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Light Biz Jets - How Common Are Single Pilot Ops?

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Light Biz Jets - How Common Are Single Pilot Ops?

Old 14th Sep 2022, 12:19
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Light Biz Jets - How Common Are Single Pilot Ops?

Hello,

A lot of modern light business jets (e.g. Phenom 100/300, Beech Premier, Mustang) have the capabilities for single pilot operations, but I was just wondering how often this actually happens in executive charter companies?

I'm coming at this from the perspective of an enthusiast but not a pilot, so I'm a bit ignorant on the subject, but it just seems like it would be a lot of work for the control to be given to just a single pilot.

Thanks
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Old 15th Sep 2022, 06:58
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Under EASA rules, for private flights a single pilot is OK but for Commercial Air Transport you must have two pilots in any turbine-engine aircraft. Those were the rules a couple of years ago anyway. Someone with more up-to-date experience may correct me.
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Old 15th Sep 2022, 09:39
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...especially in light of the tragic "ghost-flight" of that Citation Jet a few days ago - it seemed to have been operated single pilot. Legal, yes. Smart, who knows?
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Old 15th Sep 2022, 13:18
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Wasn´t his daughter a) on board and b) a pilot as well ?

The question really is, how smart is it to fly SP without regular sim training - and maybe an understanding of hypoxia, best based on the real deal (alt chamber or the like)

FSI once offered training (not in the chamber but with a mask and then less and less O2) and we did it. Its really interesting to see how different the individual reactions are...
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Old 15th Sep 2022, 17:13
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In case anybody does training with CAE in Dallas, there is a pressure chamber in a hospital in Dallas. We arranged training in it via CAE many years ago. No idea if it´s still available. The experience was quite an eye opener.

Imho, don´t fly a high perf aircraft single crew.
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Old 23rd Sep 2022, 16:36
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Quite often the person chartering the aircraft or if a company aircraft then the company owning the aircraft will insist on two crew as, in most cases, the pax are VIP in one form or another. Also quite probable that the insurance premium will be less for two crew than for single crew.
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Old 23rd Sep 2022, 20:37
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Originally Posted by His dudeness View Post
Wasn´t his daughter a) on board and b) a pilot as well ?

The question really is, how smart is it to fly SP without regular sim training - and maybe an understanding of hypoxia, best based on the real deal (alt chamber or the like)

FSI once offered training (not in the chamber but with a mask and then less and less O2) and we did it. Its really interesting to see how different the individual reactions are...
I would love to experience this in a controlled environment once, sadly it's not been offered to me so far haha
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Old 23rd Sep 2022, 21:53
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#4,How can you simulate `hypoxia` unless you go into a chamber ,and get depressurised..? in a controlled environment..
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Old 24th Sep 2022, 01:07
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You don't need a chamber, training can be given by simply wearing a mask and controlling the O2 partial pressure. There are companies that provide such training, basics here,

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full...9.2020.1842514
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Old 24th Sep 2022, 02:23
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The FAA usually offers it for free at Sun & Fun. It's really interesting
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Old 24th Sep 2022, 09:58
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"How can you simulate `hypoxia`"

Not generally the best source, but good enough in this case:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypoxia_(medical):


Generalized hypoxia occurs in healthy people when they ascend to high altitude, where it causes altitude sicknessleading to potentially fatal complications: high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and high altitude cerebral edema(HACE).[4] Hypoxia also occurs in healthy individuals when breathing mixtures of gases with a low oxygen content, e.g. while diving underwater especially when using closed-circuit rebreather systems that control the amount of oxygen in the supplied air. Mild, non-damaging intermittent hypoxia is used intentionally during altitude training to develop an athletic performance adaptation at both the systemic and cellular level.[5]
I would have thought this explains it :

FSI once offered training (not in the chamber but with a mask and then less and less O2) and we did it.

Maybe I should have said that they offered "hypoxia training".


