Aviation History and Nostalgia Whether working in aviation, retired, wannabee or just plain fascinated this forum welcomes all with a love of flight.

Lympne.

Old 6th Apr 2012, 01:43
  #1 (permalink)  
GQ2
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: UK
Posts: 146
Lympne.

During the 1930's, Lympne had been a thriving airfield and had hosted many meetings, trials and air-races. Private Civil flying was banned upon the outbreak of war in 1939. On the 15th August 1940, the airfield was attacked by the Luftwaffe and the hangars destroyed. Although some civil a/c had been evacuated to Sywell and other locations, many aircraft were destroyed inside Lympne's burning hangars.

I'm looking for photos taken at Lympne airfield in the 1939 - 1940 period, in particular which show resident a/c, especially in the hangars. I'm also especially interested in any images of the damaged hangars after the German raid of 15th August.

Any photos or leads to them would be much appreciated.

Last edited by GQ2; 6th Apr 2012 at 11:09. Reason: Corrected date and added line.
GQ2 is offline  
Old 27th Apr 2012, 22:27
  #2 (permalink)  
GQ2
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: UK
Posts: 146
Question Booiinggg...

Any photos taken at Lympne just before the War...? Especially the resident a/c...?
GQ2 is offline  
Old 29th Apr 2012, 12:13
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: east ESSEX
Posts: 3,132
Try a search on Flightglobal archives...
sycamore is online now  
Old 30th Apr 2012, 10:59
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: River Thames & Surrey
Age: 70
Posts: 8,084
Two 'elderly gentlemen' returning from a visit to a French airfield in a non-radio aircraft, with the intention of refuelling at Lympne. Crossing the channel, they were discussing how to pronounce the name 'Lympne'. They couldn't agree, but decided to ask the refueller when they landed.
They duly landed and re-fuelled then asked the re-fueller the question.

He looked at them in rather a puzzled way and said 'Shoreham'!

I'm told this is a true story; I'm sure I read it in Pilot magazine about 30 years ago.
chevvron is offline  
Old 30th Apr 2012, 11:21
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Bedford
Posts: 412
Best book is "Lympne Airport" in old photographs by David G. Collyer ,1992 by Alan Sutton Publishing Ltd Phoenix Mill,Stroud,Gloucs, A softback book 60 pages retails at 7:99p.
On page 104 there is an aerial view of the aftermath of the bombing raid.
T-21 is offline  
Old 13th Jul 2012, 21:57
  #6 (permalink)  
GQ2
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: UK
Posts: 146
Lympne Damage.

T-21;- Thanks for that. I have had that book for some years, but I'm really looking for closer detail of the damage etc.
The wartime magazines were not really allowed to show damage.
Perhaps there are some other books....
GQ2 is offline  
Old 13th Jul 2012, 22:28
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: New South Wales
Posts: 8,750
I'm looking for photos taken at Lympne airfield in the 1939 - 1940 period, in particular which show resident a/c, especially in the hangars
I was going to try this photo in What Aerodrome a while back, until I discovered Lympne had already been covered.
Unfortunately it is captioned as 1926. Possibly illustrated in the book above?

Noyade is offline  
Old 16th Jul 2012, 00:49
  #8 (permalink)  
GQ2
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: UK
Posts: 146
Lympne.

Thanks for that! The date looks about right, judging by the ladies fashions. What smart hangars, I wonder how old they were at that time...? (The hangars I mean...)
GQ2 is offline  
Old 16th Jul 2012, 04:24
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Somewhere under the rainbow
Posts: 121
My wife recently bought me a copy of Detling Airfield - A history 1915-1959 which was published last year by Amberley Publishing and written by Anthony J Moor. Given the relative proximity to Lympne, the author might have some info that might be useful.
lenhamlad is offline  
Old 21st Jun 2017, 08:53
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Luton
Posts: 506
My only visits to Lympne (Ashford) were in May 1969. Does anyone have any aerodrome charts for this period? i.e. after the tarmac runway was built. Thanks for any help.
cj241101 is offline  
Old 21st Jun 2017, 09:39
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: LOndon UK
Age: 75
Posts: 9
"Two 'elderly gentlemen' returning from a visit to a French airfield in a non-radio aircraft, with the intention of refuelling at Lympne. Crossing the channel, they were discussing how to pronounce the name 'Lympne'. They couldn't agree, but decided to ask the refueller when they landed.
They duly landed and re-fuelled then asked the re-fueller the question.

