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tony draper
26th Oct 2002, 12:53
Drapes (shopping done, all saturday moning tasks accomplished, chat being devoid of Prooners)was sitting with coffee and ciggie watching a repeat of Micheal Palins excellent Around The World In Eighty Days.
One noticed, (not for the first time the habit of the good folks of the Indian Sub Continent ) of nodding the head to indicate no and the shaking of the head to indicate yes,.
Now Drapes in his yoof did visit that fine country and noticed this for himself, and being a curious cove did some research into this apparently 180 degree shift in comunication behaviour.
The habit of the head nod to indicate yes and the rotation in the horizontal plain to indicate no , is something we are born with, its is not learned behaviour.
Oddly enough ones researches led drapes to discover that this habit only exsists in one other place, and that is a small area in Europe( these researches were carried out many years ago and one has forgotten the exact co-ordinnates of the said head shaking head nodding back to front Europeans)
Drapes is not trying to make a profound point here, just trying to promote discussion and to remind his fellow prooner that even on a boring saturday morning this planet and the people thereon are a source of endless and facinating interlectual puzzles for those of us cursed with a child like curiosity .

PS, Imagine if this behaviour was different betwixt the two sexes, can one imagine what it would be like if the female of the species nodded to indicate no, and shook the head to indicate yes,
come to think about it they already do that.:rolleyes:


PPS, in a distant land far far away a figure slouches in front of a huge wide screen, his eyes are dulled with days of DVD watching,his hearing impared by surround sound overload, the figure glances at the lap top screen, relays click over in his mind, minute eddy current begin to flick through long dormant neural pathways, chemical messengers pounce betwixt synaptic gaps, Mr ORAC reaches for his keyboard. ;)

Gainesy
26th Oct 2002, 15:49
Drapes, I seem to remember that the good folk of Cyprus shook for yes and nodded for a no. Dunno about anybody else doing it.

tony draper
26th Oct 2002, 16:19
You may well be right Mr G, I seem to recal it was a very small area,(just a matter of of few tens of square miles)in northern Italy? not sure now.
Anthopologists were baffled by this,it is difficult to explain this behaviour in such a isolated spot.

ORAC
26th Oct 2002, 17:07
Common throughout the Balkans, Mr Draper, (Albania, Northern Greece, Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Romania, and European Turkey) and other eastern countries (e.g. Russia). "Yes" is indicated by a shake of the head. "No" by either a nod or an uptilted chin, usually accompanied by either raised eyebrows or shut eyes.

Also common is the is the tongue-click negator, found generally, but most often encountered in Turkey. It is a very simple way of saying "no, don't bother me with stupid questions." The tongue click is often accompanied by the upward eyebrow roll - yet another simple way of saying "no." The eyebrow roll is liked primarily due to the splendid lack of effort projected by the respondent. Not only does the upward eyebrow roll say "no", but it also conveys the thought, "no, and stop boring me, I'm not interested in talking to you." The common idea of both is laziness, that the respondent cannot be bothered to even formulate a reply to whatever question was asked.

Makes you wonder if nodding for yes is hard-wired at all.

brockenspectre
26th Oct 2002, 17:20
might this be a "christian world" "non-christian world" thing? With the advent of christianity and the sign of the cross, the first "up/down" strokes of that sign signify positive/yes and the across strokes signify "no"??

just ponderin at the end of a busy Sat on such a conundrum!!

:)

Groundgripper
26th Oct 2002, 19:26
Indians also nod for no and shake for yes, I understand. One of my colleagues at an exhibition in Bangalore was explaining something to a local and was getting very upset as said local was apparently disagreeing with everything he said!

lanciaspezzata
26th Oct 2002, 19:52
4 hours and 14 mins.

Is he losing his grip Mr Drapes?

Was that a nod or a shake and, if so............?


:rolleyes:

tony draper
26th Oct 2002, 20:38
Dammit Drapes was given to understand this strange behaviour was rare outside the Indian Sub Continent.
Draper will have scrap the learned paper wot he has rit for new scientist.
Drapes int gonna argue with Mr ORAC.

Blacksheep
27th Oct 2002, 02:20
I spent several months working in the sub-continent, where people also have a habit of rolling the head from side to side while speaking. This habit is infectious and one picks it up unconsciously. Upon returning to home base the habit takes several weeks to shake off, resulting in much hilarity among ones family, friends and colleagues. I mention this simply because it emphasises the nod/shake differences. Despite picking up the head rolling habit, I never could come to terms with nodding for no and shaking for yes - it just seems so damned unnatural.

**************************
Through difficulties to the cinema

reynoldsno1
28th Oct 2002, 18:43
Also common is the is the tongue-click negator, found generally, but most often encountered in Turkey. It is a very simple way of saying "no, don't bother me with stupid questions." The tongue click is often accompanied by the upward eyebrow roll - yet another simple way of saying "no." The eyebrow roll is liked primarily due to the splendid lack of effort projected by the respondent. Not only does the upward eyebrow roll say "no", but it also conveys the thought, "no, and stop boring me, I'm not interested in talking to you." The common idea of both is laziness, that the respondent cannot be bothered to even formulate a reply to whatever question was asked.

This behaviour is also demonstrated by Mrs Reynolds and Reynolds jr, usually in response to innocent questions from myself regarding the appropriateness of various financial transactions. Mrs Reynolds told me she came from Thailand... have I been deceived all these years...?

tony draper
28th Oct 2002, 18:56
We do have a head nodding way of ending conversations widely practiced on Tyneside.
The head is drawn back then moved forward very fast in a nodding motion terminating on the nose of the person one wishes to stop speaking.
Generaly known here as the Byker loaf, or nutting. ;)
This also appears to be a inherited behaviour. :rolleyes:

BlueEagle
28th Oct 2002, 22:05
Said with a strong Glaswegian accent:

"If at fust ye dont succeed, two wi' yer feet an' one wi' yer heed!".

So the Scots had this head nodding thing first.:)

Blacksheep
30th Oct 2002, 06:22
BlueEagle, draper is right - it is an inherited trait. The Northumbrians inherited the habit from their ancestors who fell over the wall and got too drunk to climb back.

**************************
Through difficulties to the cinema

Grainger
30th Oct 2002, 08:09
... apparently 180 degree shift in comunication behaviour ...

Nice one Drapes: no-one spotted your deliberate mistake....

180 degrees turns a nod back into a nod and a shake back into a shake :rolleyes:

Onan the Clumsy
30th Oct 2002, 19:21
Well in America...

...they CALL the nod a shake.

So they'll say "He shook his head in agreement", but it still goes up and down.

:confused: