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Human Factors Hangar Ambient Climate query

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Human Factors Hangar Ambient Climate query

Old 10th Aug 2017, 20:21
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Human Factors Hangar Ambient Climate query

I have been trying to search in EASA website and internet in general if there is any guide or instructions in human factors regarding what will be the max ambient temperature that is healthwise safe to work in a hangar?
Anyone knows where can I find some info?
Will appreciate help as this is a serious issue.
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Old 10th Aug 2017, 21:01
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Originally Posted by navygm View Post
I have been trying to search in EASA website and internet in general if there is any guide or instructions in human factors regarding what will be the max ambient temperature that is healthwise safe to work in a hangar?
Anyone knows where can I find some info?
Will appreciate help as this is a serious issue.
Cap 716 chapter 5 available in PDF via google
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Old 10th Aug 2017, 21:51
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Not EASA, not hangar-specific, but maybe useful anyway? BTW, it appears that there are no definite temperature limits for the work environment.

https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/browse/...44/3/_contents
https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docket/rev...Rev-120913.pdf
http://web.williams.edu/Economics/wp...HeatStress.pdf
https://www.wshc.sg/files/wshc/uploa...ision_2012.pdf
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Old 11th Aug 2017, 16:54
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Appreciate your replies... I am going through the shared documents but seems there is no such rule of a temperature where should you stop your work! in hot environment

If there's anyone else with more info would be great whilst thanking you in advance
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Old 14th Aug 2017, 04:40
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In the US, OSHA regulations cover work conditions.

https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatstress/
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Old 14th Aug 2017, 11:03
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This question makes me smile - as a line engineer a hangar is a luxury I rarely had. Highest ambient worked - +49deg Lowest temp - 15deg. Both times were engine changes.
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Old 14th Aug 2017, 16:50
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Im a base engineer and its true that sometimes you have to work in these conditiins, but lets face it, human factor wise working for the whole summer in high temp and humidity is not healthy.
Everyone will have lack of energy plus lack of motivation!
Its a pity there is no regulation in europe..
I was reading that in some US states and Australia there are temperature thresholds!

Originally Posted by bcgallacher View Post
This question makes me smile - as a line engineer a hangar is a luxury I rarely had. Highest ambient worked - +49deg Lowest temp - 15deg. Both times were engine changes.
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Old 15th Aug 2017, 18:27
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FWIW there are legal limits in the Middle East. In the UAE the Law states that all work outside of climate controlled areas must stop if the temperature gets over 50c.

Of course the Law didnt apply if you worked on the airport...
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Old 20th Aug 2017, 17:50
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in the UK and most of Europe AFAIK, there's no need for EASA Regulations, because other regulations will be in force, eg Factories Act in the UK, Health & Safety Regulations etc. Aircraft hangars are not exempt; why should they be? Just like the USA. as riff_raff pointed put.

(CAP 716 Chapter 5 is not much help; just some vague generalities that a good working environment is a good idea.)
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Old 22nd Aug 2017, 09:37
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Long time lurker here, thought I'd sign up to help answer this.
I've been involved in the past of helping to set up maintenance facilities but nothing on the scale as large as a hangar.

The EASA regulations relating to maintenance facilities can be found in Acceptable Means of Compliance AMC/GM to Part 145 under facility requirements. (AMC 145.A.25) available here https://www.easa.europa.eu/system/fi...art-145%29.pdf

It states "Protection from the weather elements relates to the normal prevailing local weather elements that are expected throughout any twelve month period. Aircraft hangar and component workshop structures should prevent the ingress of rain, hail, ice, snow, wind and dust etc. Aircraft hangar and component workshop floors should be sealed to minimise dust generation."

Nowhere does it mention a minimum or maximum ambient temperature for the work environment, however it does state that serviceable component storage facilities should be kept at a constant dry temperature to minimise the effects of condensation.

As others have mentioned there should be something in the local regs regarding general working conditions.

I hope this helps
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Old 23rd Aug 2017, 14:00
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Originally Posted by navygm View Post
I have been trying to search in EASA website and internet in general if there is any guide or instructions in human factors regarding what will be the max ambient temperature that is healthwise safe to work in a hangar?
Anyone knows where can I find some info?
Will appreciate help as this is a serious issue.

By the definition of HF, it's a case of recognising that the working conditions will have an affect on performance and mitigating error.


Therefore you will struggle to find a value. One persons comfortable is another persons sweatbox.
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 10:18
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I was interested enough in the question to look up the UK Factories Act 1961 to see what it had to say; this gets quite complicated with a mass of repeals, amendments, Statutory Instruments etc etc.

In the end I found FAQs on the H&SE website; their answer to the question "is there a min/max temperature?" is - for the interest of UK readers only - as follows;

The law does not state a minimum or maximum temperature, but the temperature in workrooms should normally be at least:

16C or 13C if much of the work involves rigorous physical effort.

A meaningful maximum figure cannot be given due to the high temperatures found in, for example, glass works or foundries. In such environments it is still possible to work safely provided appropriate controls are present. Factors other than air temperature, ie radiant temperature, humidity and air velocity, become more significant and the interaction between them become more complex with rising temperatures.

The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 lay down particular requirements for most aspects of the working environment. Regulation 7 deals specifically with the temperature in indoor workplaces and states that:

‘During working hours, the temperature in all workplaces inside buildings shall be reasonable.’

However, the application of the regulation depends on the nature of the workplace, such as a bakery, a cold store, an office, a warehouse.

These Regulations only apply to employees – they do not apply to members of the public, for example, with regard temperature complaints from customers in a shopping centre or cinema.
I then thought; "what about the EU?" Back to Google, and to EU Directive 89/391/EEC. On looking that up, I became embroiled in the same dreadful, incomprehensible, convoluted system of EU regulatory documentation that we are so familiar with from EASA. So I gave up; if you want to follow it up here's the link.

Good luck with that.

Last edited by Capot; 24th Aug 2017 at 10:32.
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