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-   -   Do-17 salvage starts today (https://www.pprune.org/aviation-history-nostalgia/514000-do-17-salvage-starts-today.html)

sharksandwich 4th May 2013 09:51

Do-17 salvage starts today
 
A Do-17 which crashed almost intact off Kent is to be salvaged for Hendon:Yahoo! News UK & Ireland - Latest World News & UK News Headlines
The operation is expected to be completed in three weeks.

HEATHROW DIRECTOR 4th May 2013 10:13

Good luck to those involved. Hope I'm still around when the project is complete.

JW411 4th May 2013 10:57

They haven't even finished the Halifax yet!

Wander00 4th May 2013 13:20

Given the aversion of aluminium alloy to sea water, I wonder how much of the aeroplane will make it ashore, but I wish them lots of luck.

sisemen 4th May 2013 17:18


The experts warn not to expect too much
I'll drink to that.

cyflyer 5th May 2013 09:24


They haven't even finished the Halifax yet!
The Halifax is quite an effective display in its "as is" condition thank you very much. Seen it so many times over the years and well done to the museum for the display. If they can produce a similar display out of the Do17 I shall look forward to seeing it. Is there anywhere to keep up with daily progress on the salvage ?

Tiger_mate 5th May 2013 10:29

I wish the RAFM the very best of luck with this project, but there is one element of the plan that I do not like. I understand that they are going to display it inverted as that is how it presently sits on the sea bed. Understandable logic, but it may not optimise what could be an awesome display.

I guess the argument of preservation v restoration would take up a dozen pages so lets not go there. For me, a review of what is brought ashore would be the basis upon which future plans should be decided. I am therefore somewhat disappointed with present plans as a more eye pleasing display could be possible. Rarely is the underneath of an aircraft in isolation a pretty sight.

sisemen 5th May 2013 11:06


Rarely is the underneath of an aircraft in isolation a pretty sight
Particularly if the view is anything like this:

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/multim...ber_53927b.jpg

onetrack 5th May 2013 13:55

The media is making a regular noise about the Dorniers tyres still being inflated. I wonder what amount of pressure actually remains in them? I have this vision of the underwater pressure being removed upon return to the surface, and the corroded wheels exploding upon removal from the water by the residual tyre pressure. I guess the salvagers would have thought of that, and found some way to deflate the tyres? :confused:

DaveReidUK 5th May 2013 17:55


Sonar images have confirmed the Dornier Do 17 is in good condition with its tyres still inflated
I suspect that neither of those predictions will turn out to be the case.

cyflyer 5th May 2013 18:05


there is one element of the plan that I do not like. I understand that they are going to display it inverted as that is how it presently sits on the sea bed
Have to agree here. At least right way up............

jensdad 5th May 2013 19:17

2 of the crew died in the ditching. If the remains are still in the wreckage would the usual protocol not be to leave it on the seabed as a war grave? Having said that, if they are still inside, I'm sure that they will be returned to Germany for burial.

DaveReidUK 5th May 2013 23:15


If the remains are still in the wreckage
They aren't.

Noyade 6th May 2013 23:31


A fleet of 1,700 were built as passenger planes before Hitler ordered their conversion to bombers.
Fascinating...

sisemen 7th May 2013 03:24

'Twas in the days when the catchphrase was "Us? Rearming? Perish the thought".

I suspect that the "conversion" was little more than a small tweak.

WHBM 7th May 2013 08:27


A fleet of 1,700 were built as passenger planes before Hitler ordered their conversion to bombers.
This is unfortunately a complete nonsense. There were probably less than 1,700 passenger aircraft worldwide in 1939. The Dornier was too small a fuselage for passenger use, and pre-war Lufthansa didn't have any in its fleet, its principal type was the Junkers 52/3m. The only Dorniers operated by Lufthansa pre-war were a small number of flying boats.

sisemen 7th May 2013 08:43

Like I say

"Us? Rearming? Perish the thought".
Dornier Do 17 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


In 1932, the Ordnance Department (Heereswaffenamt) issued a specification for the construction of a "freight aircraft for German State Railways", and a "high speed mail plane for Lufthansa".[1] The factory at Friedrichshafen began work on the design on 1 August 1932.[1]

When the Nazis took power in 1933, Hermann Göring became National Commissar for aviation with former Deutsche Luft Hansa employee Erhard Milch as his deputy, soon forming the Ministry of Aviation. The Ministry of Aviation designated the new aircraft Do 17, and on 17 March 1933, just three months after taking office, Milch gave the go-ahead for the building of prototypes. At the end of 1933, the Ministry of Aviation issued an order for a "high speed aircraft with double tail," and for a "freight aircraft with special equipment," in other words, a bomber. The original design (the Do 17 V1) configuration in 1932 had sported a single vertical stabilizer, and Dornier continued developing that model. The Do 17 was first demonstrated in mock-up form in April 1933. The "special equipment" was to be fitted later, to disguise its offensive role.[4]

........the Do 17 V1 was contracted as a fast six-passenger mail plane

Noyade 7th May 2013 09:36


This is unfortunately a complete nonsense.
Absolutely mate. A myth that was debunked by the research of Karl Kössler in the eighties...

http://i39.tinypic.com/2d598l.jpg

cyflyer 7th May 2013 10:27

Some more info here:
Dornier 17 conservation | Whats going on? | Cosford | RAF Museum

bobward 9th May 2013 10:27

Restoration
 
Ref the Hendon Halifax, and it's non-restoration. The Canadiand also recovered a Halifax from a Norwegian lake. It's been totally restored, and is now at Trenton's museum. It looks magnificent.

This suggests that the aircraft can be restored, if the will is there. At the time I think the RAFM were thinking of it, but, based on the amount of work it took to restore the nose turret, decided against it.

Can anyone else confirm that?

B


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