Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Misc. Forums > Aviation History and Nostalgia
Reload this Page >

How to fly the Chipmunk (1968)

Aviation History and Nostalgia Whether working in aviation, retired, wannabee or just plain fascinated this forum welcomes all with a love of flight.

How to fly the Chipmunk (1968)

Old 5th Mar 2017, 17:28
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 1999
Location: SEUK
Age: 73
Posts: 641
How to fly the Chipmunk (1968)

Going through my archives I found this brief issued to us Cadet Pilots at Leeds UAS prior to a visit from the CFS trappers in 1968.
Discorde is offline  
Old 5th Mar 2017, 18:07
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: UK
Posts: 16
Excellent find. How typical of the time. Loved it!
Raymond Dome is offline  
Old 5th Mar 2017, 18:17
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: CYWH (Victoria)
Posts: 5,519
Great stuff, Discorde. Brings it all back.

I was with UBAS at Shawbury at the same time. I think I flew with a Trapper twice, but I don't remember any special briefing other than "Fly normally" - certainly no briefing notes like yours.

I like the last sentence:
Offer 'Sir' a coffee; it helps.
I've also just noticed this gem in the notes:

If you don't know what 'windshear' is, ask your instructor to confuse you with his explanation.
Flt. Lt. Kidney obviously had a very good sense of humour!

All in all, a very nice, concise set of 'mini Pilot's Notes'

Last edited by India Four Two; 5th Mar 2017 at 21:24.
India Four Two is offline  
Old 5th Mar 2017, 19:29
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: UK
Age: 76
Posts: 193
Of that time.........

This photo and article turned up on the BBC News website a couple of days ago: UAS Chipmunks over Aberdeen 1960's
Democritus is offline  
Old 5th Mar 2017, 22:11
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: CYWH (Victoria)
Posts: 5,519
Thanks Democritus,

I sent the BBC link to a friend of mine who was in AUAS in the 50s.

He was delighted. Flew the two in the foreground and actually went solo in WD364.
India Four Two is offline  
Old 6th Mar 2017, 07:17
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: London
Posts: 1,263
Keeping straight after touchdown could be exciting in a Chippie when landing on a runway. Grass was much easier.
4Greens is offline  
Old 6th Mar 2017, 13:16
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 584
Thanks Discorde. Happy memories of OUAS in the 60s. I don't recall the Trappers being too tough on us, but your document would have put the wind up me!

Laurence
l.garey is offline  
Old 6th Mar 2017, 13:39
  #8 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 1999
Location: SEUK
Age: 73
Posts: 641
The LUAS CO was S/L Robbie Chambers (ex-Meteors IIRC), CFI F/L Dick Kidney (ex-Canberras, IIRC he won the Sword of Honour at Cranwell, sent me solo), Deputy CFI F/L Steve Holding (ex-Shacks, taught me how to land the Chippie). Other instructors were Bill Morris (flew Spitfires during the war), Don Merriman and Carl Mason.

Other memories: per diem Training Emolument: 32/6; Summer Camp Bounty 30; lunch in the Officers' Mess at Church Fenton: 4/6.
Discorde is offline  
Old 6th Mar 2017, 22:40
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: CYWH (Victoria)
Posts: 5,519
Discorde,

4/6d was stuck in my mind too, but I remembered it as the per diem cost of living in the OM.

Virtually unlimited Chipmunk flying was the main attraction of going to Shawbury for the weekend, but almost as important, was the very good food.

Looking back, it is hard to believe how lucky we UAS cadets were in those days. We got paid to fly and there was no pressure to join up. One of my CFIs told me that they were not allowed to suggest joining the RAF! I decide not to join, for various reasons, but the CFS standardized training I received has stood me in very good stead over the years.

It's such a shame that the UAS system is a mere shadow of its former self. It looks like an adventure training scheme with some flying thrown in.

PS For you youngsters, 4/6d (22.5p) was about the price of one gallon (4.5 litres) of petrol

Last edited by India Four Two; 7th Mar 2017 at 02:55.
India Four Two is offline  
Old 6th Mar 2017, 23:12
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Kent
Posts: 15
Democritus; I also was lucky to fly in the AUAS Chipmunks photographed in the 1960's article. I achieved about 150 hours while at University. Now I have to pay for my flying out of my own pocket. Mearns Loon
Mearns Loon is offline  
Old 8th Mar 2017, 01:08
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Blighty (Nth. Downs)
Age: 74
Posts: 2,109
Okay for some...

You lucky so-and-soes...

Quotes:
"I achieved about 150 hours while at University."

That's about the same as the time I got on singles for my CPL at Scone** in the 1960s. But not on Chippies...
And I had to pay a quarter of the 7/10/- per-hour back over five years.

"Now I have to pay for my flying out of my own pocket."

