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Australian pilots can work for US regionals.

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Australian pilots can work for US regionals.

Old 18th Jul 2018, 23:01
  #641 (permalink)  
 
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Public Service Announcement

Hi, I am sharing this info for anyone considering making the move over. This excert was received from a recruiter:


Thank you for applying to the First Officer position with xxxx Airlines! Before we start the interview process we wanted to clarify our status on the E3 Visa application. This is a fairly arduous undertaking and can take a couple of months to process. We will help submit the documentation needed for the E3 visa process. Once the visa is approved, there is a process to be eligible for employment in the United States. This includes traveling to the country prior to your potential class date, applying for a social security card (can take up to 3 weeks), and obtaining a United States phone number and address. Xxxx will not provide travel to the States, nor lodging for any of this process prior to ground school or CTP training.

It is worth considering that other E3 regionals will provide flights and accom for the entire period it takes to establish your life here, as well as during your ATP CTP. Ro not underestimate the cost of having to pay for it yourself while not drawing a salary. Also, a very few of the E3 regionals only provide dual occupancy hotel rooms during training, don't have signing bonuses etc.

When it comes to doing your own research, I found airlinepilotforums.com and its airline data pages to be an invaluable resource in making an informed decision.

Good hunting,

DropYourSocks
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Old 19th Jul 2018, 03:56
  #642 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by DUXNUTZ
Great if it comes off. Delta/United/Southwest have all cut back recruitment suddenly for reasons unknown but possibly due increasing fuel prices. I’m very skeptical still of the shortage crisis holding up, if it was coming to roost Delta, FedEx etc would have to dumb down their nasa style interviews somewhat.
As far as UAL is concerned, we do 99% of our training at the main training center in DEN and for the last, god knows how long, it’s been undergoing a complete refurbishment. It’s been a bomb site for at least the last 2 years and is only now, starting to look like it should. Together with the 747 retirements and training of those crews, there’s been a huge bottleneck in the training pipeline. Also, we’ve streamlined the scheduling of flights and departure/arrival banks at the hubs, which has meant the aircraft are flying more, with less overall new pilots needed.

UAL may see DAL hiring numbers but from the numbers I’ve seen, I doubt it. This all means sh1t if the trade war goes nuclear. A large proportion of our intl. operation is to mainland China and if that went bye bye, I’m pretty sure I’d be out on the street and I’ve been here 3 years.

Oh...and if age 67 passes, it’ll be a disaster to a lot of careers.
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Old 20th Jul 2018, 01:09
  #643 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Kenny


As far as UAL is concerned, we do 99% of our training at the main training center in DEN and for the last, god knows how long, it’s been undergoing a complete refurbishment. It’s been a bomb site for at least the last 2 years and is only now, starting to look like it should. Together with the 747 retirements and training of those crews, there’s been a huge bottleneck in the training pipeline. Also, we’ve streamlined the scheduling of flights and departure/arrival banks at the hubs, which has meant the aircraft are flying more, with less overall new pilots needed.

UAL may see DAL hiring numbers but from the numbers I’ve seen, I doubt it. This all means sh1t if the trade war goes nuclear. A large proportion of our intl. operation is to mainland China and if that went bye bye, I’m pretty sure I’d be out on the street and I’ve been here 3 years.

Oh...and if age 67 passes, it’ll be a disaster to a lot of careers.
Had an inspector in the jump the other day. He seems pretty keen on 2020 as some kind of implementation or rule change date for age 67. Seems a bit soon. The way everyone is freaking about retirements and the pool drying up makes me nervous though.
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Old 20th Jul 2018, 07:46
  #644 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Telfer86
Where are things at regarding E3 visas these days ?
I've been curious about that too. I haven't seen any statement from the government indicating how the E3 quals are being handled or if they've tightened the screws on them.
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Old 20th Jul 2018, 08:33
  #645 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by bafanguy
I've been curious about that too. I haven't seen any statement from the government indicating how the E3 quals are being handled or if they've tightened the screws on them.
People are still being granted the E3 and the E3R (renewal) visas without needing a university degree nor 12 years of industry experience. One mate just arrived a few weeks ago, and another is on their way here.

Last edited by VH DSJ; 20th Jul 2018 at 15:08. Reason: grammar police
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Old 20th Jul 2018, 12:12
  #646 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by VH DSJ
People are still being granted the E3 and the E3R (renewal) visas without the needing a university degree nor 12 years of industry experience. One mate just arrived a few weeks ago, and another is on their way here.
yah it sounds like pot luck on the consulate interviewer on how strict they are.

whatever you do, do NOT misrepresent anything to the consulate trying to get yourself over the line as you may end up with an entry ban to the US.
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Old 21st Jul 2018, 01:08
  #647 (permalink)  
 
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Also remember that arriving more than 10 days prior to work is a violation your visa terms.

