PPRuNe Forums

PPRuNe Forums (https://www.pprune.org/)
-   Freight Dogs (https://www.pprune.org/freight-dogs-41/)
-   -   Atlas Air Interview Help (https://www.pprune.org/freight-dogs/423595-atlas-air-interview-help.html)

zerozero 4th Sep 2010 01:54

The letter inviting the applicant to the interview says dress should be business casual.

Everyone is reading between the lines that is to mean no tie.

Tie, no tie, who cares? There are bigger fish to fry.

Just be professional.

711-24-7 4th Sep 2010 11:57

So, what is the face to face interview like? After the online tech test do they call or send a letter for face to face interview? Any help or info would be much appriciated!!

Mr.Haole 5th Sep 2010 16:51

So, in anticipation of the phone call with a test to be performed within a 60 minute time-frame, any suggestions (better yet-links) for study material in PDF format?

Thank you kindly in advance.

Aloha,

Haole

711-24-7 6th Sep 2010 03:20

Check your PM Mr. Haole

wolleat 15th Sep 2010 19:54

I dont think the ties are a deal-breaker, but one of the HR dudes did comment about how the tie wearers didn't read the directions. I didnt wear one.

711-24-7 15th Sep 2010 21:20

Has anyone gotten a phone call for the face to face interview in last couple of weeks after taking the tech test??

captseth 15th Sep 2010 22:25

I can't help but think that despite the job being one of the mildly better ones in the current market, that the actual management are the biggest bunch of ****heads I've seen in a long, long time.

Moon-dog 17th Sep 2010 00:36

I got a call about 10 days or so ago.

3pointlanding 14th Oct 2010 13:56

Make sure you show them you can bend over spread the cheeks and take it like a man. The Teamsters will supply the vaseline

FirstStep 14th Oct 2010 21:21

3point....

If by that comment you are inferring that working for Atlas you have to give a "pound of your flesh", work on the back side of the clock until you REALLY don't know what day it is, eat "chicken or beef" so much you'll try the meal that is labeled unreadable( in Chineese), and have a schedule that resembles more of a "wish" list that anything remotely reliable, then YES, that is Atlas.

However, if you want to fly good equipment with great handling charasteristics, fly long-haul, stay at some pretty descent hotels, get to put more "pins" on your map than most pilots, get a pretty good paycheck ( better in relation to many ), with a "growing" airline with opportunities that is FAR from bankruptcy, with some of the best guys around, then YES, that is the Atlas experience as well.

As far as Teamsters, well, we are who we elect. I happen to believe in the guy's who are representing me. Call it Faith, but given enough time and patience ( in short supply around here ), we will get a fair shake.

Oh I could bitch about tons of stuff. Tons. But, what good would it do.
And besides, who would want to listen?.

Fullboat2 14th Oct 2010 21:39

FirstStep, I'm all ears!

Please, give me the good and the bad regarding Atlas. I went through the interview a few weeks ago and haven't heard a thing yet. But from what I've seen and been told by my friends who work there, its a pretty good place to be.

Would appreciate your thoughts!

daknarr 15th Oct 2010 01:59

@Firststep

Me too. I've just sent my third resume to Atlas in a year. Still no word, but I persist

TimeOnTarget 15th Oct 2010 02:26

The good and the bad
 
Life at Atlas is "pretty good". Especially if you compare it to some of the other non-sched operations. As has been pointed out, we make a decent wage, but certainly not what we should.

Pros
Good airplanes with -8s on the way
Many great destinations-Honolulu, Sydney, Melbourne, Hong Kong, Europe, South America, etc
Some really great people in certain parts of management
Gateway travel
Nice hotels
Growth potential and a lot of senior captains to retire in the next few years
Well established military contracts with growth potential
A true adventure/opportunity to see the world

Cons
Long history of hostile management practices against pilot group
The company can be vicious at times
Pay is below par for the job
Constantly changing schedule with no pay protection
Long duty days and high levels of fatigue
17+ day patterns
Lots of sitting in hotels
Hostile training center
Tortuous dead heading up to 24 hours

We just need a fair contract and it will be a great place to be. I hope to have a career here, but who knows in this crazy busniess....

3pointlanding 15th Oct 2010 14:47

I would have written it if I had not experienced it first hand. I now work for a first class outfit. Make more money, work less hours, contract followed (reluctantly but followed), what more is there?

