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Police Statements

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Police Statements

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Old 26th Oct 2008, 11:46
  #61 (permalink)  
 
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The major problem with making a witness statement is that it may result in you having to testify in court as a witness. That is when they really start to **** you about. It's a difficult one. On one hand you sort of have a moral duty to help out the victim, as the next victim could be you. One the other hand the criminal justice system really has no respect for anybody outside of their narrow band of incompetants. Would I be a witness again? Well, I suppose I would be, but if they started any of their nonsense again then I would just pull out and tell them to sod off. Only loser is the victim.

And where has all the billions of our money gone in the public services ? On salaries of course with little or no increase in productivity to show for it. Increased salaries mean increased final salary pension payments. Time to do some major hacking on the public payroll I say, and if that means getting rid of a load of police officers who refuse to have a proper attitude towards the decent public person going out of his way to make a witness statement then so be it.
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Old 26th Oct 2008, 14:13
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Working Hard, of course you may. With all the money that would be saved you could have as many copies as you like...
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Old 26th Oct 2008, 16:51
  #63 (permalink)  
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Beethoven thank you for lightening this thread a little. It is a shame that there appears to be e plethora of "rule booke coppers" around these days. Good luck to all those who have a sense of duty and have proper moral values.
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Old 26th Oct 2008, 17:31
  #64 (permalink)  
 
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YouTube - The Police - Don't Stand So Close To Me: Video

A police statement!
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Old 27th Oct 2008, 00:47
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I once very gently interrupted an assault upon a woman in the subway and identified the perp to the authorities; then gave my statement.

Years passed as the perp had trouble retaining a lawyer or showing up or the new lawyer needed time to prepare

But finally one day we had the trial and my statement was suddenly thrust upon me while I was on the stand. It was not much good for refreshing my memory as I could barely read the plod's handwriting

The lead copper and I talked on the subway back to our jobs; he was relieved that the trial was finally held so that he could go into retirement. The perp was one of his regular customers and he was glad to be done with him
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Old 11th Jan 2018, 15:20
  #66 (permalink)  
 
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Angry Witness statements

I am currently in a situation, where I gave a statement, witnessing the actions of a defendant in an abh case, breach his bail conditions, the victim being with me at the time.

The defendant pleaded guilty to the breach. I am not being called as a witness in the abh case. However, the defendant has made it clear on social media, that after the abh trial, he will be posting the statements.

The CPS, superintendent, witness welfare officers and the PCs involved have all stated, the defendant is allowed to have posession of the statements. The only thing to do is give another statement based on witness intimidation. Really???
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Old 11th Jan 2018, 20:34
  #67 (permalink)  
 
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As part of disclosure the defence will be given copies of statements although these may be sanitised if any parts are deemed sensitive. They don't get the reverse page with the witnesses personal details on.
I'm sure you can Google witness intimidation and decide yourself if their behaviour amounts to such.
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Old 12th Jan 2018, 12:59
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I have recently been involved with the police as a potential witness in a murder case. In order to take my statement two DCs (one male one female) had to drive from an adjacent county and it took several telephone conversations to arrange a mutually convenient date and time. During one of the calls I offered to compose my statement and email it to them in order to save their (and my) time but this was not acceptable as it apparently had to be taken down by one of the officers in person. I did feel that there was an element of his words rather than mine being used but I did however agree with the final version and duly signed it and the aerial (drone) shots of the scene. (I didn't ask for copies).

I have to say that I was most impressed with the thoroughness with which the two DCs went about their task - my boots and outer clothing worn on the day were taken away for examination (and returned promptly), fur samples from my dogs were taken, copies of the tread pattern from my vehicle etc etc and at no time were they anything other than friendly, polite and professional.
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Old 12th Jan 2018, 13:09
  #69 (permalink)  
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Olympus, no imputation, but their behaviour in that last sentence is a known interrogation technique

You got soft cop soft cop
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Old 12th Jan 2018, 13:46
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At my last house I was approached by police to allow them to use a back bedroom as an observation point for a suspected drug dealer. They were there for two days before raiding the place. They were very friendly, but the only mark of appreciation I received afterwards was a bottle of "British Sherry".
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Old 12th Jan 2018, 14:21
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My experience with the police in the past few years has been mixed. Sometimes they have been outstandingly good at their job, very professional, and even going out of their way to make sure I was OK (as in the phone calls I received to update me and ask if I was doing OK, or if they could help by passing me a list of counselling services after I'd nearly killed a runner, crossing a dual carriageway - not my fault at all).

Other times they've been patently incompetent, as I related here in this post: Dashboard cameras


In defence of the latter lot, they were, apparently, Specials, who had decided to set up a road side random stop to check for drink-drivers, without telling their Traffic Division colleagues, Judging from the letter I received from an inspector in Traffic I rather suspect these guys were give a bit of "re-training"..............

