Interviews, jobs & sponsorship The forum where interviews, job offers and selection criteria can be discussed and exchanged.

HR Interview Questions

Old 3rd Aug 2008, 18:13
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Hades.
Posts: 753
HR Interview Questions

Hi Mods,
I know you will move this to an appropriate forum but I wanted to get it rolling.
I'm hoping for an interview for training and am trying to find something about non-tech questions, the sort of thing asked by HR (bless them )
You know the sort of thing, along the lines of:

'Tell us about the time you...........
How would you deal with........... etc

It doesn't have to be all for training interviews, a broad spectrum of airline appropriate info' would be good.

If there are some good answers, and we don't end up in JetBlast, maybe it could be a sticky

regards,
H-D
helen-damnation is offline  
Old 3rd Aug 2008, 18:53
  #2 (permalink)  
Warning Toxic!
Disgusted of Tunbridge
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Hampshire, UK
Posts: 4,011
Well following the rules and guidelines of the organisation you are trying to be involved with would be a good way to start! Do you think you will get where you want to go by riding roughshod over them?
Rainboe is offline  
Old 3rd Aug 2008, 19:22
  #3 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Hades.
Posts: 753
helen-damnation is offline  
Old 3rd Aug 2008, 19:46
  #4 (permalink)  
Warning Toxic!
Disgusted of Tunbridge
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Hampshire, UK
Posts: 4,011
Wel try and work it out! This is your chance to think for yourself how to conduct yourself in relation to the world around you and how it runs, and what rules it sets and whether you intend to even try and abide by them!
Rainboe is offline  
Old 3rd Aug 2008, 20:27
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Australia
Posts: 157
What is wrong with not knowing the questions and just answering them honestly and not rehearsing them. The problem with the aviation industry and the selection of managers we have now is because they have been coached with their answers and then when confronted with the problems of the real world make the wrong decisions.

If you cheat the system then expect some one to cheat you one day.
vortsa is offline  
Old 4th Aug 2008, 09:48
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Currently within the EU
Posts: 312
What is wrong with not knowing the questions and just answering them honestly and not rehearsing them. The problem with the aviation industry and the selection of managers we have now is because they have been coached with their answers and then when confronted with the problems of the real world make the wrong decisions.
Well said!
Sallyann1234 is offline  
Old 4th Aug 2008, 10:02
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: London
Posts: 1,582
Something of a response.....

I don't know how many of our readers have had proper Interview training. Apols if you know it all. I'll have to be a little careful with this, as I've possibly interviewed a number of the readers....
Rule 1. Hypothetical questions in an interview are fairly useless as an interviewing technique. However, untrained (and lazy) interviewers like them, so you might well get a few. There is no real way of preparing for them - just think up a few for yourself, and have confident replies ready.
Rule 2. Your past behaviour is the best guide to your future behaviour. Thus, "Tell us about a situation when" is the sort of question that a good interviewer will ask you. S/he is trying to find out what you actually did in a variety of situations. "Tell us about a situation when you had to.... (act quickly/think fast/disagree with a boss/do something you did not want to do) are all possibles. There are many ways of constructing these questions. By and large they are looking for a story, and your part in that story - what you did, in some detail. The way to get thru them is to be honest, succinct, open and no b.s.........Prep. involves thinking about the things they will be interested in, and thinking of relevant times in your life when you've exhibited the behaviours that you think they will want/expect.
It's called Behavioural Event Interviewing, (BEI) and Google can help you.
Ancient Observer is offline  
Old 5th Aug 2008, 14:48
  #8 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Hades.
Posts: 753
Thanks AO,
Just the sort of thing I was after.
Interesting response from the others
You can ask for, and get, huge ammounts of info on how to do the interview and sim to get into a company, but some seem to get very twitched about improving yourself once you are in.
Any more info much appreciated.
HD
helen-damnation is offline  
Old 25th Aug 2010, 02:33
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: other
Age: 36
Posts: 4
Hi,

Thanks very much for this comment. I was actually hired from another interview I had. I'm sure this thread will be useful for others though.
Apart from that, this link below may be useful: HR interview questions
Tks again and pls keep posting.
vegetablevn is offline  
Old 25th Aug 2010, 10:16
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 1,114
Pop into somewhere like WH Smith and grab a book. There are loads of em out there. The better ones have examples of the questions and follow up with and explanation of why the interviewer is asking the question along with a suggested framework to answer the said question.

