Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Aircrew Forums > Flying Instructors & Examiners
Reload this Page >

All the attributes of a good flight instructor

Flying Instructors & Examiners A place for instructors to communicate with one another because some of them get a bit tired of the attitude that instructing is the lowest form of aviation, as seems to prevail on some of the other forums!

All the attributes of a good flight instructor

Old 30th Sep 2020, 18:42
  #21 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: UK
Posts: 3
Explosion of instructors

As a career FI myself, I agree with most points made above.

Although I do appreciate the current extraordinary times we live in and also that not every airline pilot to be makes a bad instructor, but I really wonder whether the characteristics raised above are going to be as prevalent as we'd like them to be in the current "pandemic" or "explosion" of new instructors that one second ago where on their way to get their Ryanair seat, but all of a sudden find themselves somewhere paying 4000 euro for a cheap FI course and filling our flight schools while they build the hours.....
Fleyer is offline  
Old 1st Oct 2020, 18:37
  #22 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Augusta, Georgia, USA (back from Germany again)
Posts: 180
Originally Posted by Ascend Charlie View Post
...shows ya how the US system of going instructing immediately after getting a licence, no experience necessary, leaves the instructor a little under-prepared to teach?
The US Navy and the US Air Force both retain a portion of new pilots with 250 hours to stay as flight instructors. Seems to work for them.

If 250 hours is enough to be in the right seat of a 737 or an A320, why wouldn't it be enough for the right seat in a C172?

That may even be more real world experience gained in 250 hours than a multi-crew trainee has received in 140 hours in a simulator where no matter how bad the decision one makes, the worst that happens is getting chewed out and rebooting the computer.

A new instructor might just 1) still remember what it's like to be new, 2) be up-to-date on current regulations/technology, and 3) not yet be jaded/bored/just waiting for the last few hours before the first airline application...

Important - being able to watch what the "learner" (the FAA's new word) is doing and provide measured feedback. Important - allowing learning to take place w/o constantly taking over when unnecessary. Important - positive attitude and an ability to find something every flight worth praising. Important - knowing if something is a pattern/trend or just one off.
LTCTerry is offline  
Old 1st Oct 2020, 18:41
  #23 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Augusta, Georgia, USA (back from Germany again)
Posts: 180
Excellent

Originally Posted by Big Pistons Forever View Post
My 02 cents after holding a valid Instructor rating for 36 years.

1) You have to like teaching....

4) Good instructors demand high standards. Students will be as good as you demand of them.
I agree with all five of BPF's points above. I've selected two to keep in the quote. Well done, Sir!
LTCTerry is offline  
Old 2nd Oct 2020, 14:39
  #24 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Uk
Posts: 120
Yes big pistons is on it I reckon.

I’m one of those airline types who used to instruct a long time back.

I have toyed with the idea of renewing it but financially I think it would be 3k ish to get SEP and FI back and if I am doing it to fly something again, that money buys a fair bit of hire time, without sitting around all day at airfields waiting for the fog to clear
Meester proach is offline  
Old 3rd Oct 2020, 17:26
  #25 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: West Coast Canada
Posts: 3,827
Originally Posted by LTCTerry View Post
The US Navy and the US Air Force both retain a portion of new pilots with 250 hours to stay as flight instructors. Seems to work for them.

If 250 hours is enough to be in the right seat of a 737 or an A320, why wouldn't it be enough for the right seat in a C172?

That may even be more real world experience gained in 250 hours than a multi-crew trainee has received in 140 hours in a simulator where no matter how bad the decision one makes, the worst that happens is getting chewed out and rebooting the computer.

A new instructor might just 1) still remember what it's like to be new, 2) be up-to-date on current regulations/technology, and 3) not yet be jaded/bored/just waiting for the last few hours before the first airline application...

Important - being able to watch what the "learner" (the FAA's new word) is doing and provide measured feedback. Important - allowing learning to take place w/o constantly taking over when unnecessary. Important - positive attitude and an ability to find something every flight worth praising. Important - knowing if something is a pattern/trend or just one off.
Low time instructors are not inherently bad, but they absolutely must have significant and constant mentorship during their early days of instructing. Low time military instructors work inside a very robust system with a standards office to help. They also get students preselected for aptitude and drive, not just anyone who walks in the door, so not a good comparison IMHO

Unfortunately most new instructors have to figure things out for themselves as Head of Training oversight is often benign neglect at best or just abusive at worst.
Big Pistons Forever is offline  
Old 4th Oct 2020, 05:15
  #26 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Fragrant Harbour
Posts: 4,738
The emphasis on the RAF CFS style of instruction is to create a good learning environment. Of course, much of this is taken away from the 'coal face' instructor and is in the hands of the management of the training organisation. But the instructor has to transfer this to the cockpit. Much of the good instruction I have seen was done in an environment conducive to effective learning; and conversely most of the bad instruction was conveyed in a toxic environment.
Dan Winterland is offline  
Old 4th Oct 2020, 11:25
  #27 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: West Britain
Age: 70
Posts: 187
It's also vital to remember that no two students are the same. An experienced instructor will tailor his/her approach to the individual. Easy to say but also quite easy to forget on lesson six on a long summer day!
For what it's worth, I still think that teaching people to fly is the most rewarding aspect of aviation - albeit not financially.
BristolScout is offline  
Old 10th Oct 2020, 18:42
  #28 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Augusta, Georgia, USA (back from Germany again)
Posts: 180
Originally Posted by Big Pistons Forever View Post

Unfortunately most new instructors have to figure things out for themselves as Head of Training oversight is often benign neglect at best or just abusive at worst.
I suspect that is absolutely correct! Sadly.
LTCTerry is offline  
Old 11th Oct 2020, 09:05
  #29 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Under the stairs
Posts: 15
A good sense of humour!
Aneas is offline  
Old 11th Oct 2020, 16:37
  #30 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Bressuire
Posts: 279
Prior to EASA we had the FI and AFI structure. An AFI could not operate unless an FI was present. The AFI was retested every 12 months and the FI bi-annually. The AFI was subject to a test to upgrade to FI. There was a much clearer distinction established between the two with the FI having a defined oversight role. The new EASA FI is only subject to "supervision" which undefined and as often as not is in name only. It is now without a structure and a FI (restricted) can become unrestricted within a few months of completing their course anyway. The young FI (restricted), with the natural arrogance of youth, will as often as not, give even the much more experienced FI short shift if they seek to advise. The CFI is all but gone in some clubs and superseded by the HOT who is not required to be present, not be full time nor be a current Flight Instructor.

We all have our own ideas about what makes a good instructor. For me a good instructor is one who teaches clearly and always teaches the complete syllabus. Their students learn to achieve both a safe and a good standard. Bad instruction is rushing the student through the basics and doing much of the teaching in the circuit. Deciding arbitrarily to miss out elements of the syllabus that they don't think is necessary or understand: glide approaches as a skill (not a demonstration), low approach go arounds, aborted take-off and proper instrument skills per the syllabus beyond a 180 turn in level flight. The list can go on.

Who cares whether the instructor is a grumpy old shit or a laugh a minute, I don't. If I learn from the trip I'm happy but if I do not I'm very unhappy.
Fl1ingfrog is offline  
Old 18th Oct 2020, 15:58
  #31 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Location: Athens
Posts: 8
A good sense of humour I always found helped a lot.
God_of_Fire is offline  
Old 23rd Oct 2020, 22:15
  #32 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: uk
Posts: 521
Empathy, and has already been said, a sense of humour.
olster is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.