Alchemy 23rd Nov 2010 21:13

Does anyone have any more information on the face to face interview? Are any companies out there offering interview prep geared toward Atlas? I am a bit nervous coming from a domestic only glass cockpit and am concerned about going cold into a 747 classic sim. Do they still do that?

I hear they also require you to write an essay about a technical aviation topic. Does anyone have an idea of topics on should brush up on for that? I try to stay up on aerodynamics, navigation, weather, and aircraft systems as much as the next guy but I fear that being stuck on a single a/c type for the past 6 years might have limited my exposure a bit.

Any advice is appreciated. I'm grateful for the chance to interview even if the result doesn't turn out as I am hoping....Thanks!

TimeOnTarget 24th Nov 2010 03:14

They are not conducting classic sim rides for interviews now.

Glass is good. You can be trained on the international part.

The big thing is whether you really want this job or not. It is going to be quite different from your domestic gig. The face to face is all about seeing what kind of person you are. It was not a stressful situation at all when I went through 3 years ago.

I don't know anything about this new test. Essays are usually more about assessing your communication skills than about the topic itself. :ok:

Alchemy 24th Nov 2010 03:30

Thanks for the encouragement. I definitely want this job! At the risk of sounding phony, it would be a dream come true, even knowing about the potential for being on the road for 20+ days at a time, constant deadheading, and long days. I believe that Atlas has a solid business plan and feel like it would be a great place to spend a career. I'm single, so I'd be willing to move to a base and settle in for the long-haul, in more ways than one. I hear that moving is not necessarily much of an advantage....but I'm putting the cart before the horse a bit anyway. After drudging away at a regional on reserve for so long, it's an incredible morale booster to get an interview like this. Just tonight I had to kick a drunk off the airplane....and believe me I didn't want to do it. Although I'm sure freight presents its own challenges, I am eager to see what it's all about and feel like it might be a perfect fit for my personality type. The appeal of getting rid of passenger/flight attendant drama seems strong. Even if I don't get a job offer, I'll be applying again in the hope that persistence pays off.

maxcackel 25th Nov 2010 20:10

What is the advantage and disadvantage of living in base or gateway city?

TimeOnTarget 26th Nov 2010 17:57

Well, don't forget about pax flying completely as we are already moving in that direction with our new service for Sonair to Angola.

My advice is to wait until you are on the line a year and then think about moving.

If you live at your base, you will not have gateway privileges ever!! That is the way the contract is written. We will see what happens next year with the new language. I have changed bases 5 times in less than 3 years, so don't expect things to stay stable.

Life can be pretty good for guys living in their base particularly when assigned reserve in conjunction with your line. They are forcing us to pull base reserve now which is painful for us commuters. Gateway is a nice thing, but commuting still sucks!!! If you live within an hour or so of your base and can make it in one leg, then that is not too bad. One of the reasons that this job beats you up so much is because you will operate a 9 hour leg to ANC, arrive at midnight local, catch a red eye AS to SEA, then whatever else to get home. Those are simply the facts of life here....

See for yourself, and decide for yourself. Don't get caught up in the hype. :ok:

nitty-gritty 28th Nov 2010 23:40


If you live at your base, you will not have gateway privileges ever!! That is the way the contract is written. We will see what happens next year with the new language. I have changed bases 5 times in less than 3 years, so don't expect things to stay stable.
That is not quite correct. There are conditions that you can, such as:


A Crewmember who currently lives within one hundred and thirty (130) miles of
his base will not be eligible for Gateway Travel if he bids to another base unless:

i. His bid is to upgrade in position and he cannot hold the same upgrade
position at his current base on any aircraft type; or

ii. He is involuntarily displaced from his current base and he elects, seniority
permitting, to bid the same aircraft type at his new base. If the aircraft
type has been eliminated this restriction will not apply


In the end, living at your base is best for time off. All gateway travel is like you commuting except on the compay's dime with a ticket and hotel. Your still spending your time off doing traveling to the initial operating flight. The idea is to bid trips that don't start at your base (not many do) and required travel per the pattern from your base to the initial operating leg. That way you can usually travel on the same day as your awarded pattern instead of on your own day off to start the trip. Works out many times and then sometimes not as far as traveling on your days off.


All times are GMT. The time now is 06:31.


Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.