Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > PPRuNe Social > Jet Blast
Reload this Page >

10 books to read before you die...

Jet Blast Topics that don't fit the other forums. Rules of Engagement apply.

10 books to read before you die...

Old 10th Sep 2006, 18:05
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: LGW
Age: 35
Posts: 104
10 books to read before you die...

Inspired by boring top 100 something or others TV programmes, thought I'd introduce this thread to see what fellow Pruners thought were some books WELL worth reading...?

Don't need to be about flying although my nomination happens to be.

Fate is the Hunter by Ernest K Gann

ISBN 0-671-63603-0

Great read; any others?
aw8565 is offline  
Old 10th Sep 2006, 18:13
  #2 (permalink)  

The Veloceraptor of Lounge Lizards
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: From here the view is lovely
Posts: 339
Chicken Hawk by Robert Mason. No ideas of the ISBN number but a truly gut wrenching view of the Vietnam war from a helicopter pilot's view.
verticalhold is offline  
Old 10th Sep 2006, 18:17
  #3 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: LGW
Age: 35
Posts: 104
I've heard good things about that book, some of them on these forums. Despatcher at work keeps saying he'll bring it in for me in exchange for Tornado Down.
aw8565 is offline  
Old 10th Sep 2006, 18:17
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Southampton
Posts: 659
I was inspired after reading this book: Endurance by Alfred Lansing.

Its the story of Sir Earnest Shackleton's ill fated trip to the south pole. It doesn't seem possible that they survived all that time on the ice given the equipment they had and you wonder if anyone would survive todays if they didn't have modern creature comforts.

And his journey to South Georgia was amazing. If he'd missed the island the next stop was S Africa. No satnav just dead reckoning.

Truely facinating.
Saintsman is offline  
Old 10th Sep 2006, 18:20
  #5 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: LGW
Age: 35
Posts: 104
Yep I'll second that, probably re-read that more than any other book I have! And not a single fatality...
aw8565 is offline  
Old 10th Sep 2006, 18:24
  #6 (permalink)  
Whatthef***!?!
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: The Isle of Rockall
Age: 43
Posts: 121
Laugh you may, but i'd recommend The Perfect Storm..the film is ok, the book is truly excellent
colmac747 is offline  
Old 10th Sep 2006, 18:31
  #7 (permalink)  
Location, Location, Location
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: If it moves, watch it like a hawk: If it doesn't, hit it with a hammer until it does...
Age: 56
Posts: 142
Chickenhawk by Robert Mason
ISBN 0 552 12419 2

There you go vh, just pulled out my 20-year-old well-thumbed copy to look it up.

and as a 'side-salad'

Dispatches by Michael Herr
ISBN 0 330 25573 8
mocoman is offline  
Old 10th Sep 2006, 18:35
  #8 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: 18A
Age: 34
Posts: 405
again,dont know the ISBN, but A Million Little Pieces by James Frey,drugs,rehabilitation,forbidden love and a very sad ending.absolutely fantastic read and a true story i believe.

Last edited by tiggerific_69; 10th Sep 2006 at 18:38. Reason: terrible punctuation!
tiggerific_69 is offline  
Old 10th Sep 2006, 19:01
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: France
Posts: 2,319
"The Ghost of Flight 401", by John G. Fuller.

My copy is so old it doesn't have an ISBN number.

Read it with an open mind.

And, of course:
"Catch 22" by Joseph Heller.
ChristiaanJ is offline  
Old 10th Sep 2006, 20:14
  #10 (permalink)  
Recidivist
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Essex, UK
Posts: 1,239
'Noddy gets into trouble'

Hat, coat, ejector seat
frostbite is offline  
Old 10th Sep 2006, 20:16
  #11 (permalink)  
Whatthef***!?!
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: The Isle of Rockall
Age: 43
Posts: 121
lol..another spray over the keyboard tonight
colmac747 is offline  
Old 10th Sep 2006, 20:30
  #12 (permalink)  

Humus Motor
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: A little place called Samsonite
Posts: 201
Sailing Alone Around the World by Joshua Slocum.

