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Why does no one want the Beverley?

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Why does no one want the Beverley?

Old 7th Aug 2022, 09:09
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The 'metalwork' on the back end of the freight bay was fitted post '58 - (when I left). The Bev's 'wake' was quite powerful and, when operating load drops, the freight bay 'clam-shells' were removed and 'elephant ears' were fitted to prevent wake interference. They were originally designed to deal with the problem of para dropping from the boom with the clam shells removed. ... the initial test drops (with dummies) resulted in the dummies being 'diverted' into the freight bay, instead of dropping clear !!
As a one-time 'meat bomb' despatcher, I wouldn't be happy having that sort of metalwork to the rear of the freight bay side doors, so Treadders may be close to the mark.
Generally speaking, our 'meat bomb customers reckoned that the boom floor exit gave the smoothest exit of any.
On a sadder note, that boom exit door cost the life of our co-pilot on an intended early morning departure from K'sar - RIP

Last edited by Cornish Jack; 8th Aug 2022 at 21:49.
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Old 7th Aug 2022, 12:15
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On one of my cadet's Beverly flights, several of the cadets climbed up the side into the tailboom.
One cadet saw a hatch in the floor and operated the handle and immediately the hatch started opening so several other cadets (not me, I was still downstairs) leapt on it and managed to shut it again.!
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Old 7th Aug 2022, 12:51
  #63 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Cornish Jack
The 'metalwork' on the back end of the freight bay was fitted post '58 - (when I left). The Bev's 'wake' was quite powerful and, when operating load drops, the freight bay 'clam-shells' were removed and 'elephant ears' were fitted to prevent wake interference.
That explanation would make sense, were it not for the fact that the ironwork was attached to the clamshell doors and so was not present with the doors removed.

The "elephant ears", on the other hand, were attached to the fuselage structure:




but that's not what Fargo Boyle was asking about.

Blackburn Beverley C1, XB259 / 1002, Ministry of Defence : ABPic

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Old 7th Aug 2022, 13:41
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Originally Posted by DHfan
As both Dishforth and Abingdon are Army sites, they're not in the heritage sector.
And both up for eventual disposal as the Army is vacating them.
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Old 7th Aug 2022, 17:14
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Since the first few photos seemed quite popular here are a few more of XB259's arrival at Hull Aero Club's airfield at Paull in what was then North Humberside. It was backed off the runway using reverse thrust from the engines but a large tow truck was needed to manoeuvre it into what was thought at the time would be its final resting place.




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Old 7th Aug 2022, 18:09
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Did XB259 always have the large props ? I seem to remember that one of the Beverleys -possibly the Farnborough one- had smaller props similar to a Brit's props.
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Old 7th Aug 2022, 21:23
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"It was backed off the runway using reverse thrust" ...... thanks for that walbut.

I was another ATC cadet who had a flight in a Beverley (probably at Abingdon) in the 1950's but all I can remember is that we seemed to be very high up in that tailboom, we did lots of "circuits and bumps", and that I was amazed when the aircraft taxied backwards a few yards under its own power. I was beginning to think that I had imagined that last bit, so thank you for confirming I haven't completely "lost it" yet.

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Old 8th Aug 2022, 10:01
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Dave Reid - we seem to be at cross-purposes ... my poor description, i suspect !
The items which Fargo Boyle was querying were not a fitment during my time on the fleet., so i would have to guess at their purpose. Dispatching from the side doors, as with any aircraft required minimum obstructions to the rear, and I would have thought that those items were such. The 'elephanls' ears', however, were a regular standard fit for heavy drops during my time.
76 fan's reference to Bev reversing, triggers the entry-into-service 'hiccup' with that function. Some of Dishforth's dispersal pans sloped downwards to the rear and an attempt was made to park using reverse. The Bev being primarily electrically 'controlled' had a set of 'prop interruptor' switches on the flight deck coaming (a part of the prop de-icing system) These switches had to be appropriately selected when the WOW switches were made, in order to allow deselection of reverse thrust. As you may have guessed,... they weren't - and having started a downhill reverse, the only means of halting was the brakes, with the result of an underside tailstrike and a very nose-high recovery !! Lessons were learned and the 'after landers' appropriately amended !!
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Old 8th Aug 2022, 13:27
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Thanks all for your interesting and informative answers. Is the metalwork still attached to the aeroplane, or is the whole thing even still in one piece apart from the engines? Sad to say I would be surprised to see anything more than another cockpit section remaining in a couple of years...
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Old 8th Aug 2022, 18:48
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Blackburn Aircraft, printed 1961.



