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Old 5th Nov 2018, 12:14
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Irish joke

Originally Posted by tux View Post

Any LAME’s here considering converting their licence from U.K. CAA to Irish IAA or similar incase of no deal Brexit?

It seems a popular transfer with pilots, how about engineers?

Discuss...
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Old 7th Nov 2018, 10:30
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Originally Posted by Rigga View Post
Don't forget that, before JAR/EASA 66 came to power, the internationally appreciated CAA BCAR A,C,E,X,I & R almost ruled the world.
Hmmm.......I'm not sure that those with FAA licences would agree with "almost ruled", especially those in the good ole USofA.. But it's true that a BCAR heritage can be seen in many countries' airworthiness regulations. Was/is BCAR personal licensing so wonderful? No, on the whole. Over-complex and unaffordable, IMHO.

By the way, Kuchan; here is some CAA advice;

If you wish to continue to release EU-registered aircraft to service you would need to transfer your licence to the National Aviation Authority of another EASA member state before exit day. You are advised to have a discussion with the relevant NAA as soon as possible about their process and timetable for transfers.
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Old 7th Nov 2018, 17:39
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" I have heard old skool BCARs tell me they blagged shite. And got away with it. Time will tell what happens and we will find out were we are with out people's bullshit and views of the past will be the same as the furture. "

With all due respect Albert, I feel some of those who made this boast may have been just a shade prone to exaggeration shall we say.

Did mine many years ago under the BCAR regs and I can assure you, that, trying to blag your way through a decidedly detailed interview with questions selected at random, plus more in depth questions about any errors made on the written paper would not have gone well to put it mildly. True, there are plenty of anecdotal tales of CAA Surveyors and their own "pet areas "......I had the misfortune to meet one who was obsessed with aerodynamics for example, but, with hindsight, he was genuinely interested to learn from his questions how much I really knew.
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Old 8th Nov 2018, 17:10
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Originally Posted by Krystal n chips View Post
" I have heard old skool BCARs tell me they blagged shite. And got away with it. Time will tell what happens and we will find out were we are with out people's bullshit and views of the past will be the same as the furture. "

With all due respect Albert, I feel some of those who made this boast may have been just a shade prone to exaggeration shall we say.

Did mine many years ago under the BCAR regs and I can assure you, that, trying to blag your way through a decidedly detailed interview with questions selected at random, plus more in depth questions about any errors made on the written paper would not have gone well to put it mildly. True, there are plenty of anecdotal tales of CAA Surveyors and their own "pet areas "......I had the misfortune to meet one who was obsessed with aerodynamics for example, but, with hindsight, he was genuinely interested to learn from his questions how much I really knew.
I know that Alber doesn't have a BCAR Section L and I doubt he has spent a week going through all the BCARS studying how they work for his view of them.
My 1st BCAR oral exam lasted 4 hours, sitting in a bare cellar room of the long-gone Heathrow CAA office. My second interview was quite a bit shorter and my third was 20 minutes including a coffee. "Bullsh!t" was quickly dismissed - as was the person trying it on!

Yes, ONB, the FAA has its role in the world too, hence the word 'almost' appeared in the sentence
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Old 8th Nov 2018, 23:42
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Originally Posted by Rigga View Post
I know that Alber doesn't have a BCAR Section L and I doubt he has spent a week going through all the BCARS studying how they work for his view of them.
My 1st BCAR oral exam lasted 4 hours, sitting in a bare cellar room of the long-gone Heathrow CAA office. My second interview was quite a bit shorter and my third was 20 minutes including a coffee. "Bullsh!t" was quickly dismissed - as was the person trying it on!

Yes, ONB, the FAA has its role in the world too, hence the word 'almost' appeared in the sentence
Rigga, I know where they are and how to read them. My EASA module 10 was read the basic Regulations from Part M downwards plus the ANO and BCARs on the CAA website.Had to covered the lot as I had an exam that was as random as the CAA Part 66 one was you would get at Gatwick. I never took the BCAR L route as it was dead before I started in the industry, it was dead before I took my first civilain exam! That was over 12 years ago. I was reading air ledge for a lot longer that a week, try 2 months every evening after I got back from work.. All my PART 66 was self learned. Not one minute in the classroom.

Last edited by Alber Ratman; 9th Nov 2018 at 14:37.
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Old 9th Nov 2018, 06:15
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Originally Posted by Rigga View Post
I know that Alber doesn't have a BCAR Section L and I doubt he has spent a week going through all the BCARS studying how they work for his view of them.
My 1st BCAR oral exam lasted 4 hours, sitting in a bare cellar room of the long-gone Heathrow CAA office. My second interview was quite a bit shorter and my third was 20 minutes including a coffee. "Bullsh!t" was quickly dismissed - as was the person trying it on!

