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help identifying 1932 era aeroplane

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help identifying 1932 era aeroplane

Old 20th Apr 2017, 09:32
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help identifying 1932 era aeroplane

hi , wondering if anyone knows what type of aircraft this is and any thing else about story behind the picture etc
thanks dean

Aeroplane in a field at Quaker's Hill, New South Wales, 20 May 1932, 2 [picture].

all the thumbnails relating to it
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Old 20th Apr 2017, 10:20
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Looks a bit like a Curtiss Robin, although it appears not to have wing struts, only flying wires.
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Old 20th Apr 2017, 13:20
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Looks rather like a Koolhoven FK.41 or more likely a licence-built Dessouter? Not entirely alike the pic though...
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Old 20th Apr 2017, 13:46
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None of the above aircraft i.e. Curtiss Robin, Koolhoven or Dessouter fit the bill as they all have struts rather twin king posts with bracing wires. Most, but I am guessing not all, Robins were fitted with radial engines. Oh, I am pretty certain it is not of British manufacture.
I have had a careful look at the photographs and can find no evidence of any registration marks or script on the aircraft. There is a small star logo on the fuselage and the wings. If you look further at the photographs the logo and the word TEXACO are evident on a can of fuel.
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Old 20th Apr 2017, 13:59
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This might be related to these images:
Monoplane built by J.R. Jones for a Trans-Tasman flight, Ryde, New South Wales, 15 December 1932

Monoplane built by L.J.K. Jones for Trans Tasman Flights at Ryde, Sydney, 15 December 1931

The undercarriage and engine configuration seems to be very similar, same as the cockpit glazing. The main difference is in the location of the oil cooler and the rudder seems larger on your image. Could this chap have built several aircraft?

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Old 20th Apr 2017, 14:19
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VH-ULZ Jones "Wonga" Monoplane (c/n 1)



The Wonga was a single engine, high wing monoplane designed by L.J.R. Jones and built during
1929-30. Some sources indicate it was built from the remains of the Boulton & Paul P.9
G-AUCT, although it bears little resemblance to that aircraft. The rare shot above is from the
Fairfax glass plate negative archives (via the NLA) and the caption indicates the machine was
developed for a Trans Tasman flight. It flew successfully for about 100 hours of testing, but
unfortunately crashed during a one such test flight at Quaker's Hill, NSW on 16 June 1932. It
appears that the aircraft was flying very low in bad weather at the time, and loss of control due
to turbulence was given as the cause of the crash. Both pilot and passenger were killed.


Interesting the location of Quaker's Hill in mentioned both in the information supplied by the OP
and in connection with the Jones "Wonga".......
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Old 20th Apr 2017, 14:27
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Some more info:

"This paper discusses the design, construction, and testing of the first monoplane to be built in Australia of welded steel tubing. Design and construction was commenced in 1927 by L. J. R. Jones, who was an outstanding figure in the field of aeronautical engineering in Australia in its formative years. The monoplane, generally known by the name Wonga, was completed and successfully flight-tested in 1930. Plans to make international flights and to put it into commercial production were aborted successively by construction delays and storm damage. In 1931 and 1932 it was reconstructed and re-engined with an Australian designed and built engine, the Harkness Hornet. Although it showed every indication of being a remarkably successful and innovative design, the project was ended when the Wonga crashed in conditions of severe wind and turbulence in June 1932. The subsequent investigation into the loss of the aircraft was significant in its own right, involving the first investigations ever conducted in the southern hemisphere using models and a wind tunnel. Some of those who were involved in the project went on to another which was perhaps of even greater significance. Jones remained active as an aeronautical designer and engineer for some time, and was involved soon afterwards in other innovative work. He was generally ahead of his contemporaries in carrying his work into effect. Neither historians nor engineers have given him adequate recognition."

Fourth National Conference on Engineering Heritage 1988: Preprints of Papers - Australia's First All-steel Monoplane (Engineering Collection) - Informit
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Old 20th Apr 2017, 14:31
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The aircraft in question is the "Wonga" - the solitary prototype high-wing aircraft designed and built in 1930 by Australia's first qualified aeronautical engineer, Leslie John Roberts Jones.
The aircraft was originally powered by a Curtiss, but the engine fitted in the photo is a replacement for the original Curtiss - it is a "Harkness Hornet", another Australian-design aircraft engine, produced by Harkness & Hillier in 1929.
This engine powered only two models of aircraft, the "Wonga" and the Genairco biplane. Unfortunately, the Harkness aero engine was not a commercial success.

ANU - Biography - Leslie John Roberts Jones

Ed Coates collection - VH-ULZ - the Jones "Wonga"

The Harkness Hornet aero engine
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Old 20th Apr 2017, 14:38
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FLYING TRAGEDY.

CRASH IN AUSTRALIA.

LOCALLY-MADE MACHINE.

TWO OCCUPANTS KILLED. By Telegraph—Press Association—Copyright. (Received June 16, 0.55 p.m.) SYDNEY, June 16. A tragic flying accident occurred to-day at Quakers Hill, near Parramatta. The. Australian'-made "Jones" monoplane, which was built for a projected flight to New Zealand, crashed, and its two occupants, Messrs. Roy Mitchell, of Mosman, and Arthur Raines, a prominent speed motorist, were killed. Mr. Mitchell had been testing the machine for some time and took Mr. Barnes as a. passenger for a "joy-ride."

Eye-witnesses saw the machine turn sideways and then fall in a steep dive into a paddock where Mr. Mitchell had a hut for camping during the tests. The engine was buried in the earth and the fuselage was a crumpled and broken mass. Both men were killed instantly. A party, including Mr. Don Harkness and the designer of the monoplane, Mr. L. R. Jones, dashed to the spot and dragged the victims from the wreckage.

The same machine was forced down on June 5 at Stuart Town during an experimental flight to Bourke, Messrs. Mitchell and Jones then being the occupants. They were missing for nearly two days. Mr. Mitchell, who has been killed, was making plans for a trans Tasman flight in the wrecked machine, which was designed and constructed by Mr. L. R. J. Jones, lecturer at the Technical College, Ultimo. The machine, a high-wing cabin monoplane, was built at Ryde. and took 12 months to complete. It was powered with a Harkness " Hornet " engine of 110 horsepower.

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Old 20th Apr 2017, 22:25
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Thank you , everyone , I never imagined such detailed information would be forthcoming , much appreciated
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