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Old 9th Aug 2022, 04:05
  #71 (permalink)  
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Found this by accident ....it appears getting out in a hurry was the exact opposite ! . I like the bit where they happily climb up the internal structure looking like wall bars in a gym to get to the upper deck


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Old 9th Aug 2022, 09:45
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K'n C - very nostalgia inducing !
The troops loading into the boom via the freight bay was unusual - the normal method was to use a wheeled boom loading ladder hooked onto the boom floor hatch opening.
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Old 9th Aug 2022, 11:49
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K'n C's clip tempted me to search for other such. Among quite a few, there was one from 'Torces News' (whoever they are) on the auction of the Paull relic. The commentary spoke of a 'soldier fatality' through the boom hatch. It wasn't a soldier - it was our co-pilot doing an 0400 preflight in K'sar when the hatch was opened while he was up in the tail behind the toilets and backed out into a void. What was particularly tragic was that we had the only aircraft which hadn't been modified with floor pins connected toi the hatch to prevent such a thing happening.
It was not a good day and made worse by the attitude of the local 'brass' !!
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Old 9th Aug 2022, 16:07
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Almost 52 yrs ago(13/8/70) I was `co-opted `to fly as co-pilot in XB261,at AAEE with Capt `Jake `Wormworth,RCAF/CDF Exchange pilot on `B`Sqdn,to fly an ULLA drop on Salisbury Plain.It turned out to be the heaviest ULLA ever dropped,so I think it was well over 30K Lbs.I can`t remember whether it was multiple pallets,or one single large load.However,on `extraction` as the load moves aft,so does the C of G,and this will lead to significant pitch inputs.Not only that ,but the`drop height` has to remain constant at about 10 ft wheel height,using the radar altimeter.Now the `run-in`approach to the DZ that day was not very flat,so I was in `charge` of the engine-room,over 10k Horsepower,to maintain airspeed,and height,as Jake pushed/pulled the control column,whilst also `conned` by the Navigator in the lower-deck aimers window.We did one `dummy` run just to make sure we were all on the same `hymn-sheet`,and then the final drop,which went as planned....but it was 30 secs of `full and free` controls by Jake....Fortunately ,the Bar in the OM opened early for a few `refreshers afterwards`...
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Old 9th Aug 2022, 16:55
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Correction, Correction.Correction !!!
Just found another Bev youtube clip showing freight deck side door para dropping. Never did, or saw, thia in service, so a first - and, there were the mystery attachments.
So, in total contradiction to my supposition, they were a required fit for side -door para and thinking about it, they were probably a means of preventing the static line strops from simultaneous side exits getting tangled and not being able to recover them onboard. Apologies for any confusion caused - ... it is a condition, of which, I am well aware !
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Old 12th Aug 2022, 15:53
  #76 (permalink)  
 
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Hi CJ. You are quite right. I have a few pictures of our 84 Sqn Bevs dropping members of 2 Para over Nanyuki in about 1965. They were definitely dispatched through the side doors.There are a couple of pics of the aircrew and one of the ALM precariously hanging on to a seat netting as he peered out through the door. The quality is not great, but if anyone is interested, I can post them.
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Old 12th Aug 2022, 16:42
  #77 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by Helena Handbasket
if anyone is interested, I can post them.
Please do!
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Old 12th Aug 2022, 17:47
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Going out the side doors



Loading troops to the upper deck



And a nice video of them departing the same way....


And another fascinating Beverly video ....




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Old 13th Aug 2022, 05:02
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Over Nanyuki

Making sure that everyone hit the ground

I think he is lost

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Old 13th Aug 2022, 09:19
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Excellent pics !
With boom mic headsets, definitely after my time !!
Loading via the boom ladder - in the situation as shown, no sensible captain would release brakes to start taxying ... would they ?
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