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A Drum Kit for Xmas

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A Drum Kit for Xmas

Old 1st Dec 2007, 23:43
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A Drum Kit for Xmas

OMG...yes... my 12 yr old wants a Drum Kit for Xmas!!!!

Any advice on this ???? I live in a Street in a Town and don't have a huge amount of space..so it will be in his room!! Also...not sure how it will affect the neighbours.

He is not a really outgoing person..so will never be going to be the frontman of a Jimmy Hendrix on a guitar or a Bono with the singing..but has a real interest in music and maybe this is his chance to 'play' in the background ...me thinks!!!!!!

Have tried to push him towards the piano/organ etc or even a wind instrument ,,,but no joy. HE WANT DRUMS!!!

Help.....or should I be the encouraging Dad and throw caution to the wind!!!

Maybe he could be the next Buddy Rich!!! or even (nooooooooo!!!!) Phil Collins!!

Sikky
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Old 1st Dec 2007, 23:51
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Sounds like fun. Perhaps practice pads are the solution? - http://www.jhs.co.uk/softapads.html







p.s. of course you get to play them when he goes to school
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Old 1st Dec 2007, 23:56
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We have a 15yr old who is heavily into his music, mainly guitar but he also wants a drum kit. We have bought him a roll-up drum kit that plugs into the USB port of his PC. If he develops from that we will probably get him one of the Yamaha Drum machines - the electronic drums have the virtue of being compact and can be played on headphones - protects the sanity of the rest of the household.
Good luck
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Old 2nd Dec 2007, 00:01
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We brought our lad, now 13 a drum kit a couple of years ago. Not to be played befor 1000 and not after 1800. No complaints from the neighbours as yet.
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Old 2nd Dec 2007, 00:02
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Have you considered the possibility of refusing his request?

Or do I come from a different era...
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Old 2nd Dec 2007, 00:20
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Nice
 
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Get him the drums, but only in the garage or somewhere else suitable (ie the moon). Wish I'd been allowed to carry on.
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Old 2nd Dec 2007, 00:22
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Bluey
 
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Have you considered the possibility of refusing his request?
That's the option that many parents will not even consider, though.

If you do go ahead, practice pads will remove the problem of excess noise and reasonable times could be set for playing the drums themselves.

Just as an aside ... I don't think I would have dared to ask for such an expensive present, Sikpupi ... does your son have any idea what he is asking of you?

Perhaps, like mini, I come from a different era ....
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Old 2nd Dec 2007, 00:28
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jeez you're a harsh bunch - 200-300 would cover it easily and they're quiet if practice pads are used
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Old 2nd Dec 2007, 00:44
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Wunderbra
 
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Have you noticed him growing excess body hair and developing a taste for banana's?

Drumming!

Sorry, couldn't resist a chance to post that, I love it!

But yes, an electronic version will save the sanity of yourselves and the neighbours.

Maybe you could also/instead invest in drum lessons, either at school or outside, that way he would also get to experience the "real thing" and have a chance to develop his talents.
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Old 2nd Dec 2007, 00:59
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...A 5-piece set cost Eur299 over here. Not unreasonable as his only request for a Xmas present from his parents ! An Xbox is Eur349 - a BMX is Eur300++...thats the normal 'entry' present these days....!!! 12 year old boys don't play cowboys and indians any more.....and not many parents around here remember waking up on Xmas morning to an Orange as their present!! We are in the consumer age.....everything is to be had in your local store. !!

You see...I want him to get an interest in music..... I feel it is a good outlet for kids - especially in their teens....rather have him practicing for some 'school gig' than hanging on street corners!
Must say.. I am not 100% up for the idea. He has asked and I've replied in the fatherly way "we'll see, Son". Non committal - thats me!!!
Sikky
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Old 2nd Dec 2007, 01:19
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Sprucegoose
 
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Finally a subject I can comment on with some authority!

Not sure how far your budget stretches, but may I suggest you buy him a Gretsch Catalina Jazz kit. From what I can find on the internet they sell for just under 500 quid in the UK. The reason I suggest this kit is three fold, firstly the quality is excellent and will last him, even if he takes his passion pro at some stage, Charlie Watts has played the exact same kit for around 30 years now!

Being a Jazz kit the drum sizes are smaller and it will take up less room! Don't let him get swayed by the modern rock acts who have ridiculous 26" bass drums, an 18" Gretsch bass puts out a kick arse thump!

