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FAA Licence Holder in UK

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FAA Licence Holder in UK

Old 25th May 2021, 19:10
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FAA Licence Holder in UK

Evening all

I have a question regarding the CAA statement here

If someone were to operate an aircraft based in mainland UK but registered in Guernsey (2-Reg), using an FAA standalone PPL, would they need to follow the process stated by the CAA even though they're not flying a G or N registered aircraft? Or could they continue to operate on the FAA licence?

A little confused or maybe just overthinking it.

Cheers all
360BakTrak is offline  
Old 26th May 2021, 06:44
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FAA privileges

FAA certificate is good for:
  1. Fly anything in the US
  2. Fly N anywhere

If youíre not in either of these categories, you need to comply with local rules, either of registry (Guernsey validation of FAA certificate), or location.

Good luck.
awair is offline  
Old 26th May 2021, 07:16
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awair

FAA cert no longer simple if permanently resident in the UK. If you click on the OP's link you'll know why.
MrAverage is offline  
Old 26th May 2021, 18:19
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ICAO Annex 1
1.2.2.2 Recommendation.ó A pilot licence issued by a
Contracting State should be rendered valid by other
Contracting States for use in private flights.
The UK complies with this recomendation in respect of Non Part 21 aircraft and validaes ICAO licences in accordance with the ANO Article 150.

What safety reason is there for complying with a recomendation in respect of one group of aircraft whilst ignoring it for Part 21 aircraft?
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Old 26th May 2021, 22:24
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So if you are flying an aircraft owner (private operations) but are paid for this (commercial activity), you need a validation or Part-FCL licence to legally fly.

That is taken from the CAA website, and the whole thing seems extremely confusing. I hold an FAA ATP certificate (multi-engine land). Is this saying that if the owner of an N reg aircraft wants to pay me to fly him in his aircraft I first have to have a validation of my FAA certificate by the CAA, or a need a CAA issued licence. Does that therefore imply that I could be paid for pilot services flying an N reg aircraft under IFR if I didnít hold an FAA licence, but only a U.K. licence. But then I get even more confused. I also hold a U.K. issued ATPL with a valid MEP rating. Do I still have to do some sort of oral exam (and pay the CAA fees) to prove my knowledge of U.K. procedures before I can exercise the privileges of my FAA certificate in an N reg aircraft despite the fact that I have in the past proved that knowledge for the issue of my U.K. PPL, CPL, and eventually ATPL (three sets of exams covering U.K. air law etc). My FAA ATP is a full license issued in the US, not a piggy back on my U.K. licence.

Once upon a time the holder of an ICAO licence could automatically exercise VFR privileges in a G reg aircraft. Why did that have to be changed ?

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Old 27th May 2021, 09:06
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To fly an N reg. aircraft anywhere in the world then it must be by reference to the USA FAA regulation. I believe however that the aircraft used commercially must be recorded with the FAA as being used as such. If you are only acting as the paid pilot for the aircraft owner then the owner remains the operator.. This is considered a private flight but the pilot must have a commercial licence if payed. If the pilot is an 'employee and the main role is not to act as a pilot then the pilot does not have to hold more than a PPL. For private purposes the FAA permit the holder of a licence issued in the same state of the airspace, in which the flight is taking place, to fly the aeroplane.

The CAA does not have oversight for FAA registered aircraft. You are only required to apply/register with the CAA / Dept. of Transport if you wish to use an FAA licence to fly a UK registered aeroplane. If you already hold an appropriate UK licence then you will use that to fly and so the FAA licence is not an issue.

I agree with whopity that the stupid rules requiring 100 hours for PPL use is unnecessary but is left over from the bizarre EASA regulation borne from anti American thinking. There is no safety argument to require this. Hopefully the UK CAA will eventually correct this.


Last edited by Fl1ingfrog; 27th May 2021 at 09:21.
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Old 27th May 2021, 09:12
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Originally Posted by Fl1ingfrog View Post
To fly an N reg. aircraft anywhere in the world then it must be by reference to the USA FAA regulation. I believe that the aircraft used commercially must be recorded with the FAA as being used as such. If you are only acting as the paid pilot for the aircraft owner then the owner remains the operator.. This is considered a private flight but the pilot must have a commercial licence if payed. The CAA does not have oversight for FAA registered aircraft.

You are only required to apply/register with the CAA / Dept. of Transport if you wish to use an FAA licence to fly a UK registered aeroplane. If you already hold an appropriate UK licence then you will use that to fly and so the FAA licence is not an issue.

I agree with whopity that the stupid rules requiring 100 hours for PPL use is unnecessary but left over from the bizarre EASA regulation anti American thinking. There is no safety argument to require this.
So, as you understand it, the CAA are stating it applies to 'G' registered aircraft and '2' are not affected if using an FAA licence?

Thnaks for all input so far.
360BakTrak is offline  
Old 27th May 2021, 18:56
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No, it applies to flying ANY aircraft in UK airspace!
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Old 10th Jun 2021, 18:44
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Not convinced

Not sure, I think G reg you need a validation, N Reg it's a grey area but if you have a FAA licence would be difficult to see how it can be wrong!
Other wise EASA Licence will eventually go same way???????????
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Old 10th Jun 2021, 20:55
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The new rule essentially states (as I understand it) that an ICAO license can no longer be used for flying the G reg day VFR for leisure as before, so yes that affects EASA licenses. Only EASA licenses issued before brexit have access to the two year validation. So it does stand a post 31/12/2020 issued EASA license holder wishing to do day vfr lisure flying in the UK will require a UK Part FCL for flying after the 20th June.

FAA holders residing in the UK have an exemption until the 21st December.

Last edited by portsharbourflyer; 10th Jun 2021 at 22:52.
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