Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Misc. Forums > Aviation History and Nostalgia
Reload this Page >

British Airways Concorde pilots of the 1970s

Aviation History and Nostalgia Whether working in aviation, retired, wannabee or just plain fascinated this forum welcomes all with a love of flight.

British Airways Concorde pilots of the 1970s

Old 16th Sep 2021, 19:30
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: under the sea
Posts: 2,578
British Airways Concorde pilots of the 1970s

I was reading an article recently and it mentioned Captain E C Miles of BA who flew Concorde on route proving flights but never in commercial service. I have also seen mention that a number of senior pilots on the original intake did not complete the course. Did this failure rate discourage other BA pilots from applying and from a financial aspect was it a fleet to be on?
tubby linton is online now  
Old 17th Sep 2021, 10:57
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Dorset UK
Age: 68
Posts: 1,375
I flew with an ex BOAC / BA captain who was offered Concorde but preferred to stay on the 747 to continue to see the world rather than just New York and Washington.
dixi188 is offline  
Old 17th Sep 2021, 11:13
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: OZ
Posts: 1,033
Hi dixi,
I understand where this pilot is coming from.
We longhaul guys tend to always be looking at the horizon wondering what's over it.
mustafagander is offline  
Old 17th Sep 2021, 20:23
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: se england
Posts: 1,314
As i understood it from a couple of BA pilot friends every effort internally was made to ensure Concorde was a not any form of elite and the life style didnt suit many crew anyway so there were far far more pilots who never even bid for it than actually didnt make the training . I think the pay scales were much the same as any other Long haul crew as well. But were there ever any ladies in the front seats . Well technically my wife would qualify except that as a 'fam' trip Speedbird London radio op she was along for the ride and 'familiarisation ' and only sat in the seat for ten mins in the cruise Lol.

The SSB ops girls regularly got these trips as it was felt there would be a better understanding of the problems of HF radio (basically that its pretty useless way of communicating and needs alot of patience on both ends ) but there was no alternative in the 70s. it also aided the informal relationship with the SSB girls passing on all kinds of excuses to wives girlfriends etc from the flight deck along with cricket scores, instructions to wives /girlfriends not to forget watering garden, get the car serviced or similar . A very nice and job actually well paid because it was shift work and only given up as baby came along , perhaps as he got a lot of 'invitations ' especially from US crews who used Speedbird perhaps it was a good thing for me she did give it up LOL
pax britanica is offline  
Old 18th Sep 2021, 01:59
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: N/A
Posts: 4,098
But were there ever any ladies in the front seats
Yes, three,Barbara Harmer of British Airways, Béatrice Vialle of Air France, and Jacqueline Auriol who was one of the first test pilots ever to fly Concorde, working with the André Turcat to take the prototype 001 through its development program it is said, though I doubt the extent of her actual involvement.
megan is offline  
Old 18th Sep 2021, 09:56
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: britain
Posts: 394
I knew a BA Concorde FO who, by that time was a captain on 777s he never talked to his FOs about his time on Comcorde for fear that they would think his head was up his a**se
bean is offline  
Old 18th Sep 2021, 12:21
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: by the seaside
Age: 72
Posts: 1,023
Bean

A couple of my course mates went onto her- one notable ex merchant navy "officier" stated he wanted nothing to do with the rest of our course as none of you appreciated how difficult it was to fly and what a fantastic pilot I am...
Personally four things put me off.. route structure, amount of flying (one time they were flying with double crews to keep recency), being frozen on type until command (15? years) and that it was known as the Masons Fleet. All valid reasons for a bloke from Essex who wanted to see the world and fly.
blind pew is online now  
Old 18th Sep 2021, 12:40
  #8 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: uk
Posts: 1,698
At a reunion for my wife's primary schoool class, one of her ex class mates (RT) was described as a Concorde pilot. I got to chat with him and he told me that he was currently flying the 747. In my ignorance I suggested that was a bit of a come down. "God no," he said, "its a much better life. I get to many more places and it has modern avionics, much better than the 60's versions in the Concorde."
pulse1 is online now  
Old 18th Sep 2021, 12:40
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: South East of Penge
Age: 71
Posts: 1,593
IIRC the nickname " The Poison Dwarf" being applied to the type in BA ( The later and then late Mrs. Haraka was cabin crew on the fleet in the 70's for several years) .
Haraka is online now  
Old 18th Sep 2021, 20:14
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Everett, WA
Age: 66
Posts: 3,373
Originally Posted by pulse1 View Post
At a reunion for my wife's primary schoool class, one of her ex class mates (RT) was described as a Concorde pilot. I got to chat with him and he told me that he was currently flying the 747. In my ignorance I suggested that was a bit of a come down. "God no," he said, "its a much better life. I get to many more places and it has modern avionics, much better than the 60's versions in the Concorde."
What year was that? I'd think that would have had to been a 747-400 since the I doubt the avionics on the early 747 models were that much different than the Concorde.
tdracer is online now  
Old 19th Sep 2021, 07:42
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: In front of a computer
Posts: 2,086
every effort internally was made to ensure Concorde was a not any form of elite
Apart from the gold lettering on the photo ID
ETOPS is offline  
Old 3rd Oct 2021, 23:00
  #12 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: under the sea
Posts: 2,578
Any more on why a BA Captain flew the aircraft but never in service? Did he retire?
tubby linton is online now  
Old 4th Oct 2021, 12:13
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne
Age: 36
Posts: 89
I recall a story where although Concorde pilots were on the same pay scale as other long haul BA pilots, they actually ended up earning less in duty pay than their colleagues on other fleets. This was due to the limited route network and as it was faster, less duty pay per flying hour.
The Flying Stool is offline  
Old 4th Oct 2021, 13:37
  #14 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: near an airplane
Posts: 2,049
Originally Posted by tubby linton View Post
Any more on why a BA Captain flew the aircraft but never in service? Did he retire?
I did a quick search for Captain E.C. Miles and found a reference to him in this book. The book quotes an article from 'The Age' that may well be the one you read originally. I noticed that it refers to Captain Miles' thirty year career. Counting back, it means that his civil flying career must have started just after WWII, which equates to him most likely having a background of flying military stuff during WWII and putting him pretty close to a possible retirement age at the time of the Concorde's route proving programme. This is a guestimate of course, but it could explain why he didn't continue flying the type in service.
Have you tried e-mailing the webmaster of ConcordeSST.com about this question? He might be able to answer it, or perhaps knows of someone who could explain it.
Jhieminga is online now  
Old 5th Oct 2021, 08:20
  #15 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: under the sea
Posts: 2,578
Many thanks. I will drop the webmaster a message.
tubby linton is online now  
Old 6th Oct 2021, 08:16
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Australia
Age: 55
Posts: 2,049
About halfway through Micheal Riley’s book, A Concorde In My Toybox.

The British Airways checking and training system of that area seems to be a little interesting, which would make the Concorde operation very interesting.
Stationair8 is offline  
Old 6th Oct 2021, 08:32
  #17 (permalink)  
Gnome de PPRuNe
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Too close to Croydon for comfort
Age: 57
Posts: 8,974
A Concorde in my Toy Box is an excellent read - disappointed to finish it first time round even though it made my arms tired...
treadigraph is online now  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.