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G150 pilot fatally injured in a door handling incident (EFKT)

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G150 pilot fatally injured in a door handling incident (EFKT)

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Old 8th Jan 2018, 17:00
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According to a German Newspaper ("Die Welt"), a finnish newspaper („Ilta-Sanomat“) has reported that three persons were IN the aircraft and an attempt to open the door has not been successful and then the door blew open. Parts have been found 10 meters away. That suggests the APU on and pressurization on the ground to me...
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Old 8th Jan 2018, 18:03
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Originally Posted by kaaremi View Post
when the door of the Gulfstream G-150 jet opened as he was approaching it
It's not entirely clear from reports whether the door was opened from the inside or the pilot himself was opening it when it struck him.

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Old 8th Jan 2018, 21:23
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Originally Posted by His dudeness View Post
According to a German Newspaper ("Die Welt"), a finnish newspaper („Ilta-Sanomat“) has reported that three persons were IN the aircraft and an attempt to open the door has not been successful and then the door blew open. Parts have been found 10 meters away. That suggests the APU on and pressurization on the ground to me...
Yes if it blew right out could be pressurised cabin, bad way to go though.
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Old 11th Jan 2018, 16:55
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With regards to abnormal pressurization on the ground in freezing conditions:

I'm not familiar with the G150 or it's pressurization system however on aircraft which rely on an ejector to provide the vacuum to open the outflow valves (as they should be on the ground prior to applying takeoff power) , if moisture happens to be present in the service air system supplying the ejector and is allowed to freeze this can potentially reduce or prevent vacuum production. This in turn allows the outflow valves to close and subsequently, assuming doors/windows are shut, pressurize the cabin with little or no control. Something to be certainly cautious of in cold weather OPS.
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Old 12th Jan 2018, 19:18
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I don't know the dimensions of that door, but assuming it's about 36"x50", that makes it 1800 square inches, which translates to 1800 lbs at 1 psid, and 3600lbs at 2 psid and so on. With that kind of violence, and being projected some 10 meters away, it had to weigh quite a bit.
As an example, some 30 years ago, I had depressurized a Challenger; the pressure diff. gauge read 0. The FSR on board told me to pull the handle up to open the door (we're inside). The door opened with a force that caused the skin to buckle; it bounced up about 4 feet; it required 30 hrs of repairs. I doubt anyone would have survived being hit by that force, let alone at higher psid. The door was probably closed but not locked, since the crew was still outside. And if it was locked, you could not open it with the handle; ; the weigh on the "lock plates" would be way too high; the Challenger door didn't detach nor flew away like this one, so I suggest it was only closed with the locks partially engaged possibly.
Most doors require 2 actions: one to close and one to lock it.
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Old 13th Jan 2018, 14:05
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wrench
The door didn't detach, see the picture.
"Parts have been found 10 meters away".
However, as you say, there is a lot of area there.
Very sad.
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Old 16th Jan 2018, 08:20
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The Finnish Safety Investigation Authority reported that excessive pressure had accumulated in the cabin, causing the door to open abruptly. Now, the investigation focuses on why the pressure release valve was not in operation and how the crew had been instructed in this regard.

The investigation continues and the final report is expected in 6-12 months.
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Old 19th Jan 2018, 14:10
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Report

Please share Preliminary Investigation report. Thanks.
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Old 21st Jan 2018, 20:21
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Investigation of incident involving the door of a business jet at Kittilä airport on 4 January 2018 is progressing - Onnettomuustutkintakeskus

On 11 to 12 January 2018, the Safety Investigation Authority Finland performed a forensic investigation and tests on a business jet, the door of which flew open under high pressure at Kittilä airport on 4 January. The flight's captain, who was opening the door, died in the accident.


The investigation has revealed that excess pressure had formed inside the aircraft, causing the door to fly open with explosive force. The investigation has involved the testing and analysis of matters such as the functioning, operating practices and instructions for cabin pressurisation.


The investigation by the Safety Investigation Authority Finland will continue with issues such as the analysis of data from the cabin audio recorder and flight recorder, and of the manual on using the plane. Additional interviews will also be held. The investigation will be completed within 6–12 months.