It was published at the turn of the century (19th-20th, that is) and records the first man to do what the title says - in the late 19th century - with a tin clock for navigation. I'm not a sailor but this is completely inspiring and utterly modest for what was an extraordinary feat.

Not in print, but I've seen it on Ebay.
Earthmover is offline  
Old 10th Sep 2006, 20:32
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: number 1 at the end of the bar
Posts: 88
" The Rainbow and the Rose" by Nevil Shute.

A wonderful novel.
Scroll Lock is offline  
Old 10th Sep 2006, 20:33
  #14 (permalink)  
SXB
Riding the Euro Gravy Plane
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Strasbourg
Posts: 455
Excellent thread, I spend half my life on planes and in airports and am always looking for new reading material, which is more difficult than you may think.

My brain is quite small and simplistic so my ideal novel would contain several secret agents, at least one nuclear submarine, lots of fighter bomber type aircraft, a President of the US who is just a normal guy who 'sinks a few' with the Secret Service, several aircraft carriers and a hero who is irresistable to the opposite sex, can beat up absolutely anyone and always has a smartarse comment for those in authority.

Bearing the above in mind my nominations would be 'The Shark Mutiny' by Patrick Robinson ISBN 0-09-940527-X and 'Memorial Day' by Vince Flynn ISBN 0-7432-6874-1
SXB is offline  
Old 10th Sep 2006, 20:42
  #15 (permalink)  
SXB
Riding the Euro Gravy Plane
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Strasbourg
Posts: 455
" The Rainbow and the Rose" by Nevil Shute.

A wonderful novel.
Not withstanding my previous comments absolutely anything written by Nevil Shute is an outstanding read, I think he wrote something like 23 or 24 novels and all of them are first class and I've read all of them. I think 'Lonely Road' was his first and 'trustee from the toolroom' his last. From an aviation point of view 'No highway' is a good read and for a look into the future read 'On the Beach' My personal favourite was 'The Pied Piper'

I believe Nevil Shute died in the early 1960's and from the way his books were written I assume he was an Australian, though I don't know.
SXB is offline  
Old 10th Sep 2006, 20:50
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: CHESHIRE
Age: 51
Posts: 60
Angel

'Birdsong' by Sebastian Faulks; beautifully written but graphic account of 1st World War. Anything by him is worth a look though but that particularly stands out as being exceptional, in my view.
gorgeous spotter is offline  
Old 10th Sep 2006, 20:56
  #17 (permalink)  
Ohcirrej
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: This is the internet FFS.........
Posts: 2,921
Originally Posted by tiggerific_69 View Post
again,dont know the ISBN, but A Million Little Pieces by James Frey,drugs,rehabilitation,forbidden love and a very sad ending.absolutely fantastic read and a true story i believe.
Ummmm............I really hate to dispel the magic of the book, but Mr Frey made quite a bit of that book up. Oprah tore shreds off him for "duping" her when she announced it's inclusion in her book club. It's now sold as a work of fiction.
Jerricho is offline  
Old 10th Sep 2006, 20:58
  #18 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Posts: 1,293
any thing by William Boyd (that's any book, not the title of the book)
any thing by Beryl Bainbridge
"The Wasp Factory" by Iain Banks - probably the most original debut novel ever written ....
reynoldsno1 is offline  
Old 10th Sep 2006, 21:04
  #19 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: manchester
Posts: 156
nevil shute norway (englishman) is an ace author.
a town like alice.
a goodish film but the book is far far better.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nevil_Shute
ormus55 is offline  
Old 10th Sep 2006, 21:04
  #20 (permalink)  

Humus Motor
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: A little place called Samsonite
Posts: 201
Originally Posted by SXB View Post
I believe Nevil Shute died in the early 1960's and from the way his books were written I assume he was an Australian, though I don't know.
I fully agree about his superb writing. My favourite is 'An Old Captivity.'

Nevil Shute's full name was Nevil Shute Norway and he was British I believe - and was the chief mathematician on the design of the R100 airship (the one that didn't crash). I once read his autobiography but can't find it now - and that would be another to add to the list!!
Earthmover is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.