Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > PPRuNe Worldwide > Australia, New Zealand & the Pacific
Reload this Page >

Reputation of Aussie pilots overseas

Australia, New Zealand & the Pacific Airline and RPT Rumours & News in Australia, enZed and the Pacific

Reputation of Aussie pilots overseas

Old 5th Feb 2018, 10:09
  #41 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: N/A
Posts: 279
Originally Posted by pilotchute View Post
Once upon a time when the Q still flew to Frankfurt, my wife pressed the call button and asked the flight attendant for some water. She was told that the call button was only for emergencies and she could get up and go the galley herself if she wanted water.

"The crew on Emirates don't mind getting me water" was the response. CC stomped off and came back with water.

Thats the last time we flew Q long haul.

I have had a similar response to CC on Q....

My last booking with Q was only made as I had no other alternative for the day I had to travel. I even looked at non direct flights to avoid booking with Q.
schweizer2 is offline  
Old 5th Feb 2018, 10:26
  #42 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Australia
Posts: 31
More to the point, what's the reputation of Aussie pilots in Australia?
michigan j is offline  
Old 5th Feb 2018, 10:33
  #43 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Australia/India
Posts: 2,837
But Qantas is the world’s safest airline, Australia has an enviable aviation safety record and Australia ‘punches above its weight’ in international fora.

I hope you’re not suggesting that this is all a consequence of the statistically insignificant number of hours that Australian aircraft fly, luck and money spent on diplomatic schmoozing? Surely not.
Lead Balloon is offline  
Old 5th Feb 2018, 10:35
  #44 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: uk
Posts: 16
have found several to be your best mate in the bar and then the most pedantic individuals on the flight deck.
also seem to have lots of pent up frustration,far removed from the ficticious,easy going Aussie stereotype
Baltic Skies is offline  
Old 5th Feb 2018, 10:40
  #45 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: NSW
Posts: 241
I think its the " little man, little dick " syndrome and coming from such a little aviation community!
TBM-Legend is offline  
Old 5th Feb 2018, 11:12
  #46 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Australia
Posts: 345
I flew one of the gulf carriers several years ago. Was woken by a poke to the shoulder and a rough Eastern European accent:

“You vont juice”

Still not sure if it was a question.
ruprecht is offline  
Old 5th Feb 2018, 11:18
  #47 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: D(Emona)
Age: 39
Posts: 380
Is it true that in Qantas it is forbidden for FO and SO to call captain by the first name?
Dufo is online now  
Old 5th Feb 2018, 11:22
  #48 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Australia
Posts: 345
Originally Posted by Dufo View Post
Is it true that in Qantas it is forbidden for FO and SO to call captain by the first name?
Nope!

...anyone else wanna pile on, or are we done here?
ruprecht is offline  
Old 5th Feb 2018, 11:26
  #49 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: FNQ ... Still!
Posts: 3,383
So we’ve gone from Aussie bashing, to Ansett bashing, now Qantas bashing. Who’s next?
The mods must be enjoying this thread, they haven’t shut it down yet!
Capt Fathom is online now  
Old 5th Feb 2018, 14:06
  #50 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: M.I.A.
Posts: 130
If it’s being pendantic to comply with SID/STAR level/speed restrictions, MSA/MORAs, readback requirements, SOPs in general, etc, etc then paint me in Vegemite and call me an Austronaut. I’ll wear that epithet with pride.
Bug Smasher Smasher is offline  
Old 5th Feb 2018, 15:17
  #51 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: 3rd rock from the sun
Posts: 1,605
I agree with the last post.

I am easy going in the cockpit if the other crew member can show me that they’re not going to blatantly ignore SOP’s (I understand some differences in interpretation sometimes, so even if they are within the realms of the SOP’s and are safe, I don’t care, I’m sure I am in the same boat some days) and that they have some idea WTF they’re doing.

When I start being difficult and perhaps probably even referred to as an ‘austronaut’, is when the other crew member really doesn’t have a clue what the hell they’re doing, is blatantly disregarding SOP’s and rules, and is just being an all round ****!

Unfortunately I have come across the latter more overseas than I have in Australia. At the end of the day, I want to go home to my family and not have to fill out incident reports because I was afraid of being called an Austronaut.