​​​​​​You can get everything done in 10 days and can begin "work" if you have applied for a social security card.
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Old 26th Jul 2018, 01:53
  #648 (permalink)  
 
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Yes, it does take close to 10 days to get the actual Social “card” posted out to you.. HOWEVER it is considerably faster (I was told overnight and mine was ready in 3 days which was the earliest I could check): if you revisit the SS admin office a second time again after your initial application they can then release your actual SS number to you.

To start work the airline just needs the SS number, not a copy of the card so this can speed things up quite a bit.

Cheers Ralphi
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Old 26th Jul 2018, 14:46
  #649 (permalink)  
 
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Fly AMERICA - Goat stew to gumbo

So, like dozens of my countrypeople pilots I am an Aussie pilot having heard and responded to the call coming from across the Pacific “please come fly for us, we will provide you with a ATP and type rating” ok sounds good. Some opportunities go further “hey you know what we will provide you with flights to and from the USA and a healthy signing bonus to boot” ok sounds even better.

So having always enjoyed traveling and with a like minded partner I signed on the dotted line and voila am now sitting enjoying some local goat stew from Curacao, to be shortly followed by Gumbo as I head to New Orleans tomorrow on non revenue flights business class. My circumstance has allowed three distinct “holidays”between the training slots due to the backlog in training with my particular airline, each of these whilst being paid and being able to fly to 2/3 of the world for mere pennies.

The USA is a monster, a giant economy of which the airlinel sector is a integral cog. Coming out of the little Aussie market I was blown away with just how many career opportunities are available as long as you met the criteria of 1500 hours, requisite industry experience and formal training in aviation. A lot of my peers actually can’t believe that they have just been offered a job to fly a regional jet when they get the first offer and I have seen them jump at that. My advice would be to remember that the scare commodity now is actually the PILOT = you, so the first offer may not be best fit, take your time to decide what you really want in terms or things like start date, etc. I have had no problem in employers accommodating my requests.

Personally I took the second offer as this allowed the best fit for me. Having two consecutive summers, instead of consecutive winters was an easier transition. Having better travel benefits to relocate myself and family and having more certainty as to which city I would be based in were all part of my decision. As I have already said the US market is big enough to allow you the luxury of this type of choice.

So ATP and type rating in hand I reflect on the journey last few months. The US certainly presents friendly skies to the Aussie with a professional attitude. I found the breaks in my training allowed my to be best prepared in the indoc, systems, other ground school and simulator phases of training and thereby reduced the stress factors associated with the steep learning curve of the first jet. My peers, Captains I was paired in training, instructors and guys and gals I met whilst jump-seating to date have been “true gentlemen and women of the skies”.

The move to a new country is a giant step in life, but it is one through which we can really develop our boundaries and I would completely recommend it after you perform some in depth homework on your new employer. I personally know many pilots at both the number 1 employer of Oz pilots and the second and third place getters in terms of numbers flying there.

The match you make will really be a big part of your experience, is it union or non union, base certainty, time on reserve, benefits like travel and when these are available, time to upgrade, how they treat their staff, etc, etc and etc. the general feedback I have from the primary choices made by Aussies is good to great, but there are some less attractive options if you don’t do the homework. The resources on the web are immense and fully allow you to get this knowledge with little effort. As already pointed out above a few hours on US specific forums like airlinepilotforums will pay big dividends in making the right decision.

I personally have no regrets whatsoever and have only very minor gripes with my choice, these are far outweighed by the quality of training, immediate benefits and team I now work within.

My info gathering was very much assisted by this forum and stars like Havick, bafanguy et al and I thank you for helping get started on the journey. Safe Landings I want to commend you on your attitude, which in my view is the single most import aspect to getting through training.

I will post an update down the road with some more hours under the belt on the actual jet, feel free to pm me if you have queries on my journey.

Re the SSN release, I had to do it in a very particular way - they definetly won’t release it by phone and they won’t print it for you on the second visit, however the agent I had agreed to read it off the screen for me to write down as when generated it becomes “my information”. Agree it will come down to each agent and an big element of luck..

