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Can anyone identify this instrument?

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Can anyone identify this instrument?

Old 7th Jan 2021, 16:30
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Can anyone identify this instrument?




Can anyone identify the instrument above? I work at SolentSky Museum in Southampton where we have a Sandringham VH-LVE. This is a derivation from the Sunderland. The instrument above with Red/Green sections, a horizonatlly oriented needle and marked IN/OUT with 2 markers on the Green section. On our aircraft, it is in the Engine Management section of the control panel.
Can anyone identify its use? Or does anyone have a better picture of one? Could it be the flap position indicator? But if so, why the red area?

Ours is missing, and I am seeking to create a mock up to go in its place. But it would be nice to know what it is.

Thanks
Corsairoz

Last edited by Corsairoz; 7th Jan 2021 at 19:01.
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Old 7th Jan 2021, 16:37
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Flap position indicator, since it appears to be next to what's left of a Flaps In/Out switch ?
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Old 7th Jan 2021, 16:57
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Cooling Flaps of some sort, Green band temp ok, Red requires cooling rather than Wing flaps I would hazard a guess as it is on the Engine Management side, admittedly they are normally called Gills although I am happy to be corrected.
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Old 7th Jan 2021, 17:26
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Originally Posted by DH106 View Post
Flap position indicator, since it appears to be next to what's left of a Flaps In/Out switch ?
I would agree and I don’t know for sure, but the red area presumably is a “no take-off” zone.
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Old 7th Jan 2021, 17:52
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If you look at this image the gauge is in the centre panel and it appears to have the word flaps printed between the red and green.


https://www.jetphotos.com/photo/230305
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Old 7th Jan 2021, 18:14
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Are the markers 1/3 and 2/3? Which may tie in with flap position.
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Old 7th Jan 2021, 18:22
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Flaps do appear plausible, but cowl flaps may also be an option if the gauge is near the engine management section.
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Old 7th Jan 2021, 18:31
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Page 118 of the Solent manual describes it. Red range is fully in to 1/3rd out and is supplemented by a lamp.

https://www.seawings.co.uk/images/ma...e%20Manual.pdf
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Old 7th Jan 2021, 18:32
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Originally Posted by Jhieminga View Post
Flaps do appear plausible, but cowl flaps may also be an option if the gauge is near the engine management section.
I thought that too, but you would have 4 then.
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Old 7th Jan 2021, 18:33
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This image appeared when searching for ‘Sunderland flap position indicator’
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Old 7th Jan 2021, 19:03
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Excellent, that solves a mystery I think. Thanks all.

Come and see us at SolentSky once allowed and I'll show you around the flight deck of VP-LVE.

Corsairoz
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Old 8th Jan 2021, 14:23
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I'd like to know what is the instrument labelled "PILOT" just above the RDF(?) tuner.
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Old 8th Jan 2021, 16:45
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Thank you for showing us the Solent D&S Manual Nutloose. A fascinating read through of aero engineering history.
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Old 8th Jan 2021, 19:50
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I'd like to know what is the instrument labelled "PILOT" just above the RDF(?) tuner.
That is an early alcohol meter.

0 (Zero) N (normal) ~ (warning) E (excessive) 6 (six sheets to the wind).
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Old 8th Jan 2021, 20:32
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Originally Posted by Fareastdriver View Post
That is an early alcohol meter.

0 (Zero) N (normal) ~ (warning) E (excessive) 6 (six sheets to the wind).
The scale on the left has N and T at the extremes of the range.

At a guess, that's (N)ewt (as in "p*ss*d as a ...) and (T)eetotal.

A more boring explanation would be (N)ose and (T)ail.
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Old 8th Jan 2021, 21:23
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Some sort of trim or elevator indication? I think I can see the word “HEAVY” between T and N. Also there is the “LB” marking below “PILOT”, so maybe a measurement of stick force?

Last edited by eckhard; 9th Jan 2021 at 08:43.
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