Finally Gretsch quality is second to none, all their kits come with good quality skins they will last a long time and produce a great sound, as someone said earlier, invest in a set of practice pads and the neighbours won't even know he has a kit.

Make sure he gets lessons, as boring as they may seem to young uns it is important to have a good grounding in musical knowledge, I didn't and I am now taking lessons to unlearn all my bad playing habits!

Finally whatever you do, don't let him click on cymbalholics.com otherwise your wallet will be empty forever, just ask Mrs hughes!

On the subject of cymbals, don't even bother with brass, they will be cracked within months! Try to get bronze cymbals and if you can afford it cymbals made of B20 alloy. If you buy good quality second hand cymbals they will retain their value, you may even make a profit, I have sold a number of cymbals for more than I paid for them.

Good luck, HH.
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Old 2nd Dec 2007, 07:26
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Bought my lad one last year, with the proviso of timing considerations re neighbours and my shift pattern. He's got better but not by much tbh. I can usually manage 15 mins or so of the house working itself to the earths core then resort to the tradition of the bellowing of "Daaaavvvvvviiiiiiddddd" at ever increasing volume til he desists, and goes back to more typical teenage activities, msn, playstation and eating us out of house and home.
My daughter wants an electric guitar for xmas. "It'll be like the White Stripes" said Mrs SB. No it won't. Anything like them.
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Old 2nd Dec 2007, 08:46
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Another thing to consider is the novelty wearing off factor, yer Teen has a very short enthusiasm span, of all chrisy presents that swiftly end up untouched gathering dust in various cupboards musical instruments are the most common,(there are those that would argue that yer drums is not actually a musical instrument)and yer drum kit takes up just as much room as a dust gatherer as it did as a noise maker.
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Old 2nd Dec 2007, 09:10
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Ya can't beat the clarionet (sic) for being a compact (and mellow) instrument.
Getting onto a bus with a drum kit tends to be problematical.
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Old 2nd Dec 2007, 09:24
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BRL
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Hi. Have a look at something like this Electronic Drum Kit

This will give you more room and you can also plug a set of headphones into them and listen that way. No practise pads needed!!!!

He can use them for a while and see if it is for him, if he goes off the idea of drumming then these are easily re-sold and hold their price well.

Get him a selection of sticks to try, light ones to use on the electric kit and med/heavy ones for a real kit. I used to love using the heaviest sticks possible, still got one from years ago here, a Zildjian 'Rock' in red!!!!! It is like holding a baseball bat, it's massive, just dug it out to have a look.

Nowdays I prefer to use a lighter stick, must be me age or something but I love using light 5B's or 4A's, much easier on the old wrist.

Let us know what you decide to get for him...
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Old 2nd Dec 2007, 09:37
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Only problem with electronic drum kits is they tend to cover up flaws in technique! That is probably good for the people who are listening early on, but not good for long term development.

Get an acoustic kit to begin with.
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Old 2nd Dec 2007, 09:46
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BRL
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HH. If he is just starting out then I can't see a problem with him using an eleccy one or a normal one. Same principle, kick drum, hi-hat snare and toms just a lot quieter.

To be honest I would rather see an eleccy one get battered whilst practising then an traditional one if you get what I mean!!!

Gotta look after these old kits eh!!!!!!
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Old 2nd Dec 2007, 13:10
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Roland V-Drums a bit more expensive but they sound great

www.thomann.de usually have the best deals and free delivery
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Old 2nd Dec 2007, 14:07
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Some advice for your son from one who appreciates a good drummer.

A drum kit isn't much use without a band to play it in. Does he have any mates with music in their veins? My own experience is that after a few glasses, my rythm goes to hell and I need a drummer. The other drunken bums at the bar don't notice and their singing is out of tune anyhow, but we musical types need a drummer to lay down the beat. Drumming on its own leaves a lot to be desired but good music needs drums.
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Old 2nd Dec 2007, 14:33
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BlackSheep....he is only 12 yrs old. No band thoughts yet but hopefully he should be in pole position come his mid-teens when bands usually get together. I know all the local schools have Music as a major subject and this regular monthly inhouse 'gigs' in front the rest of the school.

His older sister is 15yr and is into the guitar and is in the Church Choir. School Music and Town Music Society. However...she has Eric Claptons fingers (long and boney) and never had problem with chords. She has a great outlet with the music...and hopefully she will help him along!

Sikky
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