Cheers from Ewemerica, Ralphi
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Old 26th Jul 2018, 15:37
  #650 (permalink)  
 
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Ralphi,

Nice write up. Good to hear about a positive experience. Will you be able to upgrade when you get the 1,000 hours Part 121 time or will that take longer where you're flying ?
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Old 27th Jul 2018, 00:15
  #651 (permalink)  
 
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A fantastic no bullsh@t post.

I take my hat of to you a who have given it a crack. What a great experience. As has been mentioned many times it’s all about personal choice.

I think I’ve said it before, go the USA route, get a command with a few thousand hours and the world opens as an expat pilot. The way things are going, hit China for 3/5 years (certainly not for everyone), invest well and retire.

Livin the dream. Well done guys.

I am still tossing up wether or not to hit Stateside!
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Old 27th Jul 2018, 02:21
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Ralphi, An encouraging post. I am currently about 2 months out from pulling the trigger on the USA plan. Its a big uncertain step and your positive post on PPRuNe sure stands out as a beacon! I'm planning on basing in Detroit due to my wife's family location in Canada; I am certain that Detroit will be a good move for flying.

Flying jets in the USA sure does have merits over a Dash gig in Australia even if it is in the Q group. I think Q has a way to go with regards to transfers within the group etc before the positives outway the negatives of going to Link.

To anyone else out there: Does Skywest still take E3s? I have heard there has been a pushback / slowdown.
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Old 27th Jul 2018, 03:11
  #653 (permalink)  
 
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To those who are still weighing options before taking the plunge, for what it's worth these are a few of the big points I considered before making the move:

- where do I want to live? If you're in Sydney or Melbourne, cost of living is high compared to even a jet FO salary. If you want the US to perhaps be a permanent move, property and living in general is significantly cheaper stateside, and taxes are also lower. The way I justified the move with regard to where I live, is that my own family was always a day's travel from any of the major cities, so what difference is there if it's one or two days travel? So moving to the US is not that much more of a stretch for me at least.

- career prospects at home? If you want a command with any of the big 4, you are looking at 8-20 years to left seat, depending on where you go. Do you have the time to burn waiting for it? After all, the left seat is the salary range you need to live comfortably in Syd or Mel. Reaching your maximum earning potential is even further away if you have to stop off at a regional first.

- Once you have a left seat, what then? Where does your career progress to from there? Are you happy flying domestic for the rest of your career, or will there be widebody opportunities? Will move to another airline, or is this airline a career destination?

- If you make the move, how will it play out for you? If the move isn't permanent, then you get your command time and head back home to join a seniority list, or use that time as mentioned above to chase big money contract work.

- What if you can make the move permanent ie greencard? If you can stay in the US, then there is opportunity to progress your career quickly, get to a major, or if not at least a narrowbody for a LCC where command time varies ~3-5 years. If you want to make it permanent, how will you get that greencard? It is also worth comparing maximum earning potential for a US captain vs an Aussie captain as there is a big difference.

I would also like to point out that there are no right or wrong answers to what you should do, and I am not necessarily suggesting any option is better than the other. These are just some of the big questions that I had to ask myself honestly and try to answer realistically. Based on my answers I took the plunge. So far it has been a great adventure.

If anyone wants to chat about what it all involves, feel free to pm me.

Happy hunting.

Socks
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Old 27th Jul 2018, 06:33
  #654 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by DropYourSocks
To those who are still weighing options before taking the plunge, for what it's worth these are a few of the big points I considered before making the move:

- where do I want to live? If you're in Sydney or Melbourne, cost of living is high compared to even a jet FO salary. If you want the US to perhaps be a permanent move, property and living in general is significantly cheaper stateside, and taxes are also lower. The way I justified the move with regard to where I live, is that my own family was always a day's travel from any of the major cities, so what difference is there if it's one or two days travel? So moving to the US is not that much more of a stretch for me at least.

- career prospects at home? If you want a command with any of the big 4, you are looking at 8-20 years to left seat, depending on where you go. Do you have the time to burn waiting for it? After all, the left seat is the salary range you need to live comfortably in Syd or Mel. Reaching your maximum earning potential is even further away if you have to stop off at a regional first.

- Once you have a left seat, what then? Where does your career progress to from there? Are you happy flying domestic for the rest of your career, or will there be widebody opportunities? Will move to another airline, or is this airline a career destination?

- If you make the move, how will it play out for you? If the move isn't permanent, then you get your command time and head back home to join a seniority list, or use that time as mentioned above to chase big money contract work.

