Aviation History and Nostalgia Whether working in aviation, retired, wannabee or just plain fascinated this forum welcomes all with a love of flight.

BAE / AVRO 146

Old 7th Dec 2019, 11:49
  #61 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Australia
Posts: 4,182
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Flew a BAE 146 simulator for the first time the other day. Found the throttles very stiff to operate and quite distracting. Are the throttles in the real aeroplane like that?
Centaurus is offline  
Old 7th Dec 2019, 15:24
  #62 (permalink)  

"Mildly" Eccentric Stardriver
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: England
Age: 76
Posts: 3,852
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Are the throttles in the real aeroplane like that?
Not that I recall, but it was many years ago.
Herod is offline  
Old 7th Dec 2019, 16:14
  #63 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Northampton
Posts: 5
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I seem to remember that the 146 made its mark by being the only jet allowed to operate into airfields in the LA area that had a jet ban due to noise.
rogerg is offline  
Old 7th Dec 2019, 21:37
  #64 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Australia
Age: 56
Posts: 2,136
Likes: 0
Received 7 Likes on 4 Posts
Just like grandma’s Austin 1800, I always thought.

The Bring Another Engine was always very comfortable to fly in as a passenger- flown in them with Ansett, East- West and Southern Airlines.

Mate in Ansett reckons it was the only aeroplane that could get a bird strike up the rear, it was that slow.
Stationair8 is offline  
Old 8th Dec 2019, 02:05
  #65 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: UK / FIN
Posts: 43
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Centaurus View Post
Flew a BAE 146 simulator for the first time the other day. Found the throttles very stiff to operate and quite distracting. Are the throttles in the real aeroplane like that?
There is 100% mechanical connection from throttle lever to eng FCU, they are "firm" to use and over time they tends to stiffens. You are talking simutor but in real life they are anot feather light to use.
From levers there is rod down to autothrottle clutches, directly under pedestal on E-bay, from there all the way up to the each engine pylon you will find steel cables and pulleys, from pylon to FCU is teleflex cable. (which needs frequent lubrication with thin oil to avoid extra stiffness)

If my memory serves right, throttles were quite unsophisticated to use. They felt all the time like something is chafing... Not pilot, but had hands on experience when doing eng ground runs.
Don't know how it was in the air if you need to adjust power, but on ground runs if you need to find some exact values for test purposes, moving these throttles requires sometimes few try to find correct position.

Last edited by Corrosion; 8th Dec 2019 at 02:41.
Corrosion is offline  
Old 8th Dec 2019, 04:39
  #66 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Chicken Run
Posts: 1,057
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
In the air I found 'Boeing' to be the answer, since engine control was such that one could demand and synchronise temperstures as required, the numbers 717, 727, 737, and 747 from memory giving reasonable results.

Aircraft model shop at Castle Donington produced a replica for their display featuring two big engines and winglets. Such dreamers!
JENKINS is offline  
Old 8th Dec 2019, 11:03
  #67 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: UK
Posts: 2,342
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
History and nostalgia to aid reminiscence - some large files

146 described
https://www.dropbox.com/s/i1oqswgdzy...ribed.pdf?dl=0

Production list, operators, and historical location, 2012
https://www.dropbox.com/s/53ypihjnhj...J1203.pdf?dl=0

