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Andrew M
4th May 2003, 21:24
So folks, what did we all get ???

I had 105 last year - hoping to improve that ! :D

Buster Hyman
4th May 2003, 22:01
I wanted to watch it when it was on in Oz, but I couldn't figure out the remote control.:(

Andrew M
4th May 2003, 22:38
Couldn't work the remote !?!

Maybe it is just as well you didn't do the IQ test then :p ;) :D

Binoculars
4th May 2003, 22:50
Andrew, I applaud your honesty, but I think I can safely say that based on the claimed results for the last quiz on this thread, you are gonna be a long last. This place is full of geniuses! ;)

Andrew M
5th May 2003, 01:09
I'd rather be a honest numpty than a lying Einstein if you know what I mean :D !

Anyway, it's not fair ..... when using Sky Digital for the results (throught BBC-i interactive Television) you have to select your age. I am 16 so my IQ for the correct number of answers was 105. However, if I selected I was over 70+ then the equivalent IQ would have been ~ 120. Don't know the reason for this, but according to the results you can get 50/70 correct - be labeled as Mensa material if you were 35 but your a dummy if you are 17.

Don't understand it at all :confused:

djk
5th May 2003, 01:39
I honestly can't remember what I got last year. I did the test online while stuck at work. sheesh that was a boring evening :D

Andrew M
5th May 2003, 05:57
I got 120.

However, after going to the website and entering in the same answers - but selecting 70+ rather than 16 for age - the answer was 142.

Apparantly, this doesn't mean you are more intelligent - the results are only comparable to similar age groups.

witchdoctor
5th May 2003, 07:28
32 yrs old and IQ 130 according to on-line test. That's what I guessed at, as after leaving Uni I did a Mensa test and scored 133. Didn't want to join as one of my ex girlfriends informed me hers is 164! I guess it must be the IQ equivalent of being laughed at with your pants down!

Glad all the intervening beer, ATPLs and prooning hasn't frazzled what little brain I started with.:}

I'd love to know how pilots, ATCOs, cabin crew and ground handlers would stack up against each other though. Any takers?

Andrew M
5th May 2003, 07:34
on the show they had Engineers, Blondes and so on.

Perhaps next year they could have pilots, aeronautical engineers and ATCO's ! :D

by the way, considering my IQ is 120 at age 16 - this will increase when I reach adulthood at ~28.

Lets say that due to age reasons the IQ increases to 130. Is this high enough to be a pilot - as I know that sponsorships and so on have psycometric testing.

witchdoctor
5th May 2003, 07:54
Ha Ha Ha!!!

Don't be fooled sonny! Remember the average IQ of those earning 50K+ was only 93!!!:ooh:

Do you read these pages often? Ever visited wannabees? :}

Andrew M
5th May 2003, 08:02
Hmm good point :D

Next time I'm going to the continent I'll be going on the ferry, or flying myself :p

simon brown
8th May 2003, 22:57
Witchdoctor

Good point... how many people whom pride themselves on having a high IQ whom:

a) cant wire a plug

b) dont know where Iraq is

c) work 40 hours a week for 40 years for a pittance for someone else

d) are generally a loud annoying git , whom spend most of their time blowing their own trumpet in the tea room whilst plugging in a kettle with wet hands

....and they say they are intelligent

I seem to remember George Bush wasnt the smartest tinny in the pack when it came to the old IQ test

:E ;)

Whirlybird
9th May 2003, 00:31
Andrew,

You need to understand how IQ works. It relates someone's "intelligence" (whatever that is) to others of the same age. So the average is 100, because that's how you define it. Now, ability to do IQ tests declines with age. So, if, for example, an average person scored 35 on a test at age 16, and 25 at age 70, both of these would equate to an IQ of 100. So it's not that you would be more intellingent if you were older, it's that you'll probably score less when you're older, because your brain, like everything else, will start to droop. :( :( :( Does that make sense?

However, as a Mensa member and psychology graduate (not that either proves much, but I just thought I'd mention it :) ) I have my doubts about the test they used. I've never seen a memory test in an IQ test before. And you usually get timed for the whole test, not each question. Did they standardise it for that method of testing, ie check that it measured what they thought it did? And I ended up with an IQ of 123, but if I was three months older, it would have been 136. Now, I know you have to have a cut-off line, but that's ridiculous.

So I think the whole thing is designed more to be good entertainment and popular TV than as a serious test. And of course, IQ tests are not that accurate in terms of predictability anyway, and that's been known since I was a student...and I'm OLD! So I wouldn't worry about your score; treat the whole thing as what it was meant to be - a bit of fun.

FlyingForFun
9th May 2003, 00:39
I didn't do it last year. This year, since I was at my parents' house, I was forced to do it along with the rest of my family, and I scored 135.

I forget what my IQ would have worked out to if I'd got 100% on the test, but because of my age, it wouldn't have been much higher than 140. So presumably it isn't possible for someone in my age group to have an IQ of 160? I agree with Whirly - more to do with entertainment than establishing anyone's intelligence. Was good to wind up my family, though, because they all scored lower than me ;) My sister "marked" my paper, and groaned every time I got 100% on any one section when she didn't! :D

FFF
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Andrew M
9th May 2003, 03:26
So it's not that you would be more intellingent if you were older, it's that you'll probably score less when you're older, because your brain, like everything else, will start to droop

Hmm, I always thought that elders were somebody to look at for wisdom :D

Rollingthunder
9th May 2003, 03:32
Ghastly Quizmaster: Hello, good evening and welcome to the very final edition of your favourite television quiz programme Spot the Braincell. Thirty minutes of cheerful ritual humiliation of the old and greedy. And could we have our first contestant, please!