Something about a "peace dividend", so now we can prop-up foreign despots instead?


**
(see my thread, which includes a photo of UAS Chipmunks)
Chris Scott is offline  
Old 10th Mar 2017, 18:14
  #12 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: UK
Posts: 3,334
Very good! And none of that RAF handling notes nonsense (which the RAF rightly ignored) of setting brake before landing - just a note to be prepared to use it after landing if needed.
Shaggy Sheep Driver is offline  
Old 10th Mar 2017, 18:46
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Reading, UK
Posts: 12,490
Somewhere in a box in the attic I have my late uncle's logbook from his time with Edinburgh UAS.

I remember being delighted to find that one of the Chippies had subsequently ended up with 12 AEF, also at Turnhouse, and that I'd flown in it several times as a schoolboy CCF cadet.
DaveReidUK is offline  
Old 10th Mar 2017, 20:12
  #14 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: CYWH (Victoria)
Posts: 5,519
Well there's a first time for everything! I have to differ with my friend SSD.

In my time at Shawbury, we followed the 1966 T10 Pilot's Notes* including the "My Friend Fred..." mnemonic. :





Usually no brakes on landing, but we used three notches of brake in cross winds. Our "local orders" were a 7 kt limit. The Boss was very protective of his aircraft and didn't want to risk hamfisted students bending them in strong cross winds!

Incidentally, I found the "kicking off the drift" method very difficult and it wasn't until a Canadian instructor taught me the "wing down in the flare, land on one main wheel" technique, that I became comfortable with cross wind landings.

* I've mentioned this before, but I have a zip file with an extensive collection of Chipmunk documents. Free for the asking.
India Four Two is offline  
Old 10th Mar 2017, 21:25
  #15 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Sywell
Posts: 50
Great thread. Thanks for sharing your memories. I hope you don't mind me directing members of the Facebook group, the 'de Havilland Chipmunk Appreciation Society' to this.

Do come on over and join us. We are a happy blend of Chipmunk owners operators, enthusiasts, vintage cadets and air traffickers.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/2397931999/
Chipmunk Janie is offline  
Old 10th Mar 2017, 21:50
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Australia
Posts: 879
Originally Posted by India Four Two View Post
Well there's a first time for everything! I have to differ with my friend SSD.

In my time at Shawbury, we followed the 1966 T10 Pilot's Notes* including the "My Friend Fred..." mnemonic. :





Usually no brakes on landing, but we used three notches of brake in cross winds. Our "local orders" were a 7 kt limit. The Boss was very protective of his aircraft and didn't want to risk hamfisted students bending them in strong cross winds!

Incidentally, I found the "kicking off the drift" method very difficult and it wasn't until a Canadian instructor taught me the "wing down in the flare, land on one main wheel" technique, that I became comfortable with cross wind landings.

* I've mentioned this before, but I have a zip file with an extensive collection of Chipmunk documents. Free for the asking.
India Four Two.
PM sent re zip file.

Thomas
rjtjrt is offline  
Old 11th Mar 2017, 02:42
  #17 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Australia
Age: 69
Posts: 372
Loved my chippy. Even when the engine stopped and had to do a dead stick landing on a golf course.

Turned out to be a great day. It was ladies day and being an unmarried 30 year old was hosted to lunch.

The afternoon taxied around to the par 5 hole after the engineers had been and took off

As a PS my first tail wheel endorsement was in a Lockheed 12A at 120hours TT
dhavillandpilot is offline  
Old 11th Mar 2017, 11:57
  #18 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: nicolalaland
Posts: 128
Crosswind limits 7 knots solo, 15 knots dual, but despite what PNs said Rissie also taught QFIs to use wing down: 'Someday you're going to get caught out, so just in case . . . . '
binbrook is offline  
Old 11th Mar 2017, 12:22
  #19 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 1999
Location: SEUK
Age: 73
Posts: 641
We were taught the crab technique at CF. I remember once rejoining from a solo detail to discover a crosswind had sprung up. Called downwind and did MFFHHB, ending with 'Brakes . . . off', as always. But then a helpful (unidentified) voice said, "couple of notches of brake, Lima Five Two?" I set the brakes accordingly - good advice!
Discorde is offline  
Old 11th Mar 2017, 18:17
  #20 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: UK
Posts: 3,334
I set the brakes accordingly - good advice!
Only for a low-houred pilot, and even then I'm not convinced. In 35 years of Chippying and zero ground loops I found nothing to contradict:

1) Brakes fully off allows full rudder movement. You might need it!

2) Landing with brake set is inviting a swing as you push rudder and get brake you don't need!

3) If you do need brake, you'll already have full appropriate rudder on, so just tweak on the brake lever with your little finger as required.

Why on earth would you set brake before you need it?
Shaggy Sheep Driver is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.