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Old 25th Sep 2022, 15:49
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Originally Posted by sycamore View Post
#4,How can you simulate `hypoxia` unless you go into a chamber ,and get depressurised..? in a controlled environment..
I have had the pressure chamber experience and it's quite interesting. However, I have also experienced hypoxia many times while hiking and cycling (exerting large amounts of energy) about 11,000'. Every person will have a different threshold but for me it's at about 11,000' when my thinking and balance begin to get fuzzy. There are many ways to "simulate" hypoxia.
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Old 27th Sep 2022, 12:54
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In my company we operate a CS-23 "bizjet" (it's a turboprop but the operation is the same as OP describes) under SP operations but there's always two-men crews in front. Technically the guy sitting on the right hand seat is a passenger I believe. Actually I'm not sure of his "legal status" in terms of insurance coverage etc.

But I think it's absurd that SP operation is even allowed given the amount of work involved. It's ok for a short ferry flight but for longer trips it makes no sense.
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Old 27th Sep 2022, 17:43
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Originally Posted by Central Scrutinizer View Post
It's ok for a short ferry flight but for longer trips it makes no sense.
In my experience during short flights one has the higest workload. I would rather fly with a second pilot on a 15 minute positioning flight than for two hours in the cruise... But then I have no intention to ever fly a bizjet alone.
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Old 28th Sep 2022, 10:29
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The FAA has a pressure chamber in OKC where they do free training in groups.. at least it was free 15 years ago.
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Old 28th Sep 2022, 12:17
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Originally Posted by what next View Post
In my experience during short flights one has the higest workload. I would rather fly with a second pilot on a 15 minute positioning flight than for two hours in the cruise... But then I have no intention to ever fly a bizjet alone.
Yes I see your point but I don't completely agree. There might be higher "peaks" of workload during a short flight, but the overall total amount of work to do would be less and the risk involved is also less becausre there's fewer things that could go wrong.
For a very short flight I would prepare and brief the arrival and approach on the ground before departing and I would keep things easy for myself: I would keep the speed low as far as practical for instance.

In other words, if I had to chose whether flying SP on a 15 min reposition or on a 4h cross-country, I'd do SP on the former.
I agree on the last point however: also no intention of flying a bizjet SP in any case.

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Old 1st Oct 2022, 22:12
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but the overall total amount of work to do would be less and the risk involved is also less becausre there's fewer things that could go wrong.
I´d say you´re wrong. Cruise is typically not the phase were you have issues. Or real workload. Landings and takeoffs "generate" most accidents. If your flight basically consists of a takeoff and a landing, your risk is way higher statistically.

I´ve done quite a lot of SP work mostly on KingAirs and the short hops were always the most stressful flights in my recollection.
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Old 2nd Oct 2022, 09:46
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Originally Posted by His dudeness View Post
I´d say you´re wrong. Cruise is typically not the phase were you have issues. Or real workload. Landings and takeoffs "generate" most accidents. If your flight basically consists of a takeoff and a landing, your risk is way higher statistically.

I´ve done quite a lot of SP work mostly on KingAirs and the short hops were always the most stressful flights in my recollection.
I take your point but let's agree to disagree.

It’s not a “you’re wrong” thing. It’s a “my management of workload and stress is different than yours” thing. We are both right in our own different ways.
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Old 2nd Oct 2022, 14:12
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Originally Posted by Central Scrutinizer View Post
We are both right in our own different ways.
No, not really ;-)


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Old 2nd Oct 2022, 16:58
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Originally Posted by 733driver View Post
No, not really ;-)
Guys, ok, you are right whatever.

It’s “my opinion” that flying SP on a 4h flight is overall more stressful than flying SP on a 15 min flight. The risk is also overall greater on the longer flight.

His Dudeness (the nick is ironic…), may have a different opinion. You know, that’s like, your opinion man.

I also have SP experience on a twin turboprop that’s quite a bit faster than a King Air. Don’t want to be saying “mine is longer than yours” but my opinion is equally valid.
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