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EASA CRI --> FAA CFI

Old 10th Oct 2018, 07:39
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EASA CRI --> FAA CFI

I'm just contemplating doing a standalone FAA CPL/IR, on the USA for reasons that make good sense to me. I think I have a good handle on test standards, training requirements, visa, etc.

Whilst at it, I have noticed that the US schools I'm looking at all offer CFI as well. I'm an EASA CRI with a few hundred instructing hours and two successful renewals - so starting to get a handle on this instructing malarky.

Does anybody know if somebody in my position can get any dispensation against the FAA training requirements for CFI? I can't seem to find an answer (including anything clearly saying that there are no allowances - basically there seems a vacuum of advice.)

G
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Old 10th Oct 2018, 10:53
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The requirement is to cover the areas of operation in 14 CFR 61.187(b) with, and to the satisfaction of, an "authorized instructor" and such a person must make a formal recommendation for a practical test. An "authorized instructor" includes non-US-certificated flight instructors, when flight training is given outside the US, but only for flight training towards a US pilot certificate or rating. See 14 CFR 61.41. This isn't a showstopper because no minimum flight training time is prescribed for the US flight instructor certificate.
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Old 10th Oct 2018, 11:09
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Thanks Selfin - as I've clearly no desire to cut corners on standards, that suggests that what I need is a school prepared to provide "training as required" rather than simply deliver their standard syllabus as if I had no relevant experience.

And actually, any school prepared to at least have a meaningful discussion about that, is probably amongst the better ones anyhow.

G
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Old 13th Oct 2018, 21:18
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Originally Posted by Genghis the Engineer
Thanks Selfin - as I've clearly no desire to cut corners on standards, that suggests that what I need is a school prepared to provide "training as required" rather than simply deliver their standard syllabus as if I had no relevant experience.

And actually, any school prepared to at least have a meaningful discussion about that, is probably amongst the better ones anyhow.

G
Genghis, happy to help with your FAA training. Give me a call.

ifitaint...
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Old 14th Oct 2018, 17:57
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Originally Posted by ifitaintboeing
Genghis, happy to help with your FAA training. Give me a call.

ifitaint...
Cheers, I've dropped you an email.

G
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Old 15th Oct 2018, 19:12
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GtE - there are lots of great references available online.

The FAA is very flexible about training. Instrument training overseas counts towards training for FAA certificates/ratings.

FAR part 61.129 has a detailed list of aeronautical experience required for the commercial. Take a look at that. There is minimum experience required, and a list of maneuvers to be flown, but no minimum instructional time. Ditto for the CFI (In this case "certificated flight instructor, not Chief Flight Instructor...)

My suggestions would be:

Review the requirements for the instrument rating and commercial certificate. Make a matrix. Identify what you have done already. Mark this for easy reference later as you will have to show this to the examiner.

Start with the instrument training. The rating is required for a non-restricted commercial certificate. This will help get you acclimated to flying in the US. You probably just need a bit of "Americanization" which you can get through the required "three hours of flight instruction in the previous 60 days" to recommend you for the checkride. Then for commercial and instructor do the training from the right seat for both. The CFI checkride is essentially a commercial checkride with explanation/instruction from the right seat. You can find examiners who will let you do this. Well known author/CFI Arlyn McMahon (spelling?) has a detailed syllabus for this free online.

You can get a piggyback FAA private certificate if you don't already have one. With a written test you can add on IFR based on an EASA IR rating. I don't think it quite counts towards the Commercial though, so research but don't waste money.

You can probably do this relatively quickly at a reputable school. I suspect there are visa requirements, but that's just an administrative process/expense.

If you start via the "on the basis of" private, you can end up with a fully independent instrument rating and commercial/CFI certificates. Only one written test each.

If you want a "reach goal" consider the single engine ATP...

Not the SE ATP, but I'm in the midst of commercial and CFI training myself. Ifitaint has offered help, but feel free to ask me questions too.

Terry
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Old 16th Oct 2018, 11:14
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Some very useful advice there, thanks Terry. (And from 2-way with IfitItAint.)

That matrix sounds an excellent idea - I'll do that: I've got the 61.75 "piggyback" licence (paperwork in the system somewhere at the moment for re-issue, because everybody's is right now) and am reasonably used to flying in the USA - at the same time, there's much that's done differently there so some further acclimatisation can only be valuable.

My perfect end point is to have CPL/IR/(C)FI both sides of the Atlantic - it all looks doable this way. The bizarre thing is that whilst I've had a really helpful response from IfitAint - I've contacted four schools in the USA so far: one has actually bothered to respond and they seem unable to actually come up with any kind of plan and costs. Who knows, IfitAint may be my new best friend.

I've an IR(R) and 50+hrs PiC IFR, so it makes greatest sense to me to do the FAA IR, then I can do the EASA IR skill test without the writtens Not that I can't pass exams - but I just really hate studying for them. I'd rather do something more flying intensive. Similarly with CRI and a few hundred hours of instructing, EASA CRI -->FAA CFI-->EASA FI is surreally almost certainly quicker and cheaper than EASA CRI --> EASA FI.

ATP? Nah - nice to have, I'd never use it enough to justify the cost and effort. Ultimately, I earn my living mainly as a boffin, not mainly as a pilot - flying aeroplanes that big and complex is for people who *only* fly aeroplanes that big and complex, not do all the other stuff I cram into my existence.

G
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Old 17th Oct 2018, 08:24
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Who knows, IfitAint may be my new best friend
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