He looked at them in rather a puzzled way and said 'Shoreham'!"

The one I heard was a wartime american bomber limping home and deciding to land at Lympne and as they taxied in asking the same question to a man cutting the grass and getting the answer "Manston".
RLinSW4 is offline  
Old 21st Jun 2017, 10:58
  #12 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Penzance, Cornwall UK
Age: 79
Posts: 32
Yes, yes and yes again - but how should Lympne be pronounced?
Rosevidney1 is offline  
Old 21st Jun 2017, 11:24
  #13 (permalink)  
Gnome de PPRuNe
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Too close to Croydon for comfort
Age: 55
Posts: 5,631
"Lim" is how I always understood it to be pronounced.
treadigraph is offline  
Old 21st Jun 2017, 11:51
  #14 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: River Thames & Surrey
Age: 70
Posts: 8,084
Originally Posted by cj241101 View Post
My only visits to Lympne (Ashford) were in May 1969. Does anyone have any aerodrome charts for this period? i.e. after the tarmac runway was built. Thanks for any help.
Shortly after this it was re-named 'London/Ashford'.
Skyways coach/air ran '748s from Lympne to Paris (Beauvais) and were regulars on London Info, as were the Carvairs on the Southend - Rotterdam services of BAF(?) when I was an assistant at West Drayton from Mar '69 to Sep '71.
I think Skyways were taken over by Dan Air in 1972 who terminated the service in 1974 and regretfully, Lympne was officially closed to commercial operations although it was still used by some private aircraft until 1984 (according to Wiki) and in the early 80s, Pat Luscombe based his developments of the Luscombe 'Rattler' and similar types of microlights there.

Last edited by chevvron; 21st Jun 2017 at 12:06.
chevvron is offline  
Old 21st Jun 2017, 18:26
  #15 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Penzance, Cornwall UK
Age: 79
Posts: 32
Thank you, treadigraph. I rather thought that might be the case, but it's nice to have confirmation.
Rosevidney1 is offline  
Old 22nd Jun 2017, 16:48
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hertfordshire
Posts: 351
Originally Posted by treadigraph View Post
"Lim" is how I always understood it to be pronounced.
I've known both "lim" and "lime" and this limerick seems evidence for the latter:

There was an old fellow of Lympne
Who married three wives at one tympne.
When asked "why the third?"
He replied "one's absurd,
And bigamy, sir, is a crympne."
Allan Lupton is offline  
Old 22nd Jun 2017, 17:49
  #17 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hertfordshire
Posts: 351
But:
There was an old fellow of Lympne,
Who said "How I wish I was slympne!"
So he lived for two weeks
On a nut and two leeks
And that was the last heard of hympne.
Allan Lupton is offline  
Old 22nd Jun 2017, 17:54
  #18 (permalink)  
Gnome de PPRuNe
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Too close to Croydon for comfort
Age: 55
Posts: 5,631
Brilliant! Thanks Allan!

We are all agreed it's not Limp Knee (of which I have two...)
treadigraph is offline  
Old 22nd Jun 2017, 19:58
  #19 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Bolton ENGLAND
Age: 74
Posts: 906
Limp-knee.....!!!! LOL

Last edited by Planemike; 30th Jun 2017 at 18:18.
Planemike is offline  
Old 30th Jun 2017, 16:41
  #20 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: UK
Posts: 425
Didn't Skyways manage to land a 748 upside down at Lympne? A Sunday evening if I recall and caused by a strong gust under the port [?] wing at a critical moment. If I remember correctly a National newspaper photograph gave a whole new meaning to 'strap-hanging'! Sometime mid 1960s?

No serious injuries if I seem to recall.
H49
Helen49 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.