This is a link to the post describing the outcome: Dashboard cameras

Last edited by VP959; 12th Jan 2018 at 14:33.
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Old 12th Jan 2018, 16:21
  #72 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by VP959 View Post
In defence of the latter lot, they were, apparently, Specials
I once spent a shift with some Specials, and those two were very good. Especially the woman, in her 30s, day job as a secretary, her idea of a Friday night out was to leave the babies with her husband and go out on patrol!
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Old 12th Jan 2018, 22:35
  #73 (permalink)  
 
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Since nearly everyone has a mobile phone these days, and they nearly all have a recording device, what is the view on the the witness recording the taking of the statement - especially if it's in your own home?
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Old 13th Jan 2018, 02:46
  #74 (permalink)  
 
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Perfectly acceptable to record what you want, so long as all parties concerned are advised and consent to the events are being recorded. Police routinely record interviews held in police premises, so if they are unhappy with you recording events in your own home, no doubt they will be happy to take you down to the station to do it properly!
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Old 13th Jan 2018, 05:25
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An interesting topic. Back in the mists of time, perhaps 1959 or 1960, my father was driving home from work and was waiting at a junction, about to join an 'A' road, when the heard an almighty bang. As he joined the 'A' road, he could see the wreckage of 2 Jaguars. He stopped to see what could be done but the occupants were all either dead or dying and the cars had obviously hit each other head on. One car carried 2 middle aged couples who were just coming to the end of a rally (they were about 1 mile from the finish) and the other was carrying either 3 or 4 teenagers. Bodies were strewn everywhere, with one girl having gone from the back seat of her car, through 2 windscreens and out through the small rear window of the other car. All her clothing had been stripped off on that journey and she was obviously dead. After the police had arrived on scene and taken over, Dad came home and he was visibly very shaken, with a neighbour giving him some rum to settle his nerves. He had previously done 2 spells in the R.N. and was used to scenes of death & destruction but this hit him quite hard.
A few days after the accident, which made headline news in most of the press, the police appealed for witnesses. Although my Dad had given a statement at the scene, he went along to the police station and asked if he could be of further help. His was the only other vehicle anywhere near the scene at the time. The Sergeant at the desk was quite rude to him and told him to sod off, they didn't want anything more from him.
Dad came to the conclusion, subsequently borne out at the inquest, that despite Dad's observation that the culprit was most likely the one carrying the rallying couples, the police seemed most anxious to put the blame on the driver of the other car, a teenager who had apparently taken his father's car without permission and was joyriding. Dad's statement carried no weight at the inquest (in fact I think it was never brought in). What the plod didn't know was that my father had recently become a magistrate and from that day forward he would never take the evidence of a lone policeman as honest. Only if a policeman gave evidence that was corroborated by others would he take any notice of the police. I found it quite shocking that my father's attitude to the police had been so radically affected by this. Prior to this, he had been a proper "the police must be listened to" type of bloke.
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Old 13th Jan 2018, 09:42
  #76 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by G0ULI View Post
Perfectly acceptable to record what you want, so long as all parties concerned are advised and consent to the events are being recorded. Police routinely record interviews held in police premises, so if they are unhappy with you recording events in your own home, no doubt they will be happy to take you down to the station to do it properly!
Which raises an interesting point if, like me, you always drive with a dash cam running. Mine records HD video and audio all the time the car is turned on, and for 5 minutes after the car is turned off. As the car can often be in electric mode, especially when stationary, I rarely bother to turn it off when just stopping for a while and staying in the car, as was the case with my encounter with the unlawful breath test guys.

During that encounter I'd forgotten the thing was recording (having had one for years now you do just tend to forget it's on all the time). Right at the end of the encounter I remembered, and informed the police officers that the camera had been running the whole time, but that was only after the event.

Had they objected I suspect they could have asked me to delete the recording, or perhaps even confiscated the camera, but they didn't, which I assumed, rightly or wrongly, gave me consent to keep it and publish it on YouTube.

I didn't set out to deliberately record this encounter, it was accidental, as I didn't think to turn the dashcam off (it switches on and off automatically when the car powers up or down).

Where do people stand who have dashcams, cyclecams, CCTV etc, where something might be inadvertently recorded? They cannot ask for permission to record in advance, so is it OK to just state that something has been recorded after the event, and wait to see the response?
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Old 13th Jan 2018, 09:49
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It's all very well offering to provide your own statement but they are more than just the witnesses account.
How many people would know to include ADVOCAT where identification was an issue? Know which points to prove to cover or what lines of defence may need to be addressed or negated?
That's the problem with Policing. Everyone thinks they know how it's done and what should be done because they've watched Morse or Minority report.
I tire of explaining that we can't track every individual everywhere through CCTV or their phones.
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Old 13th Jan 2018, 09:55
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VP959
Assuming you're in the UK the Police have no power to make you delete your recording or confiscate your device.
Nor should they be concerned about being recorded.
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Old 13th Jan 2018, 10:14
  #79 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Tashengurt View Post
VP959
Assuming you're in the UK the Police have no power to make you delete your recording or confiscate your device.
Nor should they be concerned about being recorded.

Thanks for that, it's reassuring to know, especially as I'd need to find and dig the manual out to work out how to turn it off manually, as I've long since forgotten................
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Old 13th Jan 2018, 16:49
  #80 (permalink)  
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VP, household webcams abound too. I read last year that if your cameras capture images in public areas then, as with businesses, they should be registered, their use displayed and contact phone numbers listed.

I think where they only record images of people on your private property you are OK.

This would seem to suggest dashcam recording should also fall within the FOR remit.
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