Australia, New Zealand & the Pacific Airline and RPT Rumours & News in Australia, enZed and the Pacific

PNG crash near Kiunga??

Old 14th Apr 2016, 08:06
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by The Ancient Geek View Post
The company oprates BN-2 Islanders.
How do they get 12 bodies from a 10 seat aircraft ?.
In Oz in the 70s I used to fly with a bush pilot in a Cessna 6 seater tail-dragger which he'd previously operated for a while in New Guinea. It was equipped with an under-slung luggage pod. He told me that quite frequently this pod was occupied by two local fellas in addition to a full cabin.
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Old 14th Apr 2016, 09:29
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The terrain around Kiunga is relatively flat
But riven by small gulleys and creeks... corrugated rather than flat ... few places for an emergency landing
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Old 14th Apr 2016, 11:00
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I really hope the operator can get through this tragic event. Very professional operation managed by a couple of highly experienced PNG pilots who have a real heart for the PNG rural communities.
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Old 15th Apr 2016, 11:30
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Andy Parr wasn't Avdev he was Talair P2 ISG...not Hindenberg wall..
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Old 15th Apr 2016, 11:42
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12 in an Islander (Brumm Brumm) is no big deal. Haven't operated in PNG since the early '80s but it would have been unusual then not to have high density seating. Thats 4 rows of 3 abreast bench seating plus front right seat and legal to have a babe (picaniny) in arms. For a child it was legal to have two of them in one seat belt. Do the maths. That was a lot of kanakas on board and all legal. Just make sure they are all strapped in and weight OK and you are good to go.
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Old 17th Apr 2016, 05:43
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Sorri Tumas
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Old 17th Apr 2016, 06:20
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Devil

I know of someone who crammed just over 20 POB into a 'brumm brumm' many years ago.

All Schoolkids, heading home at end of term.

'Aint sayin' who it was.
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Old 17th Apr 2016, 20:26
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The good old days of overloading these non performing twins should be a thing of the past, even in places such as PNG. There are plenty of alternatives, with the most simplest one being do two trips instead of one.

Let's just wait and see what the report brings out.

This isn't the place to bring out old war stories, use the other PNG tok tok thread.
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Old 17th Apr 2016, 21:02
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Duck Pilot, nobody here has posted or described anything suggesting overloading. The discussions are about how many pax can be carried within the capabilities of the aircraft. 11 PNGians, including a couple of kids, is well within the limitations of an Islander. I have flown in a few countries around the world, and, with the very rare exception, found PNG operators to be among the most conscious of weight limitations. If this accident had been caused by overloading, the aircraft would be near the pine trees on the side of the Oksapmin valley, not on approach to Kiunga.
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Old 18th Apr 2016, 00:46
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I remember a Twin Otter accident in 1994 or 1995 which had 28 onboard.
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Old 18th Apr 2016, 02:54
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Single engine performance is the limitation, especially in ISA +20 conditions.

Good check and training certainly helps, but sadly the pool of experienced in country check and training captains left in PNG is drying up very quickly.

How many examiners/FOIs do CASA PNG have who currently go out and do flight tests?
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Old 18th Apr 2016, 07:56
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fish

How many examiners/FOIs do CASA PNG have who currently go out and do flight tests?
I know of at least one.
He was on a type rating check flight I did last month.
PNG national.
CASA PNG Flight Examiner.
Over 28,000 flight hours.
Incredibly experienced, helpful, polite and inspiring examiner.
He gave real world practical advice and was very alert to the differences in the pilots he tested.

I was most impressed and grateful that CASA PNG has such staff.
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Old 18th Apr 2016, 21:00
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Originally Posted by weloveseaplanes View Post
I know of at least one.
He was on a type rating check flight I did last month.
PNG national.
CASA PNG Flight Examiner.
Over 28,000 flight hours.
Incredibly experienced, helpful, polite and inspiring examiner.
He gave real world practical advice and was very alert to the differences in the pilots he tested.

I was most impressed and grateful that CASA PNG has such staff.
While not wishing to criticise Inspectors who generally do a good job,I would query those qualifications.
Firstly,to have 28'000 hours you would have to have been long haul for many years where you max out yearly because of the long international sectors.
There is only on Inspector in PNG CASA who has that and he is from Aus and not PNG ,although I believe there is one who is highly respected within the aviation community and possibly more,but he is not old enough to have accumulated 28'000 hours
Inspectors who work for CASA are extremely underpaid compared to operating pilots in the country and this is why they can't attract many nationals who have great job opportunities in their own country.
They are generally understaffed and this is one reason for lack of oversight on their part and not their ability to do the job.
This is one reason why some types from down south and across the ditch manage to get into senior flying jobs with very dubious backgrounds and qualifications.The end result is inevitable.
In his case,the people in charge of the company are well known to be of a high caliber as was the pilot; it was just a tragic accident.
Don't fudge he facts for a good story.
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Old 18th Apr 2016, 21:10
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Firstly,to have 28'000 hours you would have to have been long haul for many years where you max out yearly because of the long international sectors.
Not necessarily. I recall many PNG domestic pilots maxing out every year at 900 hours, resulting in early annual leave. I know of a number of retired PNG domestic pilots with over 25,000 hours, all flown within PNG.