The purpose of the safety investigation is to improve safety and prevent similar accidents in the future


More information:
Ismo Aaltonen, Chief Air Safety Investigator, tel. +358 295 150 703
Sakari Lauriala, Head of Communications, tel. +358 295 150 714
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Old 11th Oct 2018, 10:45
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Safety Investigation Authority Finland has today released the final report of the accident:


htt ps://turvallisuustutkinta.fi/en/index/ajankohtaista/tiedotteet/2018/10/kittilanlentoasemalla4.1.2018tapahtuneenliikelentokoneenovit urmanonnettomuustutkintavalmis-kansainvalisiaturvallisuussuosituksiavastaavanehkaisemiseksi .html

ps. could someone post correct link. I can not yet do it...
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Old 11th Oct 2018, 11:31
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Details here ;

Accident Resulting in the Death of a Captain at Kittilä Airport on 4 January 2018

An accident that occurred in conjunction with departure preparations of a business jet on 4 January 2018 resulted in the death of the captain. The aircrew included the captain, the co-pilot and a cabin assistant. The aircraft had arrived in Kittilä two days before and was about to take off for a positioning flight without passengers. During these two days the aircraft was parked outside. Considering the season, the weather was usual. On the day of the arrival it was lightly snowing and the temperature was -5 °C; on the day of the accident the temperature was -22 °C.

On the day of the arrival the captain completed the final cockpit procedures alone while the co-pilot was outside putting on the aircraft’s external engine and sensor covers. At this point, the captain, apparently, closed the outflow valve because of the blowing snow.

On the day of the departure the co-pilot placed the aircrew’s baggage into the rear baggage compartment and began to remove snow. The captain and the cabin attendant boarded the aircraft. The captain started the APU which generates bleed air for heating the cabin and electricity for aircraft systems. The captain selected APU bleed air to be ducted into the cabin. Following this, the captain went outside to assist the co-pilot in removing snow and frost.

A moment later the captain went back inside to fetch a pair of gloves. When he came back out, he closed the door. A little later the cabin assistant inside the cabin felt pressure in her chest and ears. She went into the cockpit and knocked on the window to get the attention of the pilots. The pilots discontinued the snow removal. The captain opened the door which, owing to the significant differential pressure between the cabin and the outside, blew open with excessive force, hitting the captain and knocking him to the ground. The pressure wave also knocked the co-pilot down.

After the co-pilot got back on his feet, he alerted the Air Traffic Control by radio. The ATC, in turn, alerted the Emergency Response Centre. The co-pilot and airport workers who had arrived at the site began to administer CPR. The first ambulance arrived within 10 minutes whereupon the first responders took over and continued with the resuscitation. The co-pilot was not injured but the cabin assistant sustained minor injuries.

The operator stated that they comply with the aircraft manufacturer’s Cold Weather Operations Manual. Among other things, the Manual states that the door can be closed to expedite heating and included the following instruction: “if APU operating, check outflow valve is full open". In this case the cabin was pressurised because APU bleed air was ducted into the cabin, the ouflow valve was closed and the door was closed.

On the basis of the investigation the Safety Investigation Authority recommends that:

The Civil Aviation Authority of Israel (CAAI) supervise that Israel Aviation Industries (IAI) updates the operating manuals of the Gulfstream G150 and other comparable aircraft types. Updates to the sections that address closing the door as a means of heating or cooling the aircraft should include a caution to check that the outflow valve is fully open before the door is closed.

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) inform air operators, ground handling organisations and aerodrome rescue and firefighting organisations of a safety threat which may be caused by aircraft pressurisation on the ground and consequent explosive door openings. The bulletin must include the actions with which the safety threat can be controlled, as well as a reminder to provide the associated training to all persons involved with handling aircraft on the ground.

L2018-01 Investigation report (pdf, 1.97 Mt)

More about the subject


»
Investigation of incident involving the door of a business jet at Kittilä airport on 4 January 2018 is progressing (17.01.2018, News)
»
L2018-01 Accident leading to death of captain at Kittilä airport on 4.1.2018 (18.01.2018, Content page)
»
Safety investigation completed on a fatal business jet door accident which happened at Kittilä Airport on 4 January 2018 – international safety recommendations issued for preventing similar accidents (11.10.2018, News)

Published 11.10.2018
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Old 11th Oct 2018, 15:27
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Ouch, such a simple mistake or rather forgotten item can result in death! I just wonder, are there many types where you can close the outflow valve(s)? On my type it is all done automatically by the computers, we cannot "close" it.
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