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The english language..whats happening to it?

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The english language..whats happening to it?

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Old 22nd Feb 2007, 08:35
  #81 (permalink)  
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‘boondocks’
Tagalog and Malay have many similarities and the equivalent Malay word is Bundu. Bundu refers to the mud walls of padi fields - Bunds. So, "out in the Bundu" or "out in the Boondocks" both mean well away from town, way out in the country.

I've always found 'boondocks' was mostly used in American English whereas British military useage -from whence many of our foreign additions originate - more often referred to 'bundu'.
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Old 22nd Feb 2007, 10:00
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Originally Posted by Spui18 View Post
Is it therefore so surprising that when several hundred of non-native English speaking people start using English as their international communications language, it gets distorted and many "foreign" words or derivitives thereof are being used or the gramati...gramatical...gramman..eeerr....language rules are being broken?

Yeahbutnobut English is much more standardised than it used to me - mainly due to printing I suppose.
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Old 22nd Feb 2007, 10:21
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Boondocks

You are certainly right about the connection between Tagalog (and most of the other Filipino Languages) and Malay. All part of the Austonesian group. I also agree that ‘boonies’ or ‘boondocks’ entered American English via our military presences in these areas. ‘Boondocks’ would mean ‘hills’ or ‘mountains’ in Filipino.

The Cousins fought the longest war in their history in the Philippines in an attempt to subjugate the peoples there.

However, I question the fact that ‘bundu’ and its usage came from our time in Malaya. Surely it came ‘Out of Africa’ where the word in some of the native languages means ‘prairie’ which comes closer to my perception of the meaning of the word in English English..

On the other hand, it may have reached Africa via the Malays who were incredible navigators and most certainly did reach the shores of Africa.
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Old 22nd Feb 2007, 13:57
  #84 (permalink)  
 
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Has anyone noticed how the 'and' has started to disappear when pronouncing the year? 'Meedja' types seem to have started it - I've noticed it on radio advertising recently, and even the redoubtable Anne Robinson seems to be using it on that quiz show of hers. If our Colonial cousins want to pronounce it 'two thousand-seven', that's fine with me, but if we must copy everything they say and do, can't we have something sensible for a change, such as being able to turn into the flowing traffic at a red light?
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Old 22nd Feb 2007, 16:30
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And another thing .....

The use of "could of" instead of "could have" e.g " I could of gone home" - even when the numpties write it down they use "of" instead of "have".
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Old 22nd Feb 2007, 19:01
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One might be better off using a proper abbreviation:

could'v
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Old 22nd Feb 2007, 21:00
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Surely it's could've.

At least Sainsbury's have introduced "5 items or fewer" rather than less.

I loathe the use of the word good as in:

"How are you?"

"I'm good."

No you're not, that's a moral judgement for others to make, you may mean that you are well.

While I'm at it, what in the name of all that is holy is "WELLNESS"?
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Old 22nd Feb 2007, 21:14
  #88 (permalink)  
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I and I bin thinkin' that all this be an politricks outvention of the followers of the Whore of Babylon to continue the downpression of the Rastafari....
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Old 22nd Feb 2007, 21:39
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I could of gone home.
No, no, no. It's I could've went home.
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Old 22nd Feb 2007, 21:42
  #90 (permalink)  
 
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Or in Geordie,
"Am gannin yem"
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Old 22nd Feb 2007, 21:59
  #91 (permalink)  
 
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And what about 911?! Fair enough for our American friends but for us Brits? What happened on the 9th of November anyway?!! Then 7/7 started...aaaargh!!
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Old 22nd Feb 2007, 22:58
  #92 (permalink)  
 
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K A - I've just gone right off you, because you have made me try to engage the few brain cells I have left, and that hurts. The 'countable' and 'uncountabe' concept is not one I was taught, although as soon as you mention it, it makes sense. Out of interest, can you come up with an example where my rule would fail?

My suspitions are that what you are calling 'uncountable' are de facto singular.

Back on topic-
"So and so was incredibly so and so".
Sorry - I do not believe it.
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Old 22nd Feb 2007, 23:24
  #93 (permalink)  

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I recall a youthful American of my acquaintance using a British slang word, 'humongous', to whit.

I blame that Harry Potter myself.
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Old 23rd Feb 2007, 01:11
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Allan907,
Oh no it isn't !!

Quote:
So does anybody except me get annoyed by all these 'americanisms' or new slang words and phrases that are creeping into everyday English?
Maybe I'm just miserable but what's with all the new lingo? Things like:
The cops,
'Bunches' of people, cars, money, etc.. surely fruit occurs in bunches?!
Can I get, rather than, can I have,
spring break, rather than half term,
Bad things now seem to 'suck' instead of being rubbish or c%%p,
and kids saying... and it was like, and I was like, and she was like, and I was like and they were like, whatever.
And , of course,the over- use of the word so, ie, 'that is so not funny'.
Now my English isn't the greatest in the land and I doubt I'll overtake Shakespeare in the literary stakes but is it just me who hates the way our language is going?
Pedant mode - OFF

If you're going to assume the role of pedagog, I suggest you yourself learn the proper use of quotation marks!
Have a look through your own corrected post again and see if you can count how many you've left out!
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Old 23rd Feb 2007, 01:50
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I say Synthetic, did you know that supernormal theories contain fewer infinities than normal theories. Not that they can be counted of course...
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Old 23rd Feb 2007, 02:18
  #96 (permalink)  
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The english language..whats happening to it?

Please note, I am trying to do my bit, see here!
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Old 23rd Feb 2007, 07:51
  #97 (permalink)  
 
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"Do-able".
"Possible", please, or "it can be done".

In the same vein: One may "continue", "endure" or "be in progress" but never on-go.

And while I'm here, 9/11 two-thousand one makes my piles itch as well. Any fellow feeling one has for the cousins evaporates in the face of such linguistic barbarism!

I blame Murdoch and his diabolic Sky TV. He is responsible for the import(ation) into Britain of such modern Americanisms including the horrors "at the top of the hour" ("On the hour" is much more economic) and " Ten after ten" (Ten past ten, please).
GGRRRRRRR!
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Old 23rd Feb 2007, 11:20
  #98 (permalink)  
 
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More-ish.......WTF??!
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Old 23rd Feb 2007, 14:17
  #99 (permalink)  
 
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I find it rather ironic Mr Spui that you question a harmless adjective with an abbreviated profanity
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Old 23rd Feb 2007, 14:29
  #100 (permalink)  
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J.A.F.O.: dialogue in prairie law office:

Senior partner to articled student: "Good morning! And how are we today?"

Articled student to senior partner: "Real good".

Senior partner to articled student: "Well! Well! Well!"
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