Expect the usual strengths, weaknesses, tell us about a time of conflict and how you resolved this etc etc.
potkettleblack is offline  
Old 25th Aug 2010, 18:29
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Mars
Posts: 48
I advise anyone preparing for an HR interview to not follow the advice given by those saying you should not prepare for hypothetical questions. In fact, you have to prepare for every possible questions because the goal is to score points with the interviewer. You have to come up with great answers, not good answers, and score more points than other applicants.

If you don't prepare, you might come up with 2 or 3 good points in your answer; on the other hand, if you prepare well you will come up with 5 or 6 good points, and the interviewer(s) will be more impressed by you than by others who just gave "good" answers.

It takes time to prepare for an HR interview, and I strongly advise you pick up a book about pilot interviews for that matter. When reading interview gouges, take not of the questions and discard the answers given by other applicants. They might not apply to you: someone with a lot of experience is expected to come up with a better, more thorough answer than someone with little experience, etc. Prepare your answers well in advance, practice a few mock interviews with someone, go back over your answers and improve them.

There's a lot more to say but all can be found in pilot interview prep books.
CrazyStuntPilot is offline  
Old 27th Aug 2010, 21:55
  #12 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: England
Age: 35
Posts: 363
Hi Helen,

I too was confused by some of the other posters who seem to think that preparing for an interview is in some way cheating?!?

Anyway, my view is that it's best to think of about 5 or 6 little stories from your past of situations / decisions you've been in. Each situation should be an example of various things. For example, one of your stories might cover when you "influenced others", and "leadership" and another story might cover "when you worked effectively as part of a team" and "had to come up with an original solution to a problem".

Obviously, there would be some overlap as some stories would cover some of the same things, but that's good because you may use one of the stories to illustrate one strength and then you won't be able to use that same story again in the interview.

Try to describe succintly: what the situation was, what you did, what the outcome was / relate it to what they are asking about.

Just to get you started here are a few possible questions:

Tell us of a time when:

You have dealt with confrontation
You have worked as part of a team
You have thought "outside the box"
You could have done something better
You made a mistake
You have communicated effectively
You have worked hard to achieve something
You have led a team
You have motivated others
You have thought on your feet
You have worked to a deadline
You have shown empathy for others

Some others:

What are your strengths and weaknesses?
How would your friends describe you?
How to you cope under pressure?
How do you influence others?

Any questions of a negative slant, ie "tell us about when you made a mistake" should be framed in a positive light: ie "so I learnt from that to do things a different way and now I am better for it" sort of thing. It is also probably best if these are not aviation related!

I hope this has been of some help, good luck!
Tiger_ Moth is online now  
Old 30th Aug 2010, 07:08
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Away
Posts: 70
HR Interview


Great Gen! Keep it coming. Can anyone elaborate on interview books? There are literally hundreds of them!
Thanks Zeflo
Zeflo27 is offline  
Old 31st Aug 2010, 21:02
  #14 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: UK
Age: 30
Posts: 94
Stick 'Competency Based Questions' into Google and you'll get a complete run down of exactly what they are and why they are asked along with a whole host of example questions.
gg190 is offline  
Old 1st Sep 2010, 08:43
  #15 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Planet Moo Moo
Posts: 1,220
It is also probably best if these are not aviation related!
Might I suggest, if you are applying for a position at the very start of your aviation career, that your experiences, no matter how fantastic and exciting to you, are not of the required depth to answer most of the tricky HR questions.

These questions are designed to assess lateral thinking and application of associated events to the framework required by the question. As such simple, real life events can be adequately moulded into aceeptable replies by using your noggin. That is what the interviewer wants to see. Be warned though, many interviewers will put you under time pressure to reply.

Not meaning to be degrading but, to be perfectly honest, the interviewer doesn't care a jot about your actual experience, they just want to see you apply a mental model off the cuff.

Good luck.

Edit:

Just re-read the initial question and I assume you are looking for a job as a trainer? In which case be prepared for anything that fits the framework above. With the relevant experience you should (and I, as the interviewer would expect) that you can apply relevant, appropriate situations to each 'give an example of' questions both quickly and concisely.
Wirbelsturm is offline  
Old 29th Sep 2010, 20:07
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: uk
Posts: 6
Thumbs up

Hey Tiger Moth,
great q's thanks will work out a few answers from all the memories! and hopefully they'll help in the future
cheers
lookingup is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.