Quizmaster: Ha ha ha ... ha ha ha. Good evening, Madam! And your name is?
Ratbag: Yes, Michael.
Quizmaster: Ha ha ha! Jolly good -- and what is your name?
Ratbag: I go to church regularly.
Quizmaster: Ha ha ha, I see. And which particular prize do you have eyes for this evening?
Ratbag: I'd like the blow on the head.
Quizmaster: The blow -- on the head!
Ratbag: Yes, just there, where it hurts.
Quizmaster: Jolly good! Well now Madam your first question for the blow on the head this evening is: Which great opponent of Cartesian dualism resists the reduction of psychological phenomena to a physical state and insists there is no point of contact between the extended and the unextended?
Ratbag: I don't know that.
Quizmaster: Well -- have a guess!
Ratbag: Oh... Henri Bergson?
Quizmaster: ...is the correct answer! (Piano chords)
Ratbag: Ooh, that was lucky. I never even heard of him.

Whirlybird
9th May 2003, 03:43
Andrew,

The question is: Is intelligence the same thing as wisdom?

Discuss. ;)

Andrew M
9th May 2003, 04:53
Well, no. I wouldn't say I had lots of wisdom (which I would say is intelligence inherited from experience), but i have some intelligence.

Intelligence isn't really a measure of what you know and what you can do eg: a degree or a high pressure job, but really it is a measure of how well we can manage day to day problems that we all encounter.

corsair
9th May 2003, 07:08
I scored 102, it should be a little higher because of finger trouble but that pretty much throws me into the average bracket. Which is surprising as I did the Mensa test previously and scored 150. Now I am intelligent enough to realize that that two tests are not necesssarily compatible. However according to Mensa I scored among the the high 2% of the population (puffed with pride). Yet on the BBC I'm dull to average, one of the common folk (sad loser).

So which is it? Am I super intelligent or just think I am? I'm suspicious of these tests.

Soulman
10th May 2003, 00:12
Ahh... IQ Tests - Don't they bring out the best in everyone?

And here's one from the record books...

Who had the higher IQ - Marilyn Monroe or Sir Albert Einstein? If you guessed the probable Einstein, sorry - you are INCORRECT.

Take my word for it - Marilyn Monroe had a HIGHER IQ than Albert Einstein.

And who said you can't have looks AND brains? :p

Tinstaafl
10th May 2003, 08:24
Who said MM had looks...???




As for the score that the 'Test the Nation' thing gave you, you need to know what scale is being used. They're all based on 100 as the middle point (average) but just how many steps up the IQ ladder each point is worth varies amongst the different IQ tests.

IQ is a comparison against everyone else, measured along a percentile eg the top 1%, top 2%, top 50%, bottom 5% etc etc. What each of these means is that the person concerned has a higher IQ than the other 99%, 98% etc etc of the population. Without knowing the scale that was used in the 'Test the Nation' test then it's a bit meaningless to compare the score number.

Like Whirly, I'm also a Mensa member. Mensa specifies a percentile as their entry criteria (top 2% ie 98th percentile). Different tests will give a different score for the same percentile. Funnily enough, I scored in the 98th percentile using the Mensa English language test, and 99th percentile using the 'culturally fair' test. That's the non-language test. Go figure...

As Whirly says, for a test to be meaningful it must be validated against the population it purports to test. That means that not only the questions,but the process must be shown to measure what is purported to be tested, that it is accurate, consistent and able to be replicated.

What was done to validate the TV program's test? Before it was aired, of course.

arcniz
10th May 2003, 17:11
Intelligence is similar to horsepower - the wherewithal to grind through a problem even if you've never seen it before.

Wisdom is like assets - the means to obtain a solution to the problem without having to do all the grinding onesself.

I'd like another helping of each, please.

Whirlybird
10th May 2003, 19:03
Tinny,

IQ tests were originally designed to test "populations" and people around the average. It's quite difficult to get them to be really accurate when you get to the 98th or 99th percentile, even with the tests designed for that. So the fact that your score differed by maybe a couple of points on two different tests? No big deal and doesn't honestly mean a thing.

One amusing point...in the Mensa magazine some organisation advertises that says it's for the 99.9th percentile and above. Well, I'm not good at that many things (see my posts on the computer forum :( :{ ) but I am pretty good at IQ tests, so I sent off for their test out of sheer curiosity, and sent it in. They wrote to me, saying I missed getting in by half a per cent or something, but asked if I wanted to practice and try again!!!! Words fail me....:confused: I know practice worked for learning to land a PA38, but somehow I had this vague idea that intelligence was a bit more...kind of constant...(maybe that's the right word, not sure) than that. :)

witchdoctor
10th May 2003, 21:23
Intelligence is what is required to avoid being screwed over by an FTO in gaining a licence.

Wisdom is what you receive after being screwed over by an FTO in gaining a licence.

Older, wiser, but considerably poorer.:p