PPRuNe Forums

PPRuNe Forums (https://www.pprune.org/)
-   Australia, New Zealand & the Pacific (https://www.pprune.org/australia-new-zealand-pacific-90/)
-   -   Airnorth future? Bristow in financial trouble (https://www.pprune.org/australia-new-zealand-pacific/620752-airnorth-future-bristow-financial-trouble.html)

belly tank 3rd May 2019 14:00

As predicted Airnorth is on the chopping block.

https://www.flightglobal.com/news/ar...ow-res-457851/

Icarus2001 3rd May 2019 16:00


Key assets for disposal include Airnorth and Eastern Airways, based in Australia and the UK respectively, which are both forecast to be negative on earnings before (EBTIDA)
Well there is the answer to the statement above that Air North is profitable. Negative earnings even before tax and interest.

industry insider 3rd May 2019 16:22

Bristow is about to close it’s Broome base next week as it has finished flying for Inpex after the contract was terminated. In terms of 2014 levels of aircraft (30 now 3) pilots and engineers (140 now 16 each) it’s now 10% of its 2014 size.

Pavement 3rd May 2019 22:22



How do you know this? Air North makes a small profit, do you have a source? Or is it "the vibe"?[/QUOTE]

Will Bristows own statement suffice? The vibe about this operation has been around for a while.

ersa 4th May 2019 07:18

3 S92 are about to turn up for a contract in Port Hedland WA, they were marking the taxi ways out 2 weeks ago

rep 4th May 2019 07:39

I think the thing to remember here is that Airnorth has been very profitable in the past. They have only started loosing money since Bristow came on board. I have no doubt money has been shifted overseas. At the end of the day, they are a helicopter company attempting to run a fixed wing business - it was never going to work. The sooner they get MB back onboard, the better. Together we try.

Duck Pilot 4th May 2019 07:43

Pretty sure any contract with an oil and gas producer will have clauses in it to ensure the client doesn’t loose out.

Stationair8 4th May 2019 08:20

Word on the street is that MB, is about to go on the board of CASA.

Scooter Rassmussin 4th May 2019 08:21

Watch Qantas Link make a move !

belly tank 4th May 2019 09:42


Originally Posted by ersa (Post 10462474)
3 S92 are about to turn up for a contract in Port Hedland WA, they were marking the taxi ways out 2 weeks ago

Its only short term contract 6-9 months.

Duck Pilot 4th May 2019 12:50

QantasLink move in with what? Their own fleet or take the existing TL fleet over?

industry insider 5th May 2019 12:23

ersa


3 S92 are about to turn up for a contract in Port Hedland WA, they were marking the taxi ways out 2 weeks ago
Same Santos drilling contract they have been supporting contract as Bristow has been supporting from Karratha, 2x S-92s. Bristow has 5 in country now, 3 are heading to the North Sea.

Pavement

The recent Bristow 10Q flings have shown Air North to be making a small loss, profit or loss is highly dependent on the fuel price.

The whole idea was to buy airlines (Eastern in the UK and Air North in Australia) and to control the whole travel supply chain for the offshore oil and gas workforce. But in Australia, Bristow customers didn't buy it, in fact, they are very adverse to having one logistics transport supplier. Bristow canvassed their customers and the reaction was negative.

But one or two management types in Bristow had delusions of grandeur and with the cash rolling in at that time from helicopter operations, they went ahead and did it anyway. After the purchase, Bristow didn't actually try to make the tie up with the helicopter contracts so Air North was always going to be a stepchild. They installed a "tea bag and toilet paper sheet counting" finance type as Air North CEO who had briefly held a position in Bristow as Service Delivery Manager. He was moved to Air North because the Bristow Helicopter customers neither liked the service nor the Manager.

WannaBeBiggles 5th May 2019 21:19


Originally Posted by industry insider (Post 10463476)
They installed a "tea bag and toilet paper sheet counting" finance type as Air North CEO who had briefly held a position in Bristow as Service Delivery Manager. He was moved to Air North because the Bristow Helicopter customers neither liked the service nor the Manager.

If it's the person that is still CEO at AN now, then that individual is also CEO of Bristow Australia.

Bend alot 6th May 2019 06:43


Originally Posted by Stationair8 (Post 10462513)
Word on the street is that MB, is about to go on the board of CASA.

Good I've got photos!

Zhoottoo 7th May 2019 01:40


Originally Posted by Stationair8 (Post 10462513)
Word on the street is that MB, is about to go on the board of CASA.

CASA website says:

Mr Michael Bridge

First appointed: 1 October 2018


industry insider 7th May 2019 10:46

WaanBeBiggles


If it's the person that is still CEO at AN now, then that individual is also CEO of Bristow Australia.
Same one. Ex Finance Manager Bristow, Head of Bristow Travel where he honed his tea bag counting and toilet paper rationing skills. After a brief spell as Bristow Service Delivery Manager, a new concept introduced by the then Bristow Australia CEO but which lasted only weeks, the purchase of Air North provided a promotion opportunity which also conveniently moved him away from the important oil and gas clients.