Funnily enough some of the best pilots I’ve flown with have been Mexican guys. Professional, yet so relaxed. Makes the cockpit an enjoyable place.

morno
morno is offline  
Old 5th Feb 2018, 15:39
  #52 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: NQLD
Age: 33
Posts: 96
Thanks for all the great responses guys!

I can’t say so far I’ve experienced flying with one of these guys so far, just endless negative comments about Aussies referring to some grumpy old Captains.

I agree with the comments regarding following SOP’s properly and getting home safe. I have no hesitation to tell the other guy to pull his/her head in. On that note I’ve heard many positive comments regarding Aussies in this manner, we just get straight to the point! 👍

Having experienced an airline going bankrupt myself (much smaller than Ansett), the feeling of being ripped off or ‘that’s not how we did things at xxxx’ isn’t confined to ex Ansett guys.
aviation_enthus is offline  
Old 5th Feb 2018, 18:40
  #53 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: U.S.A
Age: 51
Posts: 410
A recent event here in the US highlighted to me the difference between ozmates and the rest of the world maybe?

This is merely an observation, not a criticism; I see both sides of the story on this issue.

We had just landed in LAX where the wind on the ATIS was a light westerly of several knots, typical Socally evening.

The actual wind on final to touchdown was a northerly of 30 knots, all crosswind and VERY rare for LAX. The skipper was driving and greased it on, no problem.

We parked at the gate turning around to then push east on our redeye and I had left ground freq monitored for some reason.

The wind strength had not abated but become slightly easterly in direction resulting in about . . . . 3-4 knots tailwind component. The ATIS had been updated to reflect this.

First up, a Virgin Oz 777 bound for SYD called up and advised that owing to the slight tailwind component, they would be requiring an easterly departure. The ground controller after several confirmations and explanations then agreed that an easterly departure was required by Virgin however the delay would be very long, maybe over an hour from memory.

It appears that the Virgin crew twiddled the numbers and found that the rig could actually get airborne to the west with 3-4 knots up the date and off they went.

Then came the Qantas 744 bound for oz. Same deal, same request, same response by ground. They too discovered that 3-4 knots of tailwind is preferable to hours of delay and off they went.

I just found it so striking that of the huge number of departures that evening during our turnaround and during the time of the Virgin/Qantas conversation, dozens of other long haul wide bodies headed off with the tailwind component as advertised without so much as a peep from the crew.

As for ex blue shirters, I am one and yes there is a lot of “this is how we did it in AN”. But guess what, that comes from every large group of pilots following mass migration from airline to airline. I have heard the same from pilots ex Braniff, Monarch, Midlands, USAir, Frontier etc.
oicur12.again is offline  
Old 5th Feb 2018, 19:03
  #54 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Western Europe
Posts: 169
Taxing along in LHR last week I heard an excited and somewhat vexed antipodean voice calling out ATC over some minor stop bar issue twice, seemed to be from a CX. ATC man calmly informed him that the verbal clearance had overall priority in any case. No biggie, it just seemed an over the top reaction in a very well controlled airport but I couldn't help thinking what a long flight that must have been for the other mortal pilot.
Consol is offline  
Old 5th Feb 2018, 20:18
  #55 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: The Ponderosa
Age: 47
Posts: 801
10 out of 10 to the VA and QF crews for ‘calling out common sense’ in the first instance. For me it has everything right about it, taking lead, absolute standards, versatility etc.

Sure we might seem like a pain in the arse but this is what keeps us off the covers of crash comics.

Regards, hoss
hoss is offline  
Old 5th Feb 2018, 20:35
  #56 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: 41S174E
Age: 52
Posts: 2,767
ATC man calmly informed him that the verbal clearance had overall priority in any case.
It’s easy to understand why this conversation occurred though. In Australia the verbal clearance doesn’t override the stop bars so the pilot concerned may have had one of those moments where you really want to remove ambiguity..... which it probably did.....job done.
framer is offline  
Old 5th Feb 2018, 21:44
  #57 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Western Europe
Posts: 169
Originally Posted by framer View Post
It’s easy to understand why this conversation occurred though. In Australia the verbal clearance doesn’t override the stop bars so the pilot concerned may have had one of those moments where you really want to remove ambiguity..... which it probably did.....job done.
Fair point but he was in LHR not SYD and seemed very loudly worked up about it on air. Could have just queried the bars normally like the rest of us.
Consol is offline  
Old 6th Feb 2018, 00:10
  #58 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Sydney
Age: 56
Posts: 1,545
You think the distance to be flown to Oz, therefore the max weight take-off near limits might have something to do with it!
I am a little suprised by the 744, after all, they are on overtime!