- What if you can make the move permanent ie greencard? If you can stay in the US, then there is opportunity to progress your career quickly, get to a major, or if not at least a narrowbody for a LCC where command time varies ~3-5 years. If you want to make it permanent, how will you get that greencard? It is also worth comparing maximum earning potential for a US captain vs an Aussie captain as there is a big difference.

I would also like to point out that there are no right or wrong answers to what you should do, and I am not necessarily suggesting any option is better than the other. These are just some of the big questions that I had to ask myself honestly and try to answer realistically. Based on my answers I took the plunge. So far it has been a great adventure.

If anyone wants to chat about what it all involves, feel free to pm me.

Happy hunting.

Socks
I've been following these posts for a while now and i've seen a lot of info on the U.S aviation scene.

Anyone that wants to go to the U.S and fly for a regional airline, should realise before they depart OZ, it's not a holiday going there,
it's intense work, flying in a first world aviation environment and airports, day, night, all types of weather.

If a person doesn't make the grade during their training, they will be sent home.

I can see the OZ pilots that are currently there with the regionals, being upgraded to Captain at their particular airline and their E3's extended every 2 years.

Unless a person gets a green card, i CANNOT see any OZ pilot progressing to the U.S majors or low cost airlines, it WON'T happen on an E3.

The tax system (weekly pay as you go, tax taken out of a pay) there, is virtually the equivalent to the OZ tax system here.

I can see OZ pilots that worked in U.S regionals, walking into Jetstar and Virgin, without anyone stopping them, no problems.

A REX Captain and Qlink Dash 8 F/O, earns 20% more than a U.S regional jet Captain.
Then again, we don't have EMB175/CRJ900 jets here in OZ or populations of greater than 350 million.

Anyone that wants to go to the U.S and fly should go but a person should bring a lot of cash with them.
 
Old 27th Jul 2018, 07:04
  #655 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Seagull201
I've been following these posts for a while now and i've seen a lot of info on the U.S aviation scene.

Anyone that wants to go to the U.S and fly for a regional airline, should realise before they depart OZ, it's not a holiday going there,
it's intense work, flying in a first world aviation environment and airports, day, night, all types of weather.

If a person doesn't make the grade during their training, they will be sent home.

I can see the OZ pilots that are currently there with the regionals, being upgraded to Captain at their particular airline and their E3's extended every 2 years.

Unless a person gets a green card, i CANNOT see any OZ pilot progressing to the U.S majors or low cost airlines, it WON'T happen on an E3.

The tax system (weekly pay as you go, tax taken out of a pay) there, is virtually the equivalent to the OZ tax system here.

I can see OZ pilots that worked in U.S regionals, walking into Jetstar and Virgin, without anyone stopping them, no problems.

A REX Captain and Qlink Dash 8 F/O, earns 20% more than a U.S regional jet Captain.
Then again, we don't have EMB175/CRJ900 jets here in OZ or populations of greater than 350 million.

Anyone that wants to go to the U.S and fly should go but a person should bring a lot of cash with them.
Username checks out.
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Old 27th Jul 2018, 12:31
  #656 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Seagull201
I've been following these posts for a while now and i've seen a lot of info on the U.S aviation scene.

Anyone that wants to go to the U.S and fly for a regional airline, should realise before they depart OZ, it's not a holiday going there,
it's intense work, flying in a first world aviation environment and airports, day, night, all types of weather.

If a person doesn't make the grade during their training, they will be sent home.

I can see the OZ pilots that are currently there with the regionals, being upgraded to Captain at their particular airline and their E3's extended every 2 years.

Unless a person gets a green card, i CANNOT see any OZ pilot progressing to the U.S majors or low cost airlines, it WON'T happen on an E3.

The tax system (weekly pay as you go, tax taken out of a pay) there, is virtually the equivalent to the OZ tax system here.

I can see OZ pilots that worked in U.S regionals, walking into Jetstar and Virgin, without anyone stopping them, no problems.

A REX Captain and Qlink Dash 8 F/O, earns 20% more than a U.S regional jet Captain.
Then again, we don't have EMB175/CRJ900 jets here in OZ or populations of greater than 350 million.

Anyone that wants to go to the U.S and fly should go but a person should bring a lot of cash with them.
just to compare apples with apples then, what does a REX and QLINK skipper earn? How long does it take to uograde frin first joining an Aussie regional?
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Old 27th Jul 2018, 13:34
  #657 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Seagull201
I've been following these posts for a while now and i've seen a lot of info on the U.S aviation scene.