The Bristow Financial Year ends in April. Between April 2017 and April 2018 (latest figures not yet available) Bristow (mostly) and Air North lost $31,776,293 between them in Australia alone.

WannaBeBiggles 7th May 2019 22:04


Originally Posted by industry insider (Post 10465241)
The Bristow Financial Year ends in April. Between April 2017 and April 2018 (latest figures not yet available) Bristow (mostly) and Air North lost $31,776,293 between them in Australia alone.

From memory AirNorth accounted for less than $2mil of that loss, roughly the cost of only one second hand CF34-8E from the sandpit. How many new engines did AN need in the last FY? So if it weren't for that, it wouldn't be a stretch to argue the company is a profitable entity..


PCAU 8th May 2019 18:01


Originally Posted by WannaBeBiggles (Post 10465740)
From memory AirNorth accounted for less than $2mil of that loss, roughly the cost of only one second hand CF34-8E from the sandpit. How many new engines did AN need in the last FY? So if it weren't for that, it wouldn't be a stretch to argue the company is a profitable entity..

Quite right Biggles, a quick perusal of Bristows reports reveals the following “Historical Fixed-Wing Performance” for AirNorth:

FY15: EBITDA $0.7m (1Q Only)
FY16: EBITDA $12.4m (No Loss Making Qs)
FY17: EBITDA $8.9m (No Loss Making Qs)
FY18: EBITDA $7.2m (Q4 Loss of $1.4m)
FY19: EBITDA -$1.6m (Q1 Profit of $0.2m)

rep 9th May 2019 00:14

As I said previously, Airnorth has been a very profitable company. It's just being run by monkeys at the moment.

Icarus2001 9th May 2019 04:25

Great, their EBITDA figures are not too bad. What about after they have paid their bills? My earnings before tax are pretty good too but those dollars are useless in the real world as I cannot spend them.

EBITDA. Earnings BEFORE interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation.

PCAU 9th May 2019 05:17


Originally Posted by Icarus2001 (Post 10466788)
Great, their EBITDA figures are not too bad. What about after they have paid their bills? My earnings before tax are pretty good too but those dollars are useless in the real world as I cannot spend them.

EBITDA. Earnings BEFORE interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation.

Well obviously the corporate tax rate for the Australian entity is a flat 30%, however this is only applied after deducting the NON-CASH expenses of Depreciation and Amortisation, resulting in an effective lowering of the tax rate payable. Of course the wild card is the Interest component which is Interest Income - Interest Expense, so depending on their cash at bank vs cash loans/drawn credit facilities it could be a plus or minus. Remembering that operational leases such as for aircraft and equipment are categorised as direct expenses and the interest component is rarely separated, hence my distinction that it only relates Cash Loan facilities.

Therefore, after D and A and even accounting for some I, they probably paid next to no tax and got to keep most all of the cash actually!

PCAU 10th May 2019 06:59

The big question remains whether or not they will look to sell, or if Bristow would like to try and retain AirNorth (and Eastern for that matter) when/if they go through the Chapter 11 process?

The airline doesn’t seem a natural fit for any of the incumbents, save MAYBE for Alliance, but even then not really... Maybe the most likely option would be Private Capital or another adjacent operator (like Bristow were).

belly tank 11th May 2019 21:28

Bristow files for CH11

Bristow Group Inc. - Home

VH DSJ 11th May 2019 22:54


Originally Posted by belly tank (Post 10469218)
Bristow files for CH11

Bristow Group Inc. - Home


That statement says "Filings Include Certain U.S. Entities and Cayman Islands Subsidiaries; All Other Non-U.S. Entities Excluded from Filings ...
Bristow's other non-U.S. entities, including those holding Bristow's non-U.S. air operating certificates ("AOCs"), are not included in the Chapter 11 filings."

By that, let's hope it means Air North is still operating tomorrow. Can anyone confirm?

Hasherucf 12th May 2019 01:32


Originally Posted by VH DSJ (Post 10469261)
That statement says "Filings Include Certain U.S. Entities and Cayman Islands Subsidiaries; All Other Non-U.S. Entities Excluded from Filings ...
Bristow's other non-U.S. entities, including those holding Bristow's non-U.S. air operating certificates ("AOCs"), are not included in the Chapter 11 filings."

By that, let's hope it means Air North is still operating tomorrow. Can anyone confirm?


Business as usual at Airnorth

PCAU 12th May 2019 08:05

It’s business as usual for the whole of Bristow at this stage... Chapter 11 “Bankruptcy” Protection in the US is much like ‘Administration’ for a company in Aus, with one Main difference being that the standing management retain control, not an external advisor. It basically just stops financiers from being able to pull the ripcord and they can threaten liquidation as the alternative to force renegotiated loans/equity swaps etc. (which is the bit shareholders don’t want as it can seriously weaken their existing holdings by the banks taking a massive chunk of new shares in exchange for wiping the debt. In some historic cases it’s rendered existing stockholders’ stake from 100% to effectively less than 1%) Who knows what deal they will strike but those bankers can ask for assets or other things to be divested as part of the deal, which may force their hand and see the fixed-wings sold off, I highly doubt they would let them collapse.


All times are GMT. The time now is 19:29.


Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.