Originally Posted by oicur12.again View Post
A recent event here in the US highlighted to me the difference between ozmates and the rest of the world maybe?

This is merely an observation, not a criticism; I see both sides of the story on this issue.

We had just landed in LAX where the wind on the ATIS was a light westerly of several knots, typical Socally evening.

The actual wind on final to touchdown was a northerly of 30 knots, all crosswind and VERY rare for LAX. The skipper was driving and greased it on, no problem.

We parked at the gate turning around to then push east on our redeye and I had left ground freq monitored for some reason.

The wind strength had not abated but become slightly easterly in direction resulting in about . . . . 3-4 knots tailwind component. The ATIS had been updated to reflect this.

First up, a Virgin Oz 777 bound for SYD called up and advised that owing to the slight tailwind component, they would be requiring an easterly departure. The ground controller after several confirmations and explanations then agreed that an easterly departure was required by Virgin however the delay would be very long, maybe over an hour from memory.

It appears that the Virgin crew twiddled the numbers and found that the rig could actually get airborne to the west with 3-4 knots up the date and off they went.

Then came the Qantas 744 bound for oz. Same deal, same request, same response by ground. They too discovered that 3-4 knots of tailwind is preferable to hours of delay and off they went.

I just found it so striking that of the huge number of departures that evening during our turnaround and during the time of the Virgin/Qantas conversation, dozens of other long haul wide bodies headed off with the tailwind component as advertised without so much as a peep from the crew.

As for ex blue shirters, I am one and yes there is a lot of “this is how we did it in AN”. But guess what, that comes from every large group of pilots following mass migration from airline to airline. I have heard the same from pilots ex Braniff, Monarch, Midlands, USAir, Frontier etc.
Tankengine is offline  
Old 6th Feb 2018, 00:25
  #59 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Asia
Posts: 550
If I’m cleared to cross red stop bars, I want it on the tape just in case so I will query the instruction.
krismiler is offline  
Old 6th Feb 2018, 00:31
  #60 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 142
Originally Posted by oicur12.again View Post
A recent event here in the US highlighted to me the difference between ozmates and the rest of the world maybe?

This is merely an observation, not a criticism; I see both sides of the story on this issue.

We had just landed in LAX where the wind on the ATIS was a light westerly of several knots, typical Socally evening.

The actual wind on final to touchdown was a northerly of 30 knots, all crosswind and VERY rare for LAX. The skipper was driving and greased it on, no problem.

We parked at the gate turning around to then push east on our redeye and I had left ground freq monitored for some reason.

The wind strength had not abated but become slightly easterly in direction resulting in about . . . . 3-4 knots tailwind component. The ATIS had been updated to reflect this.

First up, a Virgin Oz 777 bound for SYD called up and advised that owing to the slight tailwind component, they would be requiring an easterly departure. The ground controller after several confirmations and explanations then agreed that an easterly departure was required by Virgin however the delay would be very long, maybe over an hour from memory.

It appears that the Virgin crew twiddled the numbers and found that the rig could actually get airborne to the west with 3-4 knots up the date and off they went.

Then came the Qantas 744 bound for oz. Same deal, same request, same response by ground. They too discovered that 3-4 knots of tailwind is preferable to hours of delay and off they went.

I just found it so striking that of the huge number of departures that evening during our turnaround and during the time of the Virgin/Qantas conversation, dozens of other long haul wide bodies headed off with the tailwind component as advertised without so much as a peep from the crew.

As for ex blue shirters, I am one and yes there is a lot of “this is how we did it in AN”. But guess what, that comes from every large group of pilots following mass migration from airline to airline. I have heard the same from pilots ex Braniff, Monarch, Midlands, USAir, Frontier etc.
At what point does LAX ATC decide tailwinds are for the birds and they ought to turn the airport around and face it into the wind?
Pearly White is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.