146 Design features, tech sales
https://www.dropbox.com/s/cajqtqsjwu...tures.pdf?dl=0

146 Flightdeck features tech sales
https://www.dropbox.com/s/6c3ii2eim5...on%20.pdf?dl=0

safetypee is offline  
Old 8th Dec 2019, 11:44
  #68 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Norfolk
Posts: 428
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Corrosion View Post
There is 100% mechanical connection from throttle lever to eng FCU, they are "firm" to use and over time they tends to stiffens. You are talking simutor but in real life they are anot feather light to use.
From levers there is rod down to autothrottle clutches, directly under pedestal on E-bay, from there all the way up to the each engine pylon you will find steel cables and pulleys, from pylon to FCU is teleflex cable.
....... with the TMS actuator the very last link between the teleflex and the FCU. I think the throttles could be a bit stiff. The fire handles/fuel shutoff were even worse as they didn't get used so often.
Vendee is offline  
Old 8th Dec 2019, 16:52
  #69 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: UK / FIN
Posts: 43
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Vendee View Post
....... with the TMS actuator the very last link between the teleflex and the FCU. I think the throttles could be a bit stiff. The fire handles/fuel shutoff were even worse as they didn't get used so often.
Yes, i forget that because i haven't done almost any real work with 146. Only with RJ, no TMS but FADEC, which is different especially on engine/engine controils area, as everyone here knows.

Think i work once with old 146 which was converted to RJ, that was bit strange bird as it is kind of mixture of both. It was one of the Braathens old birds on last C-check.
Corrosion is offline  
Old 8th Dec 2019, 17:16
  #70 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: London
Posts: 206
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Stationair8 View Post
Just like grandma’s Austin 1800, I always thought.

The Bring Another Engine was always very comfortable to fly in as a passenger- flown in them with Ansett, East- West and Southern Airlines.

Mate in Ansett reckons it was the only aeroplane that could get a bird strike up the rear, it was that slow.
No, we all know that was the Shorts Belfast (or "Belslow"!)
possel is offline  
Old 8th Dec 2019, 18:38
  #71 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Northampton
Posts: 5
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
414 kts, mach .68 was not to bad as it also could land on a six pence
rogerg is offline  
Old 8th Dec 2019, 20:26
  #72 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Stockport
Age: 83
Posts: 283
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I have a vague recollection from the early 1960s that what became the 146 originated as a Handley Page concept, but was not proceeded with because of a lack of suitable sized engines. Then the Continentals came along, and the concept was resurrected.
Dairyground is offline  
Old 8th Dec 2019, 20:38
  #73 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Reading, UK
Posts: 14,602
Likes: 0
Received 27 Likes on 12 Posts
Originally Posted by meleagertoo View Post
As it was it comfortably outsold any other UK airliner - ever.
No, it didn't.

DaveReidUK is offline  
Old 8th Dec 2019, 20:56
  #74 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: EGLL
Posts: 537
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
A mere 387 examples (!), outstripped by 445 Viscounts...
G-ARZG is offline  
Old 8th Dec 2019, 21:05
  #75 (permalink)  
Gnome de PPRuNe
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Too close to Croydon for comfort
Age: 58
Posts: 10,923
Received 4 Likes on 4 Posts
380 748s, only slightly fewer!

I suggest "UK airliner" could also include the Dove and the Rapide both of which comfortably outsold even the Viscount!
treadigraph is online now  
Old 8th Dec 2019, 23:10
  #76 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: UK
Posts: 1,894
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Well if we are throwing the Dove into the mix then its replacement, the DH125, outsold it many times over.
spekesoftly is online now  
Old 8th Dec 2019, 23:20
  #77 (permalink)  
Gnome de PPRuNe
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Too close to Croydon for comfort
Age: 58
Posts: 10,923
Received 4 Likes on 4 Posts
And the Islander?
treadigraph is online now  
Old 8th Dec 2019, 23:37
  #78 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Reading, UK
Posts: 14,602
Likes: 0
Received 27 Likes on 12 Posts
Here we go again ...

PPRuNe: Best Selling British Airliner? (2012)
DaveReidUK is offline  
Old 9th Dec 2019, 09:12
  #79 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Dorset UK
Age: 69
Posts: 1,571
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by G-ARZG View Post
A mere 387 examples (!), outstripped by 445 Viscounts...
I have a photo somewhere of my father in front of the last Viscount built with a sign saying 444th aircraft. (or maybe the 444th delivered)
dixi188 is online now  
Old 9th Dec 2019, 09:53
  #80 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 5,223
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Clicked on the link and my anti-virus (AVG) immediately neutralised a threat.
Fareastdriver is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.