Yes, ONB, the FAA has its role in the world too, hence the word 'almost' appeared in the sentence
With hindsight, I think that was a UK wide policy, official or otherwise, regarding the initial issue of a Licence in that the Surveyor needed to establish your depth of knowledge and credibility. Thereafter, as you say, those delightful little meetings became progressively shorter.
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Old 9th Nov 2018, 10:01
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Originally Posted by Krystal n chips View Post
With hindsight, I think that was a UK wide policy, official or otherwise, regarding the initial issue of a Licence in that the Surveyor needed to establish your depth of knowledge and credibility. Thereafter, as you say, those delightful little meetings became progressively shorter.
We will see if the old ways are brought back in. However as people joke on here, people in the real world are transfering their licences or companies are preparing to transfer their staff onto other NAA tickets to allow them to work on their non G aircraft. Even guys whom voted for BREXIT I know are doing the same. Only the end of the next few weeks will see what the actual lay of the future will be.
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Old 15th Nov 2018, 20:59
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Transferring to another NAA works in the short term , but only for 2 years , after that who knows ?
I worked damn hard for my license and having seen how some European EASA licenses are viewed in some parts of the world , I am not about o convert it until I know ALL the consequences !
How easy will it be to get a CAA license after the 2 year period if you converted ?
What will happen on 01 Apr 2019 if any aircraft needs a CRS and the only engineer is UK licensed ?
These and many more questions will be answered at some point , not sure when though !
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Old 16th Nov 2018, 12:38
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I had the unfortunate error of having my Section L oral in the afternoon, someone I knew had his in the morning and the surveyor afterwards unbeknown to me picked his brains about the types I was doing and asked me those questions in the afternoon.

I worked on the principal that they only have so long to ask you questions so went for a simple engine type, airframe type and and my A and C together, that way when he was questioning me my logic dictated he would have to work his A and C questions to my type specific ratings, which he did. So I got my licences with type ratings on from day one, though had to study 4 subjects at once.
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Old 17th Nov 2018, 18:35
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Originally Posted by TinyTim2 View Post
Transferring to another NAA works in the short term , but only for 2 years , after that who knows ?
I worked damn hard for my license and having seen how some European EASA licenses are viewed in some parts of the world , I am not about o convert it until I know ALL the consequences !
How easy will it be to get a CAA license after the 2 year period if you converted ?
What will happen on 01 Apr 2019 if any aircraft needs a CRS and the only engineer is UK licensed ?
These and many more questions will be answered at some point , not sure when though !
The way I read the CAA memo issued on 24thSeptember, it looks like a UK CAA Licence will be about as much use as a chocolate fireguard. Except of course if you only work on G reg aircraft. Fair enough, the vast majority of the UK certifiers will be ok. However, those handling EU reg aircraft will need an EASA Licence, not after two years but on 29th March 2019.
What fun.
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Old 17th Nov 2018, 21:09
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In which case there will need to be an agreement in place, or air travel will just about cease overnight, in which case I think it will be rectified if not before, definately shortly afterwards.
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Old 17th Nov 2018, 22:28
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Originally Posted by NutLoose View Post
In which case there will need to be an agreement in place, or air travel will just about cease overnight, in which case I think it will be rectified if not before, definately shortly afterwards.
It will be sorted, because as you say, both sides will suffer. But you can bet our equal standing will no longer exist in regards to the rights, certainly of British companies operating European to European routes. Bring on the hard Brexit I say. Let us see Democracy AKA Mob thinking damage the economy of this country big time. Let the lesson be learned the hard way.
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Old 18th Nov 2018, 00:03
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Originally Posted by TURIN View Post
The way I read the CAA memo issued on 24thSeptember, it looks like a UK CAA Licence will be about as much use as a chocolate fireguard. Except of course if you only work on G reg aircraft. Fair enough, the vast majority of the UK certifiers will be ok. However, those handling EU reg aircraft will need an EASA Licence, not after two years but on 29th March 2019.
What fun.
I think there must be a lot of UK Engineers/Pilots heading down the transfer to another EASA State route. I am currently going down the route of obtaining a non-EASA licence from my employers NAA as they accepted that after March I may have a licence that is, well, useless. As part of the process I must obtain from the CAA a Licence Verification letter. On the form it states 10 working to days to process the request, which has now been with the CAA for about 14 working days, so I gave them a call to make sure they had received it . The lady who answered my call explained that applications for most things are currently taking around 26 working days and they are putting on overtime to cope with the level of work they are having to deal with. The last time I applied to them for anything (change of address or additional type), it was as I recall pretty much issued as the timescale stated on the application. I'm not sure what I'm going to do with my UK Licence as yet and am waiting until December's political outcomes to decide to try and maybe transfer to Eire.....but at least thanks to my employer I will have some form of licence even if it is non-EASA.

Also, during my discussions with QA about my licence, the company are having to look at their maintenance provisions in a few places around Europe where we handled by UK operators come April as their EASA Pt145 approval could be null and void. They will have to make the decisions soon due to SGHA notice period clauses (and maybe before the hard/soft exit questions have been answered) to ensure continuity of cover, which I guess will see UK companies potentially losing revenue and job loses happening at stations as contracts are moved over to EASA approval holders that are still going to be (confirmed) part of EASA come April.

Now isn't the time for the assumption that all will be OK and a resolution will be found to ensure operations continue.....the realities are happening now and plans are being made.

Last edited by Tom Sawyer; 18th Nov 2018 at 07:14.
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Old 18th Nov 2018, 17:56
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To clarify why (I think) there won't be a cliff-edge for aviation...

1. EASA AML Cancellations: As you all say, there's too many of us GB mob all about the EU to do without, suddenly.
2. Forms 1 becoming invalid:
far too expensive for all airlines to suffer re-cert costs...
Airbus will suffer wing production costs
RR costs will also go up
Dowty, etc, etc.
3. Closure of airports to UK traffic: All North Atlantic routes for the EU are controlled by UK ATC..!
4. Most part 21 design orgs are in the UK for interiors, repairs, mods etc....
5. too many EASA employees are UK based persons...

I have confidence, however seemingly misplaced, that a fudge will be found...we can only wait and see.
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