Anyone that wants to go to the U.S and fly for a regional airline, should realise before they depart OZ, it's not a holiday going there,

Why should it be? Prospective regional pilots are seeking a job, not a paid vacation.

it's intense work, flying in a first world aviation environment and airports, day, night, all types of weather.

yup, just like aviation elsewhere, except with expert support. And ATC

If a person doesn't make the grade during their training, they will be sent home.


And that’s a problem how, exactly?


I can see the OZ pilots that are currently there with the regionals, being upgraded to Captain at their particular airline and their E3's extended every 2 years.

Unless a person gets a green card, i CANNOT see any OZ pilot progressing to the U.S majors or low cost airlines, it WON'T happen on an E3.


Sorry, bullsh*t. Your crystal ball came from Wallmart, same as mine. The industry has many champions in the halls of government, and no one can say what abenues to citizenship may develop.

The tax system (weekly pay as you go, tax taken out of a
pay) there, is virtually the equivalent to the OZ tax system here.

But at a much lower rate. Who cares about the mechanism?

I can see OZ pilots that worked in U.S regionals, walking into Jetstar and Virgin, without anyone stopping them, no problems.

But why would they? Why would you trade a palpable lifestyle advantage to be in one English speaking country over another?*

*well...sort of English. Y’all.


A REX Captain and Qlink Dash 8 F/O, earns 20% more than a U.S regional jet Captain.
Then again, we don't have EMB175/CRJ900 jets here in OZ or populations of greater than 350 million.

And what is their relative buying power after tax? I’d wager the US regional pilot gets a 30-40% better buying power.

Anyone that wants to go to the U.S and fly should go but a person should bring a lot of cash with them.
sour grapes?

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Old 27th Jul 2018, 20:48
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Originally Posted by Australopithecus


sour grapes?


Maybe. There’s so much incorrect information in his post, that it’s actually a disservice to people weighing their options. Which is a shame after people (including yourself) have spent the time to be informative.

I think everything Seagull201 knows about flying in the U.S. comes from the internet. Not by actually doing it, or knowing (in person, not the internet) someone who has done it.

Edited to add - if the PJN pay scale for Rex is even close to accurate; a new Captain on 2nd year pay at Skywest would make about 8% more than a top of pay scale Rex Captain. The Skywest Captain would pay substantially less tax.

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Old 27th Jul 2018, 21:12
  #659 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Seagull201

Anyone that wants to go to the U.S and fly should go but a person should bring a lot of cash with them.
Disagree with this. Sure a bit of capital is required to get yourself going, and it can be very helpful in securing a rental property when you have no established credit.

First year FO salary at Skywest is enough for myself and my wife live well and to go on the occasional holiday, just don't booze it up and / or eat out all the time and you'll be fine. If you come over with 1500 TT or more then you can expect to upgrade asap and leave the FO pay behind.

You're missing the major advantage over any Australian airline and that is the travel benefits. You can pretty much travel anywhere in the world for next to nothing, and anywhere in the USA for free. Once you have your pilot licence you can jumpseat on most US carriers, even cargo airlines.
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Old 27th Jul 2018, 22:39
  #660 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Seagull201
...it's not a holiday going there,
it's intense work, flying in a first world aviation environment and airports, day, night, all types of weather.

If a person doesn't make the grade during their training, they will be sent home.

I can see the OZ pilots that are currently there with the regionals, being upgraded to Captain at their particular airline and their E3's extended every 2 years.

Unless a person gets a green card, i CANNOT see any OZ pilot progressing to the U.S majors or low cost airlines, it WON'T happen on an E3.
Seagull201,

You're right about several issues you listed.

The flying can be pretty intense particularly in the NE US in winter. Always cramming 10 lbs in a 5 lb can with winter just amplifying it all. I can't think of a better opportunity to get in trouble than KLGA or KDCA ( and many other airports) in winter. But, it's all good experience and a person should have a minimum of two of those under his belt before acting as PIC.

And, yes, they even send US citizens home if they can't cut the mustard.

I should hope that E3s will be upgraded when their turn comes and they've shown ability. The PIC time will look good on your CV.

As for moving beyond a regional as an E3, who knows what the Perfumed Princes of the Kackistocracy will do with immigration laws. But...as it stands now, a green card is required to make oneself eligible for an LCC or legacy carrier. And the competition for those spots is FIERCE and will continue to be forever. It's possible one could weave the Aussie magic on some of the local talent and marry into a green card. Then he'd be off the the races with a whole other slate of things to be frustrated about. Drop us a line when that happens and we'll provide that list.
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