you cope with a flooded road and an automatic ? not easy to keep the engine running fast and slip the clutch, as on a manual.
Just keep bottom gear engaged; all you should aim to do is to keep water out of the exhaust and drive slowly enough so as not to generate a bow-wave big enough to flood the engine.
ShyTorque is offline  
Old 15th Jan 2010, 15:46
  #48 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Ashford Kent
Posts: 40
Having driven many automatics for years, (wife only has automatic license), you just keep it in low gear, with brakes partially on and accelerator down enough to raise the revs. I know the brakes won't work to full advantage in water but enough to achieve the result you want. I speak from experience having driven through flooded roads quite few times.
JWP1938 is offline  
Old 15th Jan 2010, 18:59
  #49 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: The Smaller Antipode
Age: 85
Posts: 0
Driving an automatic through flood.

Thanks, that's the technique I suggested to my son who borrowed my car when visiting and rang to ask for advice, and it seemed the logical solution, but I've never had to prove it. Son later rang to say that by the time he was allowed through it was no longer necessary, so I never knew if it would work.
ExSp33db1rd is offline  
Old 15th Jan 2010, 21:34
  #50 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Planet Earth
Posts: 57
Just out of interest - are lorries able to stop incredibly quickly in the snow? Was wondering as last week on a road that had not been gritted and had a good couple of inches of snow on I was tailgated by a HGV whch appeared to be carrying rather inflammable substances. Whilst I was taking a cautious attitude to the road conditions he insisted on driving as close as he could to the back of my car for a good couple of miles. Presumed ,that they have some super powered brakes that can stop them dead quick as I wouldn't have thought any one could have been that stupid if they couldn't and had known they were carrying flammable substances...?
Shropshire Lad is offline  
Old 15th Jan 2010, 21:57
  #51 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Chez Sprog
Posts: 493
Question is, if you're being tailgated by a lorry and thus, presumabkly having it directly behind you, and therefore having the cab fill your rear view mirror, how did you know it ws carrying flammable substances, short of having x-ray vision and thus being able to see through the cab and into the trailer?
Sprogget is offline  
Old 15th Jan 2010, 22:03
  #52 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: NSW, Australia
Posts: 58
Agree with that - although I find the drivers on the Gold Coast worse than the drivers in NSW, where I live.

Inexperience in ice and snow is an obvious problem in Australia - want to see first class numpties head to the Australian ski fields during a snow dump: either driving AWD cars with chains at 15 kph with hazzards flashing, or driving the Subaru/Audi AWD/other AWD at stupidly high speeds. Simply put, 90% have no idea.

Spent a lot of time driving around Whislter BC in my before marriage/children days. The "locals", which I kind of was, all drove 2wd cars without aby problem at all, and most of us had to drive after the ploughs had finished for work. But, huge numbers of visitors, often in 4wds, would spin off, crash and generally create chaos.

Like flying skills - if you are poorly trained and not "current" you will be dangerous.
BrianG is offline  
Old 15th Jan 2010, 23:56
  #53 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Northampton
Posts: 516
Being tailgated by a HGV? Simple solution.

Let them get as close to you as they're going to get, and now, here's the important bit. Let them stay nice and close to you for a minute or two, lead them into a false sense of security. This works best if the road is clear, bright sunny day, not much traffic, as it enhances the effect. This is also an interesting experiment to see how close they're really going to get.

Now, push down on the brake pedal just enough to illuminate your brake lights, and hold them on for a few seconds. Sometimes a slight veer in one direction helps.

It sounds ridiculous, but guaranteed, every time I've performed the procedure, I've received a courtesy flash and enjoyed watching matey's cab sink down slightly under abrupt braking.

Don't get the wrong end of the stick, this is only for the complete p1llocks who sit three metres away from your rear end. Normally happens through avg. speed checks, when you're sat at the limit, or slightly below, and our friend in the HGV knows by exactly how much his speedo overreads, but either can't be arsed to pull over to overtake, or he's been steaming along and failed to see you until it's too late to indicate out and there's a mile long line of cars on the inside lane...