But I agree, there may not be many PNG National pilots with 28,000 hours.
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Old 19th Apr 2016, 06:20
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Billy Johns -deceased- had over 25,000 before he retired at 70. I think Captain Honner semi-retired has close to 27,000 hours, just a guess,correct me if I am wrong (I'm sure he won't mind me giving him a rap and mentioning his name) and then there is good old John Regan who was flying strong at 80; it's anyone's guess how many hours he had? He was a CASA inspector.
But you are right they, CASA PNG, are undermanned and under paid. Yes they certainly flew a lot of short sectors and long days in the Talair/Douglas days accumulating 900 hours sometimes in 10 months, resulting in a nice long deserved break.
Craven

Last edited by Cravenmorehead; 19th Apr 2016 at 06:34.
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Old 19th Apr 2016, 08:05
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fish

While not wishing to criticise Inspectors who generally do a good job,I would query those qualifications.
.
If my memory serves me the CASA PNG examiner we had said he had some 28,000 hours with 6,000 fixed wing and the rest rotary . . . (he could have said 26,000 hours with 8,000 fixed wing). Either way he could well have been flying for over 40 years. He mentioned having flown with Talair as Cravenmorehead spoke of above.

Well done CASA PNG for sending us such a Flight Examiner as have never seen one like him in 32 years of flying. He was a top notch bloke, real good value and mature enough to have the hours. He talked like a pilot, walked like a pilot and knew aircraft like a pilot.

It good to know that there are excellent experienced pilots in PNG.
Thanks tail wheel and Cravenmorehead for your supportive replies.

Am sorry again for the loss at Sunbird.

Last edited by weloveseaplanes; 19th Apr 2016 at 08:34.
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Old 19th Apr 2016, 10:14
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Billy Johns -deceased- had over 25,000 before he retired at 70.
I attended a party to mark his passing 30,000 hours in the mid-90's, and he was still at it.

Another of his ex-PX colleagues who is still fit and healthy, but no longer flying, has over 34,000, and he has turned 70 within the past 12 months.

I also recall that the late Tom Peninsa had over 20,000 hours (all in PNG except the first 180 hours) when in early his 40's; I think he had a little difficulty understanding the CAO 48 limits.
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Old 19th Apr 2016, 10:14
  #38 (permalink)  
Man Bilong Balus long PNG
 
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He mentioned having flown with Talair
In which case I reckon I once met him. Only briefly, but

He talked like a pilot, walked like a pilot and knew aircraft like a pilot.
Yep!

Langtaim ago nau.
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Old 19th Apr 2016, 23:28
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Originally Posted by tail wheel View Post
Not necessarily. I recall many PNG domestic pilots maxing out every year at 900 hours, resulting in early annual leave. I know of a number of retired PNG domestic pilots with over 25,000 hours, all flown within PNG.

But I agree, there may not be many PNG National pilots with 28,000 hours.
I did not intend to query the fact about how many hours the pilot had,but the I know the PNG national he refers to who is a top notch guy for whom I consider to be one of the best operators I have met and he describes him well; except for the 28'000 hours.
He would only be in his early 50's and good as he is,could not have that many hours.
Pilot's like Biil Johns who was over 70 when he left, John Regan,78 and Gary Honour now about 73 .
The only pilot in CASA over 70 is an ex Qantas pilot who I understand flew 747's.
The bottom line is, CASA does very little surveillance because it is underfunded and Inspectors generally don't stay too long when there are more opportunities in the private world in many different areas.
If you are talking about accidents then have a look a some of those senior expat managers,although in the case of this accident,they are very experienced and professional and as I said,so was the pilot.
We should let the investigators find the facts and show some respect for all concerned.
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Old 20th Apr 2016, 11:52
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I also recall that the late Tom Peninsa had over 20,000 hours (all in PNG except the first 180 hours) when in early his 40's; I think he had a little difficulty understanding the CAO 48 limits.
Excellent bush pilot was Tom, liked a drink as well. Tragically another accident statistic.
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