These people are professional drivers...
Halfbaked_Boy is offline  
Old 16th Jan 2010, 04:48
  #54 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Canada
Posts: 451
Originally Posted by Shropshire Lad View Post
Just out of interest - are lorries able to stop incredibly quickly in the snow?
No. One night last winter we were driving home from work, coming up to a red light, our car with snow tires stopped with no problem. HGV in other lane hit his brakes, slid through the light, and eventually came to a stop about a hundred yards down the road... would have trashed our car if he'd still been behind us, but fortunately my girlfriend (who was driving) had switched lanes because she knew he wouldn't be able to stop fast if we did. He was lucky that no-one was going across the junction because he would probably have killed them.

Back on topic, I would have to agree with previous posters that Canadian drivers make British drivers look good. Though they do handle snow better, at least after they've had a week to get a few good crashes in before they start to slow down and brake earlier.
MG23 is offline  
Old 16th Jan 2010, 05:40
  #55 (permalink)  
Psychophysiological entity
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Tweet Rob_Benham Famous author. Well, slightly famous.
Age: 80
Posts: 4,871
In an automatic:

When you car start sliding on ice (over steer) self-preservation 101 states "floor clutch, counter steer". What does one do with an automatic? Fumble it into N?
Per
In all cars, one should tune the power for zero torque. Even the drag on the drive-train is enough to cause the driven wheels to start sliding.

This is not a thing one can 'just do', it has to be practiced.

Hours and hours on lonely roads - remember them? Farm lanes, and disused airfields. Oh, and a few bob in wear and tear.

An extreme example is on a high powered motorcycle. As teh back starts to slide, closing the trottle fully is apt to give one a 'High-sider.' Trust me...one of these precedes gravel-rash by about one second. The throttle HAS to be briskly set to a partially closed point to avoid disaster.
Loose rivets is online now  
Old 16th Jan 2010, 07:03
  #56 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Scotland
Posts: 369
I was kind of secretly hoping to find him further up the road all crumpled up and jack knifed in the ditch, but it didn't happen
Oh yes! But also, it's never happened.

Having driven in many countries, I reckon its "horses for courses" but on balance I reckon that we in UK, probably, have the best drivers.
Romeo Oscar Golf is offline  
Old 16th Jan 2010, 08:19
  #57 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Northern Ireland
Posts: 69
Got a Canadian cousin who lives in Edinburgh, well it was winter so it's Edinbrrr. She had planned to meet some mates in Galway and asked did I want to come. Alright, fair enough.
She wanted to drive and would hire a car at Belfast airport, and would pick me up, get some scra and head off, alright.
This route is like a downwards 45 degree line from the top right corner right across Ireland.

When she arrives, I remark that she's driving an automatic. 'Oh I can't drive a stick shift.' Just shrug, alright.

Don't even reach the border and she's getting more and more nervous at the wheel. It's not too icy, it's not exceptionally wet, ask what's wrong.

'These roads are too narrow.'

Oh for God's sake woman. Swap seats, ignore the automatic, you can treat it like a normal gear box by flicking the gear stick. Drive across Ireland to see people I don't know with a sleeping Canuck in the passenger seat.
Foss is offline  
Old 16th Jan 2010, 13:10
  #58 (permalink)  
Per Ardua ad Astraeus
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 18,582
We've had a few round here clearing snow from their drives to unleash their mighty chariots - and piling the snow onto the road.
BOAC is offline  
Old 16th Jan 2010, 13:28
  #59 (permalink)  
Resident insomniac
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: N54 58 34 W02 01 21
Age: 76
Posts: 1,859
Where else?
G-CPTN is offline  
Old 16th Jan 2010, 15:31
  #60 (permalink)  

Hovering AND talking
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Propping up bars in the Lands of D H Lawrence and Bishop Bonner
Age: 55
Posts: 5,711
Originally Posted by Halfbaked Boy
Now, push down on the brake pedal just enough to illuminate your brake lights, and hold them on for a few seconds.
That is actually quite dangerous and not recommended by any motoring organisations. The best way is just to slow down using the engine and/or gears and not to use the brake. Anything that could someone to overreact suddenly could be dangerous for many.

I agree that it is dangerous, intimidating and sometimes quite scary when HGVs drive so close that your rear view mirror is filled with nothing but radiator grille and SCANIA and we have more than our fair share of them in Norfolk but braking is not the best tactic.

Cheers

Whirls
Whirlygig is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.